counter create hit The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker, Aged 45 3/4 - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker, Aged 45 3/4

Availability: Ready to download

Adrian Plass lovers got their initial baptism of laughter through his bestseller, The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (aged 37 3/4). The author's account of serious spiritual experiences naturally made him in demand as a public speaker so of course another diary was inevitable. The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker (aged 45 3/4) continues the misadventures of Ad Adrian Plass lovers got their initial baptism of laughter through his bestseller, The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (aged 37 3/4). The author's account of serious spiritual experiences naturally made him in demand as a public speaker so of course another diary was inevitable. The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker (aged 45 3/4) continues the misadventures of Adrian's fictional alter-ego. As Plass gathers regularly with his support group, we meet old friends, including his longsuffering wife, Anne; son Gerald, now grown but no less irrepressible; loony and loveable Leonard Thynn; Edwin, the wise church elder; and Richard and Doreen Cook, who are just as religious as ever. We also meet some new characters, such as Stephanie Widgeon, who only seems to have one thing to say, ever. . . and who knows, we might even find out why Leonard Thynn borrowed Adrian's cat all those years ago. And finally what is a banner ripping seminar?"


Compare
Ads Banner

Adrian Plass lovers got their initial baptism of laughter through his bestseller, The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (aged 37 3/4). The author's account of serious spiritual experiences naturally made him in demand as a public speaker so of course another diary was inevitable. The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker (aged 45 3/4) continues the misadventures of Ad Adrian Plass lovers got their initial baptism of laughter through his bestseller, The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (aged 37 3/4). The author's account of serious spiritual experiences naturally made him in demand as a public speaker so of course another diary was inevitable. The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker (aged 45 3/4) continues the misadventures of Adrian's fictional alter-ego. As Plass gathers regularly with his support group, we meet old friends, including his longsuffering wife, Anne; son Gerald, now grown but no less irrepressible; loony and loveable Leonard Thynn; Edwin, the wise church elder; and Richard and Doreen Cook, who are just as religious as ever. We also meet some new characters, such as Stephanie Widgeon, who only seems to have one thing to say, ever. . . and who knows, we might even find out why Leonard Thynn borrowed Adrian's cat all those years ago. And finally what is a banner ripping seminar?"

30 review for The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker, Aged 45 3/4

  1. 4 out of 5

    Janice Dick

    A delightful mix of off-the-wall British humour and sharp reality, interspersed with inspiration to touch the heart...and the funny bone. As one of the characters states, Adrian downplays his strengths and lays out his weaknesses to help others (my own wording). One of my favourite passages: When Adrian desires a support group for his speaking ministry, his wife says of him: "You get very cross, indeed, when anyone says anything remotely critical." When Adrian denies this, his son writes him a sh A delightful mix of off-the-wall British humour and sharp reality, interspersed with inspiration to touch the heart...and the funny bone. As one of the characters states, Adrian downplays his strengths and lays out his weaknesses to help others (my own wording). One of my favourite passages: When Adrian desires a support group for his speaking ministry, his wife says of him: "You get very cross, indeed, when anyone says anything remotely critical." When Adrian denies this, his son writes him a short bit of verse: "Freely I confess my sins, For God has poured His love in; But when another lists my faults, I want to smash his face in." The kind of humour and pick-me-up honesty that is refreshing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joakim Silverdal

