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How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (And the World): And What You Can Do about It

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After carving up the once lovingly cared-for downtowns of Small Town America, Wal-Mart launched a frontal assault on mom-and-pop businesses all over the globe. With 1.5 million employees operating more than 3, 500 stores, Wal-Mart is now the world'¬?s largest private employer. In this third edition of How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (and the World), intrepid Texas newsp After carving up the once lovingly cared-for downtowns of Small Town America, Wal-Mart launched a frontal assault on mom-and-pop businesses all over the globe. With 1.5 million employees operating more than 3, 500 stores, Wal-Mart is now the world'¬?s largest private employer. In this third edition of How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (and the World), intrepid Texas newspaperman Bill Quinn continues the fight. Featuring detailed accounts of Wal-Mart'¬?s questionable business practices and the latest information on Wal-Mart lawsuits, vendor issues, and efforts to stop expansion, Quinn shows why Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., is arguably the most feared and despised corporation in the world. Whether you'¬?re a customer fed up with Wal-Mart'¬?s false claims, a vendor squeezed by strong-arm tactics, a worker pushed to increase the Waltons'¬? bottom line, or a concerned citizen trying to save your hometown, this book will show you how to get Wal-Mart off your back and out of your backyard.BILL QUINN is a World War II veteran, retired newspaperman, and certified anti-Wal-Mart crusader. He lives with his wife, Lennie, in Grand Saline,Texas.


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After carving up the once lovingly cared-for downtowns of Small Town America, Wal-Mart launched a frontal assault on mom-and-pop businesses all over the globe. With 1.5 million employees operating more than 3, 500 stores, Wal-Mart is now the world'¬?s largest private employer. In this third edition of How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (and the World), intrepid Texas newsp After carving up the once lovingly cared-for downtowns of Small Town America, Wal-Mart launched a frontal assault on mom-and-pop businesses all over the globe. With 1.5 million employees operating more than 3, 500 stores, Wal-Mart is now the world'¬?s largest private employer. In this third edition of How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (and the World), intrepid Texas newspaperman Bill Quinn continues the fight. Featuring detailed accounts of Wal-Mart'¬?s questionable business practices and the latest information on Wal-Mart lawsuits, vendor issues, and efforts to stop expansion, Quinn shows why Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., is arguably the most feared and despised corporation in the world. Whether you'¬?re a customer fed up with Wal-Mart'¬?s false claims, a vendor squeezed by strong-arm tactics, a worker pushed to increase the Waltons'¬? bottom line, or a concerned citizen trying to save your hometown, this book will show you how to get Wal-Mart off your back and out of your backyard.BILL QUINN is a World War II veteran, retired newspaperman, and certified anti-Wal-Mart crusader. He lives with his wife, Lennie, in Grand Saline,Texas.

30 review for How Wal-Mart Is Destroying America (And the World): And What You Can Do about It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Werner

    It would be hard to improve on the above description. Salty octogenarian Texas journalist Quinn is one of the retailing Goliath's severest critics, and his newspaper background stands him in good stead in digging out the solid facts of his story and presenting them in a clear, cogent fashion. He stops short of calling for a complete boycott of Wal-mart, recognizing the difficulties that might pose for many readers (I personally boycott this scourge of our country and its economy, but the rest of It would be hard to improve on the above description. Salty octogenarian Texas journalist Quinn is one of the retailing Goliath's severest critics, and his newspaper background stands him in good stead in digging out the solid facts of his story and presenting them in a clear, cogent fashion. He stops short of calling for a complete boycott of Wal-mart, recognizing the difficulties that might pose for many readers (I personally boycott this scourge of our country and its economy, but the rest of my family doesn't); but he certainly exposes the insidious nature of its business practices, and suggests basic steps consumers can take to fight back against it. Neither genuine democracy, economic justice, or the opportunity for ordinary people to live a life of reasonable prosperity can survive in the kind of economy Wal-mart is well on its way to creating: one in which virtually the entire populace is forced into economic serfdom for the enrichment of one corporation, no small business can exist, and the terms of economic life for everybody are dictated at will by a handful of corporate executives. (And to glorify that state of affairs as "free enterprise" is an abuse of language of Orwellian proportions.) This is why monopoly practices were supposedly outlawed in the U.S. in 1890; and Wal-mart's ability to flout that law with impunity, with the economic and bipartisan political power it already has (Hilary Clinton, for instance, is a major stockholder), is just a foretaste of what it could do as its power grows along with its "market share." In my opinion, this book is a wakeup call for every person who cares about whether or not our kids will still be able to live in the kind of America for whose survival our parents generation fought for in WWII. It ought to be in every library in the U.S!

