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Graphic Classics, Volume 1: Edgar Allan Poe

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Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe is completely revised, with over forty pages of new material. New to this edition are comics adaptations of "King Pest", "The Imp of the Perverse", and "The Premature Burial". Plus a newly-illustrated version of "The Raven" by ten great artists. Returning from the previous edition are "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Fall of the House of Usher" Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe is completely revised, with over forty pages of new material. New to this edition are comics adaptations of "King Pest", "The Imp of the Perverse", and "The Premature Burial". Plus a newly-illustrated version of "The Raven" by ten great artists. Returning from the previous edition are "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Fall of the House of Usher" and six more thrilling stories.


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Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe is completely revised, with over forty pages of new material. New to this edition are comics adaptations of "King Pest", "The Imp of the Perverse", and "The Premature Burial". Plus a newly-illustrated version of "The Raven" by ten great artists. Returning from the previous edition are "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Fall of the House of Usher" Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe is completely revised, with over forty pages of new material. New to this edition are comics adaptations of "King Pest", "The Imp of the Perverse", and "The Premature Burial". Plus a newly-illustrated version of "The Raven" by ten great artists. Returning from the previous edition are "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Fall of the House of Usher" and six more thrilling stories.

30 review for Graphic Classics, Volume 1: Edgar Allan Poe

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    I wasn't paying attention at the library the other day, go figure, and grabbed two, which I thought were different copies of this book but with different covers. No biggie. Each had different art and were very enjoyable to read. I am a long time fan of Edgar Allan Poe since I had to read The Raven in middle school. These graphic classics by different artists were MOST EXCELLENT!! I secretly wanted to color them with colored pencils, but there library books. I must find these for my book collecti I wasn't paying attention at the library the other day, go figure, and grabbed two, which I thought were different copies of this book but with different covers. No biggie. Each had different art and were very enjoyable to read. I am a long time fan of Edgar Allan Poe since I had to read The Raven in middle school. These graphic classics by different artists were MOST EXCELLENT!! I secretly wanted to color them with colored pencils, but there library books. I must find these for my book collection.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This graphic novel takes a handful of classic tales and poems (and only the well-known ones, either) by Edgar Allan Poe and, using mostly his original words, illustrates each tale. This would certainly appeal to a reluctant reader who would otherwise be bogged down by the original story. Some of the art styles, to me, did not fit the tone of the original. "The Raven" I felt was the worst offender - the style was very stark to where the illustrations looked like abstractions, as well as being alm This graphic novel takes a handful of classic tales and poems (and only the well-known ones, either) by Edgar Allan Poe and, using mostly his original words, illustrates each tale. This would certainly appeal to a reluctant reader who would otherwise be bogged down by the original story. Some of the art styles, to me, did not fit the tone of the original. "The Raven" I felt was the worst offender - the style was very stark to where the illustrations looked like abstractions, as well as being almost cheerily cartoonish, which obviously does not fit with a man slowly going insane. The illustrations for "Annabel Lee" looked almost like a shojo manga, and there were a couple of others that just seemed wildly out of line with the original stories. However, most of the stories were illustrated in a realistic style that worked, and in most cases the paring down of Poe's words was well done. Some subtext was lost - I especially remember studying "The Fall of the House of Usher" and there being a huge underlying meaning, possibly incest, that I didn't get from the comic version. I also didn't remember "The Cask of Amontillado" ending like that, but it may just have been my memory. As said before, this would be great for a reluctant reader, especially since it uses Poe's original language.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miljana