    I can't remember how many times I've read these books, but Plass still makes me laugh just as hard as ever. And to have grown up in the church as a twentysomething I think I also need the books now MORE than ever. We meet the characters from the first book: sarcastic son Gerald, bewildred and wonderful wife Anne, unbelievably crazy friend Leonard, very religious Doreen Cook and (of course) the lost, bloited, egotistic, big-hearted, trying-to-do-right-but-failing-on-the-way Christian speaker that I can't remember how many times I've read these books, but Plass still makes me laugh just as hard as ever. And to have grown up in the church as a twentysomething I think I also need the books now MORE than ever. We meet the characters from the first book: sarcastic son Gerald, bewildred and wonderful wife Anne, unbelievably crazy friend Leonard, very religious Doreen Cook and (of course) the lost, bloited, egotistic, big-hearted, trying-to-do-right-but-failing-on-the-way Christian speaker that is: Adrian Plass. I could fill this review with a tremendous amount of spoilers of the funny, but I'm not. I'm gonna leave the reading (and laughing) to you my friend. However, I will tell you this: This is not just a laugh fest. This sequel contains a bit more long passages where depth in characters and life are explored in more profound ways than before. Also that a precursor of what's to come in the Plass world. The book is what I go to when I feel the church is not acting the way i think it should, or when people are stupid, or when I feel insecure about everything I believe in. This little book contains so much heart through humour, it's amazing. Don't believe me? Believe this: I have three copies of this book. One English, two Swedish. Why, you ask? I'll tell you why. I try to convince all my friends to read these books all the time. If someone is finally worn down by my nagging (and since too much nostalgia is connected to my original copy) I've simply bought two loaners, so as many people as possible get to read this book. If this makes me a part of the Adrian Plass canon, I don't mind. It's still not worse than Leonard Thynn borowing that cat. Why did he borrow that cat? I can't remember... Just kidding, i can SO remember. Read it, read it, read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristofer Strid

    The first book in a long time that made me sit in the sofa, next to my wife, giggling to myself! :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Marlow

    The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker, aged 45 3/4 – Adrian Plass. The original bestselling Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (Aged 37 ½) is a brilliant take on ordinary church members who wish their spiritual life was a little more evangelical-dramatic, and gently pokes humour at evangelical hang-ups whilst still very much loving the tribe he’s writing from. This volume continues the story – but now the fictionalised Adrian Plass is on a speaking tour. Whenever I’m feeling a little blue The Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, Christian Speaker, aged 45 3/4 – Adrian Plass. The original bestselling Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass (Aged 37 ½) is a brilliant take on ordinary church members who wish their spiritual life was a little more evangelical-dramatic, and gently pokes humour at evangelical hang-ups whilst still very much loving the tribe he’s writing from. This volume continues the story – but now the fictionalised Adrian Plass is on a speaking tour. Whenever I’m feeling a little blue or out of sorts, I reach for Adrian Plass. He should be given out by vicars on prescription. His humour is a little dated now (this book was written a while ago), but its heart is good and there’s much wisdom behind the humour. This time, I was struck by the temptation to fame and what a contradiction it is for Christians. If you’ve never read Plass before, start with the Sacred Diary, Aged 37.5 otherwise get this and enjoy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    This was a nice, light and funny read about Adrian as a public speaker. He fills us in with all the church characters, including his son, Gerald and wife, Ann, showing that the church is a group of people with all the usual faults and weaknesses but on the whole a loving and supportive bunch of people. Adrian and his family travel abroad to Australia in this book for him to do some speaking and we have a description of his time there. Recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    No one makes me laugh and cry and feel like everything will be ok like Adrian Plass. Highly recommend for anyone who struggles with faith, who sees the faults in the church, or who needs a good laugh and some solid encouragement. Was honestly afraid this book wouldn't hold up against the original but is at least as good as the first Diaries.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sofie Strömvall

    Despite making fun of Christianity's many flaws and traditions - it keeps the core: the love, care, mercy and beauty of our faith. Very sincere. (Maybe to much on a few occasions.) And hilarious. Which Adrian manages to combine in one excellent story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trish Boese

    4* Very funny. Adrian Plass exposes the inconsistencies that haunt even sincere Christians.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Ferguson

    More hilarious satire from Adrian Plass. While it didn't quite reach the dizzying heights of the first book, it was brilliant! Highly recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lizzi Lilley