  2. 4 out of 5

    SC

    It's a tad bit sensationalist, but very informative. Entertaining, yet scary. Don't try giving it to your Republican friends, though. Could spark some nasty arguments involving your allegiance to capitalism, and therefore America. Sigh.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Diminutive in size, this book houses acres upon acres of all the crap the Wal-Mart phenomena has spread throughout the country. Having grown up in Texas when the invasion began (originally they purposely stayed away from the larger cities in order to drain the smaller towns of their extant retail – all under the banner of being a small town community friend) and later living dangerously close to their crummy empire – all in addition to having a spouse briefly employed by these grease balls – I t Diminutive in size, this book houses acres upon acres of all the crap the Wal-Mart phenomena has spread throughout the country. Having grown up in Texas when the invasion began (originally they purposely stayed away from the larger cities in order to drain the smaller towns of their extant retail – all under the banner of being a small town community friend) and later living dangerously close to their crummy empire – all in addition to having a spouse briefly employed by these grease balls – I thought I knew everything about their nefarious tactics. But I was wrong. Quinn outlines the multitude of damage and attendant never-to-be-settled lawsuits that accompany the cancerous creep that is Sam Walton’s beast (and don’t forget former CEO David Glass. I’m chilled just remembering that A-hole). Quinn, also from Texas, offers so much stuff – even in the earlier edition I read – that my first reaction was occasional disbelief. However my wife – having once been forced to do that damn cheer - vouched for some of these amazing factoids. Incredible! Well, I need some new plastic cutlery – off to the local Wal-Mart… (spelled “Wall-mart” in one of the greatest South Park episodes ever).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I wrote my senior thesis on how Wal-Mart wreaks havoc on small-town America. This book gives regular people insight into the workings of the most powerful company in the world, and the questionable business practices it has used to get and stay there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kati Giblin

    Very, very poorly written. But I enjoyed the facts, the anecdotes, and the message, so I enjoyed the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    This book was written in 2000, so very dated, not to mention the author has since died. A lot has changed in the 12 years since he wrote this book. I can't help but think, what would he write about Walmart today, especially when so many other stores have gone the same route? Every large store today has a pharmacy, restaurant(s), photo lab, eye wear, gosh, even Costco has their own gas station for crying out loud. Target and Costco are two stores off the top of my head that are also huge box stor This book was written in 2000, so very dated, not to mention the author has since died. A lot has changed in the 12 years since he wrote this book. I can't help but think, what would he write about Walmart today, especially when so many other stores have gone the same route? Every large store today has a pharmacy, restaurant(s), photo lab, eye wear, gosh, even Costco has their own gas station for crying out loud. Target and Costco are two stores off the top of my head that are also huge box stores of today. Both stores carry everything as well. I am a Walmart shopper, have been since 2000 when we moved to the US. I've also been to Walmarts in Ontario (I'm from there), and in the UK. Though I remember the UK one being nice, the Ontario Walmarts are shameful and I never shop(ped) there. The one in my current city is awful. Actually no one admits to shopping at Walmart here, it's for the lower class. You walk in and you see it. In the last town I lived I drove 20 minutes to the closest Walmart, then Walmart came to our town and like Bill Quinn claimed they built on the outskirts and they did pay their employees less than the one I would go too. I shopped at the new Walmart a few times and like he said their merchandise was more expensive than the one that is smack in the middle of everything. There were so many town people that were very unhappy with our Walmart and guess what? I returned to my original one and so did so many of my friends. I know our town's Walmart was empty all the time, but it didn't take out any of our businesses and the people who loved Winn Dixie (I was one of them) returned to Winn Dixie as well. Of all the Walmart stores I've been in, I don't ever remember seeing boxes stacked up so high that it would be dangerous for their customers. Maybe Walmart did this back then, not today. I have a couple of friends in Ontario who work for Walmart. Walmart couldn't get away with paying below minimum wage there. Ontario have stricter rules than the US. I wish I had friends who worked for them in the states that I could ask if they make below minimum wage. I'm sure Walmart is really dirty and does get away with "murder" with all the stories Bill Quinn told in the book, but I can guarantee you that Walmart isn't the only other huge corporation that does this. I remember the Kathy Lee Gifford scandal and when she found out that her line of clothes that she sold in Walmart was made by children in sweat shops in third world countries. Well, if you believe that her company was and is the only one that is made by children that make only pennnies per hours, you are in denial. Many of your designer clothes you are wearing today are made by children in sweat shops. It's very sad and maddening, but that is the reality of big corporations making more money for themselves. This book has opened my eyes and when I did my grocery shopping yesterday, I didn't do it at Walmart and I will definately think twice if I want to do my shopping at Walmart again, but has anyone ever tried shopping at any of the mom and pop stores? They are hugely overpriced and I'm sorry, but this family of 5 (with 2 in university and my third in another 4 years) cannot afford to spend $50 on a pillow when I need to buy 5 others for my couch. Of course there are certain stuff in Walmart I would never fantom to buy such as clothes or shoes etc. I would love to support most of the small shops, but honestly when I walked into the furniture shop last week and saw one lamp for $250, I'm going to have to return to the large corporations to buy it. Another issue that I'm sure is quite outdated from the time Bill Quinn wrote this book is that Walmart is still going in to small towns today and taking out the mom & pop small businesses, I think those days are long gone. He's done his damage. I couldn't help but think it was really the people's fault. They were the ones that deserted their mom and pop stores, no one held a gun to their heads and told them they had to do all their shopping at Walmart. I am certainly not defending Walmart, I'm just saying this company is not alone and I can beat everything I own that there are so many other huge corporations that are just as ugly and get away with murder as well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Megalion