    My personal favorite is the adaptation of The Tell-Tale Heart. I thought the drawing style was excellent and the story was fabulously adapted to the graphic novel format. Same goes for The Case of Amontillado and The Premature Burial. Other stories were nothing to brag about.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    This graphic novel was nothing like I expected. Some of the pieces had far to much text to actually enjoy the artwork put along side it. Obviously it was a collection of Poe's pieces, but some of the adaptations caused me to feel as though the author took too many liberties to place it in tune with modern language. Contrary to that statement, the pieces "The Tell-tale Heart" and "The Raven" held my attention to the novel. In "The Raven" the artwork is abstract like the text it is portraying. For This graphic novel was nothing like I expected. Some of the pieces had far to much text to actually enjoy the artwork put along side it. Obviously it was a collection of Poe's pieces, but some of the adaptations caused me to feel as though the author took too many liberties to place it in tune with modern language. Contrary to that statement, the pieces "The Tell-tale Heart" and "The Raven" held my attention to the novel. In "The Raven" the artwork is abstract like the text it is portraying. For example, page 23 is where the artist first exposes the raven to the reader and his form with almost devilish compared to the rest of the scene. Along with the abstract art, the pure language of "The Tell-Tale Heart" rings true to its original text almost perfectly. "I took up three planks of flooring and deposited them therein (Geary 83). The words flow just as they did in the original text with a simplistic picture to assist the reader in how the story teller believes that he is not at fault for insanity. I feel if you enjoy collections of classic tales this would be the for you. Finding yourself looking for another book such as this I would try the rest of the Graphic Classics series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Miss Kitty

    Normally abridged editions make me nauseous. But I picked this book up because I knew that it would be a good bus stop read (light enough to put in my bag and not make my shoulder hurt AND short sections that help if you lose your place). This graphic novel has entire short stories and poems and abridged (blech) short stories and poems by Master of Horror and Father of the Crime Novel. Some of the illustrations are better than others. I didn't care for the version of The Raven but The Cask of Am Normally abridged editions make me nauseous. But I picked this book up because I knew that it would be a good bus stop read (light enough to put in my bag and not make my shoulder hurt AND short sections that help if you lose your place). This graphic novel has entire short stories and poems and abridged (blech) short stories and poems by Master of Horror and Father of the Crime Novel. Some of the illustrations are better than others. I didn't care for the version of The Raven but The Cask of Amontillado was pretty nifty. And when you get down to it I really had to make peace with my aversion to abridged readings. Am I really ever going to read The Fall of the House of Usher? Probably not. It's like Wikipedia, but the print version and there's illustrations.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily Scott

    I didn't like the art.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marzia_Nicole

    I only liked the illustrated versions of: The Tell-Tale Heart The Premature Burial The Cask of Amontillado The Fall of the House of the Usher

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tripp

    BOOK REVIEW By: Tripp Bailey Is it possible to make a boring story interesting? Ask Rick Geary. In the book, "Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe" the story “The Tell-Tale Heart’ is revised as a graphic novel and is illustrated by Rick Geary. The actual story of "The Tell-Tale Heart" was written by Edgar Allan Poe. The story starts off with a man asking the reader if we think him to be mad. Then he proceeds to tell the reader a story, but a story of what? He said he had a thought that haunted him ev BOOK REVIEW By: Tripp Bailey Is it possible to make a boring story interesting? Ask Rick Geary. In the book, "Graphic Classics: Edgar Allan Poe" the story “The Tell-Tale Heart’ is revised as a graphic novel and is illustrated by Rick Geary. The actual story of "The Tell-Tale Heart" was written by Edgar Allan Poe. The story starts off with a man asking the reader if we think him to be mad. Then he proceeds to tell the reader a story, but a story of what? He said he had a thought that haunted him every day and night. The idea was to take the life of an old man he was living with. He explained that he did not hate the old man, but he despised his glass eye. In his mind, the only way to get rid of it was to kill him. The man then went through the steps and precautions he took to be rid of the old man. Once he finally did the deed, he was even more careful in the steps of hiding the murder. A short while after, the police knocked on the door and said the neighbors had heard a cry from the house. He assured them it was his own from a dream and the old man was out of town. Suddenly, the man heard a noise getting louder and louder. The sound drove him crazy and made him paranoid about what he had done and whether or not the police would find out. This story was very interesting, and I genuinely thought it was great. I believe the author and illustrator gave a great deal of effort into the story and making it suspenseful. The language also provided a lot of detail. The man says “For many minutes the heart beat on with a muffled sound. At last it stopped. The old man was dead.” This one quote from the story provides much detail about the death of the old man. The word muffled means a sound that is quiet because it is being obstructed in some way. This shows how faint the beat of the old man’s heart was and how long it took the old man to finally pass away. I found the part where he kills the old man to be very important to the tone of the passage. The tone was soft and gentle, which is not an expected tone when reading or writing about murder. The reason for the tone, is to try and mask the bad deed the man has done behind calm words. Another thing I found effective about this tale is how the author covers up the real reason the man killed the old man. The whole story the author leads us to believe that the man killed the old man because of his eye, but the reader comes to find out it was a different reason all along. The illustrations also provided a lot of emotion into the story. The looks on the man’s face as he prepares to kill the old man shows how deeply he thought about this. The emotion on the old man’s face was showing how he never suspected a thing about the murder. Overall, I really enjoyed the story. It had a great amount of detail and description throughout the pages that it made me want to continue reading it. I definitely recommend this. It has the ability to capture your imagination and keep you intrigued. I think many types of people would enjoy this story. For anyone who likes graphic novels, this is a must. Teens and adults who are in to the mystery genre I would recommend this to them as well. From the writing to the illustrations, I would one-hundred percent recommend this story and I might even read it again

