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Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the fi Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for the massacres in Iraq in 1963; the extraordinary private backing of the US in its aggression against Vietnam; support for the rise of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin; the running of a covert 'dirty war' in Yemen in the 1960s; secret campaigns with the US to overthrow the governments of Indonesia and British Guiana; the welcoming of General Pinochet's brutal coup in Chile in 1973; and much more. This explosive new book, from the author of Web of Deceit, exposes the reality of the Blair government's foreign policies since the invasion of Iraq. It discloses government documents showing that Britain's military is poised for a new phase of global intervention with the US, and reveals the extraordinary propaganda campaigns being mounted to obscure the reality of policies from the public.


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Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the fi Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for the massacres in Iraq in 1963; the extraordinary private backing of the US in its aggression against Vietnam; support for the rise of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin; the running of a covert 'dirty war' in Yemen in the 1960s; secret campaigns with the US to overthrow the governments of Indonesia and British Guiana; the welcoming of General Pinochet's brutal coup in Chile in 1973; and much more. This explosive new book, from the author of Web of Deceit, exposes the reality of the Blair government's foreign policies since the invasion of Iraq. It discloses government documents showing that Britain's military is poised for a new phase of global intervention with the US, and reveals the extraordinary propaganda campaigns being mounted to obscure the reality of policies from the public.

30 review for Unpeople: Britain's Secret Human Rights Abuses

  1. 5 out of 5

    Col

    Synopsis/blurb...... Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for the massacres in Iraq in Synopsis/blurb...... Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people. These are Unpeople - those whose lives are seen as expendable in the pursuit of Britain's economic and political goals. In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for the massacres in Iraq in 1963; the extraordinary private backing of the US in its aggression against Vietnam; support for the rise of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin; the running of a covert 'dirty war' in Yemen in the 1960s; secret campaigns with the US to overthrow the governments of Indonesia and British Guiana; the welcoming of General Pinochet's brutal coup in Chile in 1973; and much more. This explosive new book, from the author of Web of Deceit, exposes the reality of the Blair government's foreign policies since the invasion of Iraq. It discloses government documents showing that Britain's military is poised for a new phase of global intervention with the US, and reveals the extraordinary propaganda campaigns being mounted to obscure the reality of policies from the public. Whilst my main reading interests lie firmly in crime fiction, I do like to read a bit of non-fiction now away, whether it’s memoirs, history, politics or social commentary. Last year I read about 13 non-fiction books, this year Unpeople was only the second after Dominic Streatfeild’s Cocaine back in January. Unpeople has been in the car for months and months now, and probably due to the subject matter didn’t really lend itself to dipping in and dipping out whenever I had those 10 spare minutes while waiting for my better half to finish work or during a waiting period on my Taxi-Dad duties. In the end irritated by the lack of progress with the book, I decided to just get stuck in and read it. I’m not too interested in spouting my political views or engaging in a debate over successive British government’s foreign policies, I‘d rather chat about whether or not I should read a few Golden Age Mysteries or stick to my current diet of crime. Unpeople was interesting enough. There were some examples of some British policies and interventions that occurred in the post-war years that I was unaware of. More recent examples, such as Iraq and Afghanistan; well you would probably have to be living in a cave in Pakistan to remain unaware of these. The author obviously has an agenda and whilst all his examples are supported by the evidence presented, after a while it just wearied me. Governments do awful things in the name of national interest and security and it would be difficult to consider some of the policies discussed objectively and condone the actions taken. Would the world be a different place if different decisions and policies had been made and followed? Would the death toll have been less in Iraq, in Chile, in Nigeria or in Uganda? Maybe. I suppose the saddest fact is that so much of what is decided goes unnoticed or unchallenged with little debate in parliament or by the press. Iraq probably being the exception. I’m probably a little bit more naive than I had previously reckoned, unaware of the regularity with which Prime Ministers lied to the House of Commons. When I was younger, I used to think that voting for one party or another made a difference; Unpeople confirms my latter-acquired cynicism that there is little to choose between the parties at least in respect of foreign policy. Government has decided that a life in Africa, or Asia or South America has less value than big business. and the balance of payments. Unpeople rated a 3 from 5. Acquired second hand from a local charity shop earlier in the year.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hebden