    Author does a good job of laying out Walmart's predatory practices. However, I gave it 4 stars over 5 because I think it could have been better and more detailed. I'd like to have seen more about what other harmful things they do besides destroy local economies and abuse their workforces. For example, I recently read a book about the guy who walked the full length of the Amazon. He mentions that some of the areas being deforested was for cattle... and Walmart was one of the three big corporations Author does a good job of laying out Walmart's predatory practices. However, I gave it 4 stars over 5 because I think it could have been better and more detailed. I'd like to have seen more about what other harmful things they do besides destroy local economies and abuse their workforces. For example, I recently read a book about the guy who walked the full length of the Amazon. He mentions that some of the areas being deforested was for cattle... and Walmart was one of the three big corporations involved in that. There's also the incident of the fire last November (2012) that claimed the lives of many factory workers in Bangladesh. Which probably is after the latest edition of this book but surely it wasn't the only incident. Author makes a very brief reference to the type of overseas factory oversight that Walmart performs (complains about overtime, says nothing about safety). I would have liked more there. I recommend this to anyone who doesn't know or understand why Walmart is a bad thing and is willing to hear why. Also to anyone who knows that it is but is vague about the specifics. I myself read it because I wanted to be able to articulate why I went back to boycotting Walmart. I was not proud of the fact that I forsook my original intention to not shop there. Needed a boot to get my resolve back.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    As much as I enjoyed this book, my husband hated it. He didn't read it, but since he is a Walmart kind of guy and I'm a Target kind of gal I felt compelled to share a lot of the book with him. I noticed by half way thru he either left the room when I picked it up or turned up the tv so he could ignore my rantings! I have to admit that I do lot of my shopping there, but my excuse is that it is right down the street from work and less than 5 miles from my home. Target is 45 miles away so with the As much as I enjoyed this book, my husband hated it. He didn't read it, but since he is a Walmart kind of guy and I'm a Target kind of gal I felt compelled to share a lot of the book with him. I noticed by half way thru he either left the room when I picked it up or turned up the tv so he could ignore my rantings! I have to admit that I do lot of my shopping there, but my excuse is that it is right down the street from work and less than 5 miles from my home. Target is 45 miles away so with the price of gas [from Walmart's co heart Murphy] I can't afford to drive there often! I never liked Walmart, but what am I to do?? I did boycott them in December for several years in a row since they refused to say Merry Christmas, but last year they gave in and so did I! By the way, I live in Walmart country.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Wanamaker