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elian Gonzalez

    Graphics Classics by Edgar Allan Poe contains fourteen stories, each story is based on a different matter. The setting of the stories are based on the 14th-19th century, but some stories are based on the 20th century. One of the stories that I enjoyed the most, was the "Tell-Tale Heart". The story begins with an unnamed man telling the story from his point of view, in the picture he is nervous and he seems that he is an unstable person. Throughout the story, the man provides weak reasons of why Graphics Classics by Edgar Allan Poe contains fourteen stories, each story is based on a different matter. The setting of the stories are based on the 14th-19th century, but some stories are based on the 20th century. One of the stories that I enjoyed the most, was the "Tell-Tale Heart". The story begins with an unnamed man telling the story from his point of view, in the picture he is nervous and he seems that he is an unstable person. Throughout the story, the man provides weak reasons of why he wants to get rid of an old man and his "vulture" eye. For me, this story was funny, mysterious, and unstable and as soon as I opened this book I read it during the weekend. I personally thought this book was going to be boring and I almost turn it into the media center, but after reading the first 10 pages, it changed my mind. Edgar Allan Poe knows how to write entertaining stories for his readers. If the author wrote the second part, I would read it in a heartbeat, when I was on the last page of the book, I wished that the book did not have an end because it is entertaining.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This was a fun way to revisit some old favorite Poe tales and get acquainted with some others I hadn't read. I love the idea of transforming classic lit into a new format, and these artists did a nice job of bringing to life the dark, eerie, and sometimes downright horrific elements of Poe's stories and poems. Each piece was adapted by a different set of artists, and I certainly cared for some styles more than others (e.g., The Tell Tale Heart is a pretty sporadic one to lead off with), but over This was a fun way to revisit some old favorite Poe tales and get acquainted with some others I hadn't read. I love the idea of transforming classic lit into a new format, and these artists did a nice job of bringing to life the dark, eerie, and sometimes downright horrific elements of Poe's stories and poems. Each piece was adapted by a different set of artists, and I certainly cared for some styles more than others (e.g., The Tell Tale Heart is a pretty sporadic one to lead off with), but overall I'd recommend this as a fun creepy read for Poe fans and newcomers alike.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amcam

    This is a collection of 12 of Edgar Allan Poe's works - short stories and poems. They're retold/illustrated by various artists, so each is different. I really liked that. i think this is a great way for students to be introduced to Edgar Allan Poe. They can get the gist of his stories without getting lost in all of his big wording. This was read with my reading group at my school. Recommended for middle school readers on up.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kailyn

    This graphic novel adaptation of a sampling of EAP's writings was alright. I read a similar graphic novel that I enjoyed more. I liked the variety of stories, poems, and illustration types. I was happy to be introduced to new Poe stories that I hadn't heard before.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    Sadly, I couldn’t enjoy this one. The plus side was the stories, (its Edgar Allan Poe, what’s not to love?!?), but the art just wasn’t for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edmond Williams

    Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    An anthology of graphic adaptations of some of Edgar Allan Poe's works, both short stories and poems. Each story is written/illustrated by different people such as Rick Geary, Carlo Vegara, Matt Howarth and others resulting in a wide variety of artist styles throughout the book. Most of Poe's works collected here are his most famous but there are a few lesser known ones as well. There are quite a lot of changes to this 4th edition with the removal of, mostly, the shorter lesser known works and th An anthology of graphic adaptations of some of Edgar Allan Poe's works, both short stories and poems. Each story is written/illustrated by different people such as Rick Geary, Carlo Vegara, Matt Howarth and others resulting in a wide variety of artist styles throughout the book. Most of Poe's works collected here are his most famous but there are a few lesser known ones as well. There are quite a lot of changes to this 4th edition with the removal of, mostly, the shorter lesser known works and the addition of a few poems but especially two major long works. First, but most importantly; all my favourites from the 3rd edition are still present. As I said in that review, "My favourites were Rick Geary's retelling of "The Tell-Tale Heart" as I am fond of his work. I also enjoyed "The Imp of the Perverse" by Tom Pomplum and Lance Tooks which I had never heard of before. I also enjoyed Pedro Lopez' rendition of "The Cask of Amontillado" as that is one of my favourite Poe stories and the adaptation was well done." What has been removed are: King Pest, Eldorado (a poem), Spirits of the Dead (a poem), The Masque of Red Death, and Hop-Frog. The only one of these I deeply regret the removal of is The Masque of Red Death and to a much lesser degree Hop-Frog. The additions are mostly very strong. The Black Cat returns after its removal from the 3rd edition. The two new long pieces are The Pit and the Pendulum and William Wilson. The Pit and the Pendulum is worth the price of admission. It has been incredibly rendered in all its eerie glory by David Hontiveros and Carlo Vergara. Another of my favourite stories that has been presented in a terrifyingly creepy and atmospheric manner. This one joins my favourites in the entire book. William Wilson is a strange story to begin with but the artwork is gorgeously detailed and atmospheric; I love the portrait of Poe on the wall in the last frame. Not one of my favourite stories but adapted to graphic form very well and certainly worth the removal of Hop-Frog. Also new to this addition are the poems In a Sequestered Churchyard Where Once Poe Walk'd by H.P. Lovecraft, and Annabel Lee. The Raven is not new but the illustrations have been redone by J.B. Bonivert and I have to say I am not pleased with them at all. I don't know what you call this type of art but it is plain weird (almost farcical to me) and totally distracts from the somber, eerie tone of the poem. On the other hand, Bonivert illustrates the new Annabel Lee and is much more successful using a fairy tale theme to the art that grows darker frame by frame. If you already have a previous volume I think this one is well worth adding to your collection just for the addition of "The Pit and the Pendulum" alone. If you don't have this volume, what are you waiting for? This series is a great way to sample the author's work if you are unfamiliar with it and if you are a fan of Poe's it brings his work to another level by reading it in the graphic format.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I think the book is overall enjoyable but certainly not without it's flaws. I'd like to keep things short and sweet here since I honestly don't have too much to say about this book, but I did think it deserved a review. First off the positives! The poems and short stories featured in the book are as delightfully dark and twisted as ever. Just as we've come to expect from Edgar Allan Poe. And the illustrations do look very nice, each segment having a different art style then the last. They can va I think the book is overall enjoyable but certainly not without it's flaws. I'd like to keep things short and sweet here since I honestly don't have too much to say about this book, but I did think it deserved a review. First off the positives! The poems and short stories featured in the book are as delightfully dark and twisted as ever. Just as we've come to expect from Edgar Allan Poe. And the illustrations do look very nice, each segment having a different art style then the last. They can vary from the energetic and silly art style of a 40s cartoon to darker styles that feel more at home in an Edgar Allan Poe work. Which brings me to the one major negative I have with this book. The art style dissonance. Unfortunately since I checked this book out from a library and have already returned it, I can't allude to any specific examples, but if you've read it, I'm sure you'll know what I mean. Often times the book's illustrations will overshadow the original narrative rather then enhance the experience like it should. As a result, it's easy to be taken out of the moment by an art style that doesn't fit the tone of the story or illustrations that overshadow the story. Overall I do think the book is worth checking out if you're new to Edgar Allan Poe as the illustrations can help convey the messages a bit clearer to newcomers. Or if you're looking for something disturbing but not too frightening to read this Halloween ; ). As for anyone else (especially the purists) I think it might just be best to stick with the original poems and stories.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo

    A must-have for fans of the work of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as an excellent introduction to his work for those who don't have the time to actually read the original texts... it will surely tempt them to get hold of a Poe anthology, at the very least. While the selection may be seem tame or predictable (short stories adapted include "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Cask of Amontillado", "The Fall of the House of Usher", "The Masque of the Red Death"), some choices are a most welcome surprise ("The Im A must-have for fans of the work of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as an excellent introduction to his work for those who don't have the time to actually read the original texts... it will surely tempt them to get hold of a Poe anthology, at the very least. While the selection may be seem tame or predictable (short stories adapted include "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Cask of Amontillado", "The Fall of the House of Usher", "The Masque of the Red Death"), some choices are a most welcome surprise ("The Imp of the Perverse", "Hop-Frog", "Never Bet the Devil Your Head", and the poems "El Dorado" and "Spirits of the Dead"). The adaptations themselves cover a wide range of styles, from traditional Classics Illustrated style, to those showing the clear influence of American underground Comix and European-style contributions. "The Raven" stands out: each illustrator was given two strophes each, which resulted in a wild variety of styles of hommage to Poe's poem. All and all, a remarkable collection, a great read, both textually and visually.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This compilation and adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's various works includes varying illustrations to portray each. There are seven different short stories with portrayals created by different authors with totally different styles. While a black and white pallet is used throughout, each of the illustrations are different: some are more cartoonish while others are somewhat vague and dark. The text includes Poe's original writing as well as some adaptations. Having read many of Poe's original works This compilation and adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's various works includes varying illustrations to portray each. There are seven different short stories with portrayals created by different authors with totally different styles. While a black and white pallet is used throughout, each of the illustrations are different: some are more cartoonish while others are somewhat vague and dark. The text includes Poe's original writing as well as some adaptations. Having read many of Poe's original works, I found myself disappointed by this graphic novel adaptation. I actually enjoy the usual creepiness and darkness of the original, but I felt that many of the illustrations were much too cartoonish and comic-like. However, I do just generally prefer leaving the portrayal of novels up to my imagination so I do have a bias in general against graphic novels. Nevertheless, I am glad that the author decided to use a black and white pallet throughout as this did a good job of reflecting the overall darkness of the subjects.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    This book is dark but it is supposed to be since it is all of Edgar Allan Poe’s work. It shows you his work visually so you can understand the meanings of several of his poems and short stories. I think because this is such a dark graphic novel it should be more for 6th grade and up. In comparison with other texts I think this book is much darker since most children’s books are not like that, this doesn’t mean it cannot be used for classrooms. Older children will love this book! I find myself re This book is dark but it is supposed to be since it is all of Edgar Allan Poe’s work. It shows you his work visually so you can understand the meanings of several of his poems and short stories. I think because this is such a dark graphic novel it should be more for 6th grade and up. In comparison with other texts I think this book is much darker since most children’s books are not like that, this doesn’t mean it cannot be used for classrooms. Older children will love this book! I find myself relating to this book because I have always struggled with the works of Edgar Allen Poe and this book really helped me through the illustrations. In relation to the world this book is very different in comparison to other books; this is what will make children want to read it! Kids like things that are different and dark or a little twisted! Great for act or sat studying of vocabulary terms as well!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dexter