    My review of this may go off on a tangent at some stage given the important issues this book raises. Firstly it is a very well researched work detailing historic British abuses of power in the foreign policy arena to further our national interests abroad. Much of the information here is derived from official declassified papers and so cannot be termed as biased or misreported. It was a timely book when it was released in 2004 at the height of popular opposition to the invasion of Iraq. Though the My review of this may go off on a tangent at some stage given the important issues this book raises. Firstly it is a very well researched work detailing historic British abuses of power in the foreign policy arena to further our national interests abroad. Much of the information here is derived from official declassified papers and so cannot be termed as biased or misreported. It was a timely book when it was released in 2004 at the height of popular opposition to the invasion of Iraq. Though the first two chapters concern Iraq and the illegal invasion thereof, this book sets out to prove that, far from being a single aberration, the dark manoeuvrings that culminated in the 2003 invasion of a sovereign nation is in fact the continuation of an age old, very British style of foreign policy; that of military intervention and destabilisation of other states to further the economic and geopolitical goals of the UK Government. What stands out for me in all of this is the hypocrisy of some of the “anti-Iraq war” commentators, whose sense of that injustice is all too noticeable when analysed alongside their supportive intransigence on other, and in many cases worse atrocities committed in their names as citizens of this country. The list of interventions is seemingly endless, and these are only the ones we know about. Since 1945 our government is responsible, or in some way culpable for around 10,000,000 civilian deaths according to the research in this book. Clearly this is a “ball park” figure and the real number could be slightly lower or much, much higher. My money would be on an overall increase in that estimate when the amount of countries is taken in to account, whose regimes we supported generally didn’t make too good a job of keeping accurate data on civilian casualties; Malaya, Kenya, Iran, British Guiana, Oman, Indonesia twice, Vietnam, Yemen, Iraq numerous times, Afghanistan, Kurdistan, Columbia, Chagos Islands, Nigeria, Biafra, Uganda, Chile, Yugoslavia, Sierra Leone and Palestine. I may have missed some there but it’s already an extensive list. How can we go on thinking that we are one of the “good guys” of global politics when our history shows us to be anything but. And how can we continue to support our political parties, all of whom have blood on their hands, innocent blood. Every single one of the wars we have engaged in, or regimes we have propped up has been to aid the progression of British business, whether they were mining corporations, oil firms or an intervention to secure a generally ideological sheen that enabled the “free” market to reign in the third world. There are no selfless invasions or plainly humanitarian military actions, if there were we would long ago have invaded China, Israel, Russia, India and the United States, all of whom are past masters at oppression and human rights abuses. Many of the problems we face now in the middle east are as a result of our armies propping up the regimes of militant Islamist governments when Communism was the larger bogeyman on the horizon. For anyone who was against the war in Iraq, well done. Give yourself a little pat on the back and then open your eyes and look at British influence on the wider world. Everywhere you look, you will see chaos, death and destruction and all of it was carried out with your tacit support either overtly or because of your (and my) laziness in observing what the hell our Government does in the big bad world. We’re not the good guys I’m afraid.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Perfect book for people curious about British military jaunts around the world since WW2. It consolidated my opinions on Iraq (which is studied in detail), but also enlightened me about the specific British role in wars in Iran, British Guiana, Egypt, Indonesia, Yemen, Oman, Libya, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Chile, Nicaragua, Panama, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria and Uganda, among others. Spoiler alert: the intentions weren't all that altruistic. Uses an extensive Perfect book for people curious about British military jaunts around the world since WW2. It consolidated my opinions on Iraq (which is studied in detail), but also enlightened me about the specific British role in wars in Iran, British Guiana, Egypt, Indonesia, Yemen, Oman, Libya, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Chile, Nicaragua, Panama, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria and Uganda, among others. Spoiler alert: the intentions weren't all that altruistic. Uses an extensive range of sources, including many many national archive documents that have been released after 30 years of being kept secret, and for the most part presents the facts as they are. Having entered the genre myself through reading Chomsky, I found this take on British foreign affairs equally enjoyable to read, and actually much denser in factual content.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ollie