    Entertainingly meaningful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    A little more thought-provoking than the earlier 'diary' by the same author, but there are still some very funny moments. The second time I read it, in 1999, was less than two years after the first time, so it wasn't quite so hilarious, but still well worth reading. It ties up a lot of loose ends from the earlier Plass books. Added after third reading in 2014: The first three books were - to coin an over-used cliché - a breath of fresh air when they first appeared, in the early 1990s. Plass spoke A little more thought-provoking than the earlier 'diary' by the same author, but there are still some very funny moments. The second time I read it, in 1999, was less than two years after the first time, so it wasn't quite so hilarious, but still well worth reading. It ties up a lot of loose ends from the earlier Plass books. Added after third reading in 2014: The first three books were - to coin an over-used cliché - a breath of fresh air when they first appeared, in the early 1990s. Plass spoke honestly into a generation of young people who had grown up in evangelical circles, but were starting to ask open and sometimes difficult questions which the leaders were reluctant to answer. Modernism was giving way to post-modernism in the West, but the church in general was failing to keep up. Plass encouraged us to laugh at ourselves, and to poke gentle fun at some of the foibles of the church from within, while - at the same time - focussing more closely on the God who loves us despite everything. I had been concerned that this sequel, published in 1997, would prove a disappointment, but was delighted to be proved wrong. I smiled in many places, and chuckled few times, and found myself thinking about the contents at odd times long after I had finished. Re-reading 15 years later, I enjoyed it afresh, and yes, despite knowing most of the punchlines and the general outcome of the stories, I still found myself laughing out loud more than once. Highly recommended, although it makes the most sense to read this after, at least, the first Sacred Diary book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    The fourth book in the Sacred Diaries series, which came out in 1994 (did you know there's one as recent as 2013?). I was a teenager when Plassmania swept the Christian world in the UK, Australia and New Zealand (and Germany apparently...). I even went to see him live at Greenlane Christian Centre alongside as many other people as could fit in that venue. His dry humour and the things he could apparently get away with saying about Christianity made him a bit of a hero to a thoroughly churchified The fourth book in the Sacred Diaries series, which came out in 1994 (did you know there's one as recent as 2013?). I was a teenager when Plassmania swept the Christian world in the UK, Australia and New Zealand (and Germany apparently...). I even went to see him live at Greenlane Christian Centre alongside as many other people as could fit in that venue. His dry humour and the things he could apparently get away with saying about Christianity made him a bit of a hero to a thoroughly churchified teenager. Anyway, I picked up this (hardcover) book at the Lions Club book fair recently for something like $2... and now I'm hooked again and hunting down his other books. The thing about it is that - yes - it's funny (sometimes very very funny) but what I hadn't appreciated previously was the incisive critique, and the serious bits that address real issues. Plass follows the old trick of laugh, laugh, laugh, truth bomb, laugh, laugh.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Clare Khan

    I decided that with or without rereading "The Horizontal Epistles of Andromeda Veal" and "The Theatrical Tapes of Leonard Thynn", I was going to finish rereading this Sacred Diary! Once opened, it just couldn't be put down! I laughed, I cried! Adrian Plass just has a unique way of showing how funny and wrong the Church and Christians can be, but how God loves us all anyway!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jordyn

    Adrian Plass has a way of making you laugh hysterically and think deeply at the same time. Feel I have learned more from this book about Christianity and a relationship with God than most of the other Christian books I have read, and it didn't throw it in my face and have me feeling depressed whilst doing it!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Didn't love it as much as the original Sacred Diary of Adrian Plass, but it was still good. He gently pokes fun at the state of the modern Christianity, which made me laugh out loud at times, but some of it made me sad as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alyona

    Brilliant! Had even more laughed-my-head-off and almost-made-me-cry moments than with the first Diary. Especially loved the Scripture rewrites thing: both hilarious and instructive at the same time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marije

    Ook fantastisch.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Love this book just as much as the first Diary. Makes me laugh out loud a lot!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

    Nicht ganz so lustig wie das erste Tagebuch, aber dennoch sehr gut.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    Just as great as the first with a great punch at the end.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Arne Teigland

    Gut-splitting laughs are impossible to avoid as Adrian exposes some of the foibles of evangelical Christians by poking fun at himself.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather Stanley

    I loved this book. Adrian has a gift to tell it how it is, and tell it how it should be.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Smith

    Simply brilliant! Had me laughing out loud on the bus as well as trying not to cry at times - so many true things still; well worth reading again after quite a number of years.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Joy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rob Collinson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rhett Konneman

  28. 5 out of 5

    Esther Hansen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daniella

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adriaan Van doorn

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.