    I was extremely excited to read this, but... it was a bit of a disappointment. A few of them weren't so bad, such as "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Fall of the House of Usher." But most of the stories just... didn't turn out so well in comic form. Either the art style seemed odd or the adaptation of the story itself just didn't work so well. With Poe, you have to be careful. He is very sensory in his stories, so it's not impossible to make it into a graphic novel, but the writing itself is a I was extremely excited to read this, but... it was a bit of a disappointment. A few of them weren't so bad, such as "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Fall of the House of Usher." But most of the stories just... didn't turn out so well in comic form. Either the art style seemed odd or the adaptation of the story itself just didn't work so well. With Poe, you have to be careful. He is very sensory in his stories, so it's not impossible to make it into a graphic novel, but the writing itself is also a huge part of every story. So you have to be very very careful. The poems were probably the biggest disappointment. The same dude did both "The Raven" and "Annabel Lee," and I didn't care for his art style at all. I wanted dark and mysterious and sad, but it was just... bizarre. All in all, I'll just be sticking to pure Poe.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    This is one time that the goodread 5 star rating is a problem, for this book is right down the middle, deserving of two and a half, or two in a four star rating system, so giving it three is generous. Part of the problem is the uneveness of the stories and the illustrations. The is strong and respectable work, such as the adaptations of "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "King Pest," which lead the volume, but stodgy work such as "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "Spirits of the Dead." Fans of Poe wil This is one time that the goodread 5 star rating is a problem, for this book is right down the middle, deserving of two and a half, or two in a four star rating system, so giving it three is generous. Part of the problem is the uneveness of the stories and the illustrations. The is strong and respectable work, such as the adaptations of "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "King Pest," which lead the volume, but stodgy work such as "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "Spirits of the Dead." Fans of Poe will dispute this, I imagine, but I found the dullest stories to be those who depended most heavily on Poe's stodgy prose rather than those making strong adaptive statements. This book is decidedly a mixed bag.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Malik Anderson

    This book was a group of graphic novels written by Edgar Alan Poe. My favorite section was the story black cat because it was kind of creepy when the cat would look at you with one eye and the other eye cut out. I learned that people are very violent from this book. If I could talk to the author I would ask why he decided to write these creepy novels. I would recommend this book to people who like mystery and suspenseful books. I would not recommend this book to people who are scared of a lot of This book was a group of graphic novels written by Edgar Alan Poe. My favorite section was the story black cat because it was kind of creepy when the cat would look at you with one eye and the other eye cut out. I learned that people are very violent from this book. If I could talk to the author I would ask why he decided to write these creepy novels. I would recommend this book to people who like mystery and suspenseful books. I would not recommend this book to people who are scared of a lot of thing and people who don't like mystery and suspense.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Nothing beats horror than the man who personified it; Edgar Allan Poe. This book of the Graphic Classic series has a couple of his famous books inside. I chose this for a horror comic mostly because I'm a big Edgar Allan Poe fan and I haven't read his stories in a couple years so I thought it was perfect. The artwork was very realistic and added the element of horror to it. Excellent horror comic.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    This collection of Poe's stories is pretty amazing. I used it with my students and got some good feedback from my ESL students as well as reluctant readers--they loved it. The other students who do not struggle with reading and writing hated it. Oh, well, I think that's because they like to believe they're literary elitists. Whatever.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Edgar Allen Poe is a genius, and his stories are classics. This anthology is chock full of graphic adaptions of his stories by several authors and artists, with a mix of sequential art and illustrated prose and poetry. Each style, shockingly different, brought out interesting aspects of the story. Worth reading, if you like comics, or if you like Poe's work.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This collection features too much of Poe's poetry, which (other than The Raven) just doesn't work for me. I've heard that Emerson derided Poe as "the jingle man" and his poems, especially "The Bells," do little to dispel that notion, at least to my ears. Some of Poe's classic stories are included here, but with few exceptions, the illustrations really don't add anything.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    The review is for the art not the stories. It was more a Poe story with a few illustrations then a full blown graphic novel (with some exceptions) Most disappointing was the photo manipulations from the film "Masque of the Red Death" with Vincent Price. It didn't feel like art, just thought I was looking at some movie stills with a Photoshop filter thrown over it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    I read the e-book version, which made some of the writing hard to read. The illustrations though came through beautifully. Some were interesting (The Raven & Annabel Lee in particular), some were more traditional. Highly enjoyed it! I read the e-book version, which made some of the writing hard to read. The illustrations though came through beautifully. Some were interesting (The Raven & Annabel Lee in particular), some were more traditional. Highly enjoyed it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cat Coffey

    This was awesome! I'm a huge Poe fan and seeing the original works with illustrations was really cool. The artist did a great and picked some really good stories to do. I think this is a good introduction for first time Poe-readers because it is a quick read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    Poe purists won't like the fact that several of the stories were abridged, but it's still a fun read and an introduction to the author's work.

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