    Excellently researched book going back to original Foreign Office communications so you're getting information from the "horses mouth" so to speak. What this shows is a conniving British Government working not in the interests of the people but in the interests of businesses and maintaining geopolitical control, wreaking havoc across the world and causing misery for the "Unpeople". The innocent civilians that get caught up in our Governments aims. If you're interested in a sustainable, viable fu Excellently researched book going back to original Foreign Office communications so you're getting information from the "horses mouth" so to speak. What this shows is a conniving British Government working not in the interests of the people but in the interests of businesses and maintaining geopolitical control, wreaking havoc across the world and causing misery for the "Unpeople". The innocent civilians that get caught up in our Governments aims. If you're interested in a sustainable, viable future, free from war and oppression then I recommend you read this book and arm yourself with its knowledge.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kandachamy Vijayakumaran

    It is cruel world where trade interests of the US and UK and other developed nations have played havoc with the life of millions of people in the third world. Curtis has taken the pain to amass the information from sources others would not care to look at. Now we are convinced that there is no escape from the fate unless the whole world mobilize against and isolate these forces. But how many will care to read Curtis?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Pushon Bhattacharya

    An angry dissection of British foreign policy from after WWII that is as well-written as it is well-sourced. The most important finding conveyed in this book is that however dishonest our politicians and military officers are in public, they are remarkably candid about their intentions in private.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gilles Achache

    So far very greatly enjoying this.....one of my friends from high school days knew stuff about the American CIA, she passed sensitive stuff on to me, so we're both people who read this type of book from time to time.....people (& unpeople like me, hence no pic for goodreads) who feel they know a thing or two.....it's a perverse enjoyment, we shouldn't like it, but......we do......aaaannnd.....have finished it! Very good, must pass it on to that old High School friend. So far very greatly enjoying this.....one of my friends from high school days knew stuff about the American CIA, she passed sensitive stuff on to me, so we're both people who read this type of book from time to time.....people (& unpeople like me, hence no pic for goodreads) who feel they know a thing or two.....it's a perverse enjoyment, we shouldn't like it, but......we do......aaaannnd.....have finished it! Very good, must pass it on to that old High School friend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    This book was a really interesting look into the real motives behind UK foreign policy. Disturbing how much economics, trade, arms deal help decide the UK government's actions and how little the people who may be affected by those policies. I was also disturbed by the lack of investigative journalism in the UK and how much the mainstream media seem to follow the government line. Highly recommended reading for the political skeptic! This book was a really interesting look into the real motives behind UK foreign policy. Disturbing how much economics, trade, arms deal help decide the UK government's actions and how little the people who may be affected by those policies. I was also disturbed by the lack of investigative journalism in the UK and how much the mainstream media seem to follow the government line. Highly recommended reading for the political skeptic!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Del

    Blows the lid clear off our less than glorious history and shows clearly the causes of political instability across the Middle East and beyond.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Steele

    Only depressing if you think we can't do anything about it. We can! Real Democracy Now! Only depressing if you think we can't do anything about it. We can! Real Democracy Now!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sam Hunt

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Frimley

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon Wyatt

  15. 5 out of 5

    Francis Fielding

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tom Blackburn

  17. 5 out of 5

    calum steele

  18. 4 out of 5

    Iain Anderson

  19. 5 out of 5

    دار الأكاديمية

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert Curtis

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  24. 5 out of 5

    Layla Greening

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  26. 5 out of 5

    Danfis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Goya Champuru

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sean Scully

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kieran

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