    This book contains interesting information about Wal-Mart's tactics to eliminate competing small town retailers and many other outcomes that impact a town with a Wal-Mart. It includes information from former employees, competing retailers, newspapers, and television. Much of this information in important to know, especially if a community is interested in allowing a Wal-Mart into their town. However, this book has its problems. It appeared to me that many of these arguments came to the conclusio This book contains interesting information about Wal-Mart's tactics to eliminate competing small town retailers and many other outcomes that impact a town with a Wal-Mart. It includes information from former employees, competing retailers, newspapers, and television. Much of this information in important to know, especially if a community is interested in allowing a Wal-Mart into their town. However, this book has its problems. It appeared to me that many of these arguments came to the conclusion that Wal-Mart is bad for small towns and we need small towns for the sake of small towns. This argument needed to be developed more to show the benefits of having small town retailers. This book is also written very colloqually and takes many cheap shots at Wal-Mart. Overall, the information in this book is important to know, it just could have been presented better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

    This book accomplishes its goal very well, giving people a bushel full of reasons on why to avoid buying (or selling) to Wal-Mart; everything from ethical to practical. However, as its only targeting Wal-Mart, it fails to adequately place Wal-Mart in the context of American capitalist-imperialism. But, as I said earlier, that's not the goal of this book. If you're organizing a campaign to either shut down a Wal-Mart, or to keep one out of your town, buy this book and give it to as many people as This book accomplishes its goal very well, giving people a bushel full of reasons on why to avoid buying (or selling) to Wal-Mart; everything from ethical to practical. However, as its only targeting Wal-Mart, it fails to adequately place Wal-Mart in the context of American capitalist-imperialism. But, as I said earlier, that's not the goal of this book. If you're organizing a campaign to either shut down a Wal-Mart, or to keep one out of your town, buy this book and give it to as many people as possible!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    A little outdated but still had good information. Sometime the author went a little too far with his opinion, like when he was going on about the reason you couldn't get any gold 2000 quarters was because Walmart had them all. I have no clue where he was getting this information. I never had a issue getting them and I doubt Walmart really had an evil plan to lock them all up in a vault. Otherwise I felt his opinion and examples were quite good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    April

    Be careful... if you read this book your eyes may be opened and you won't save as much money anymore. However you will learn there is a price to pay for cheap.:) Since reading this book I RARELY shop at Walmart. I did a little research of my own as well and tend to agree with the author on many of the points in this book. I may pay a little more shopping elsewhere but I feel much better about it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    Yes it's dated, no it doesn't matter with the exception you can't look forward to a fourth edition from Quinn. I'd love to have another update and wish I'd found this in 98. It still gave me new ideas that I can't wait to share and implement. I recommend everyone take a few hours and see what they can learn about the Walton's business practices and what they mean for the economy in the long run.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James

    I read this book because I disagreed with the title. I thought maybe I would gain some insight. I didn't change my mind but it did help me solidify my thoughts and ideas. The margins of my book are full of comments and questions because I think the author misses the point of trade- voluntary exchange of goods and services to mutual advantage.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen Taylor

    The book definitely brings up some interesting points and even if you don't agree with all of them, you can't deny that the company is doing some things it shouldn't. It confirms my dislike of them and justifies my not shopping there...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    This was the first anti-Wal-Mart book I read. It was highly readable and eye-opening. It's almost too colloquial at times, but that's not a terrible thing. Anyone who thinks Wal-Mart is benign, or even worse: beneficial, should take a gander at this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    abby

    everyone should read it. reinforced my reasons to NOT ever shop at Walmart and to try really hard to shop locally

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leland

    This book was very satisfying, becasue I can't stand Walmart. He presents very good arguments for why we should not support this maga-retailer.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Yeah we get it, you're a socialist.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    There are better places to shop than Walmart!

  21. 5 out of 5

    bangkit aditya

    He tried to tell how evil Wal-Mart was. Since three decades ago, many moms-and-pops store forced to close itself cause of the unequal competition with that super store giant.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    OF course it's good! I wish Quinn would write an updated version though.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jostalady

    I won't shop at Walmart, I spread as much as I could from this information as I can and ask people not to get me stuff from Walmart.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janette

    Angry author, but there are a lot of studies out there which support his claims.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mck

    every page is chock full of reasons to hate walmart. if you spend a dime in their stores after reading this, shame on you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    James

    It appears that one of Walmart's main strategies is to maximize ruthlessly the amount of cost (tax, human/labor, environmental) that they can externalize. (More later...)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Listen America: STOP SHOPPING. We'll all be happier. Trust me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    This is a great little handbook full of quick go-to facts about Wal-Mart and case studies where effective anti-Wal-mart actions are being implemented. An update would be great.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    read it. Be sad. Be empowered. But most of all, be very, very afraid.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Farris

    This book is a real eye-opener to the predatory business practices of this megolomaniac.

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