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Alan Lewrie is a scandalous young rake whose amorous adventures ashore lead to his being shipped off to the Navy. Lewrie finds that he is a born sailor, although life at sea is a stark contrast to the London social whirl to which he had become accustomed. As his career advances, he finds the life of a naval officer suits him.


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Alan Lewrie is a scandalous young rake whose amorous adventures ashore lead to his being shipped off to the Navy. Lewrie finds that he is a born sailor, although life at sea is a stark contrast to the London social whirl to which he had become accustomed. As his career advances, he finds the life of a naval officer suits him.

30 review for The French Admiral

  1. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    A lot better character development than the first volume, but at the cost of pacing and action.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Simon Brading

    When Royal Navy officers take part in warfare on land it's usually a bit hit and miss and I end up wishing they'd just get back on their damn ships. That's not the case with this book, though, and, even though it takes place almost entirely off the water it remains (almost) as interesting. When Royal Navy officers take part in warfare on land it's usually a bit hit and miss and I end up wishing they'd just get back on their damn ships. That's not the case with this book, though, and, even though it takes place almost entirely off the water it remains (almost) as interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    I picked this up to sate my need for more Patrick O'Brian and while I would (and do) read each of the 21 over and over again, once of this Dewey Lambdin is enough for me. Lewrie spends quite a bit of energy trying to get ashore and into someone's bed in this book. While that in itself is not unusual for a sailor tale, it's the (too-high) level of details that turns me away from this character. Lewrie, as he gains his sea-legs through this book, matures as both man and sailor and it's that part of I picked this up to sate my need for more Patrick O'Brian and while I would (and do) read each of the 21 over and over again, once of this Dewey Lambdin is enough for me. Lewrie spends quite a bit of energy trying to get ashore and into someone's bed in this book. While that in itself is not unusual for a sailor tale, it's the (too-high) level of details that turns me away from this character. Lewrie, as he gains his sea-legs through this book, matures as both man and sailor and it's that part of the plot that redeems the book for me. Perhaps not surprisingly, his attitudes towards women matures through this timeline as well. There's some good adventure during the evacuation as he matures as a leader that bears some further inspection. And certainly there are some flashes of recognition from him that he is maturing in various forms along his journey. I liked this one enough to seek out the first in this series to see where Lewrie starts. Since I prefer the Lewrie at the end of The French Admiral to the beginning, I'm not certain if I will like The King's Coat any more than this one. Stay tuned, etc.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Miller

    great book , next please

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patrick SG

    I'm liking this series more and more. I find it a more natural and authentic version of the life of a British sailor in the Age of Sail. There's a liberal - but not gratuitous - use of profanity, and the action is realistic. I particularly liked this volume as it deals with the battle of Yorktown and related nautical events. It's a subject I know well having lived and worked there over the years as well as sailed and motored around the waters of the rivers and lower Chesapeake depicted. A chunk o I'm liking this series more and more. I find it a more natural and authentic version of the life of a British sailor in the Age of Sail. There's a liberal - but not gratuitous - use of profanity, and the action is realistic. I particularly liked this volume as it deals with the battle of Yorktown and related nautical events. It's a subject I know well having lived and worked there over the years as well as sailed and motored around the waters of the rivers and lower Chesapeake depicted. A chunk of the story even takes place around the Guinea Marshes of Gloucester County, showing the author has done his research well. Looking forward to following the travels and exploits of this young man through his naval career.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ian Kittle

    I have a great joy in reading historical books. Although this is a mere story taking place around 1780, concerning the actions of a Royal Navy vessel and the main character Alan Lewrie, it portrays a wealth of knowledge and research of life in those times. The harsh realities of life then. The story is very gripping and holds one to the last page. I wish now I had read the first book in the series first entitled “The Kings Coat” which presumably introduces the stories main character. The knowled I have a great joy in reading historical books. Although this is a mere story taking place around 1780, concerning the actions of a Royal Navy vessel and the main character Alan Lewrie, it portrays a wealth of knowledge and research of life in those times. The harsh realities of life then. The story is very gripping and holds one to the last page. I wish now I had read the first book in the series first entitled “The Kings Coat” which presumably introduces the stories main character. The knowledge and historical terms of sailing a British naval ship in this book were educational and fascinating. Life was cruel and harsh! A highly recommended read!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Uwe

    I was very surprised how good this book was. One of the best depictions of the Siege of Yorktown through the eyes of a British seaman. I also liked the pace of the book. Some may be put off by all of the sailing terms and descriptions, but as one who sails myself, I love it. I also liked the land battle scenes and the growth of the main character - Alan Lewrie. Some are uncomfortable with the the period thoughts and actions of the characters, but I feel that is how many gentried men may have tho I was very surprised how good this book was. One of the best depictions of the Siege of Yorktown through the eyes of a British seaman. I also liked the pace of the book. Some may be put off by all of the sailing terms and descriptions, but as one who sails myself, I love it. I also liked the land battle scenes and the growth of the main character - Alan Lewrie. Some are uncomfortable with the the period thoughts and actions of the characters, but I feel that is how many gentried men may have thought and acted at the time. Bravo for a fantastic book. Better than the first and I am looking forward to reading Book 3 - The King's Commission.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Alan Lewrie is a scandalous young rake whose amorous adventures ashore lead to his being shipped off to the Navy. Lewrie finds that he is a born sailor, although life at sea is a stark contrast to the London social whirl to which he had become accustomed. As his career advances, he finds the life of a naval officer suits him. I really like these naval novels with their techno-speak and swashbuckling and such, but the language is pretty rough- f-bombs more than cannon shot and profanity. Sex scene Alan Lewrie is a scandalous young rake whose amorous adventures ashore lead to his being shipped off to the Navy. Lewrie finds that he is a born sailor, although life at sea is a stark contrast to the London social whirl to which he had become accustomed. As his career advances, he finds the life of a naval officer suits him. I really like these naval novels with their techno-speak and swashbuckling and such, but the language is pretty rough- f-bombs more than cannon shot and profanity. Sex scenes are not detailed- typical of how male authors write, for some reason.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike Stewart

    Alan Lewrie's career continues and culminates in his promotion to master's mate and awareness of his commitment to a naval career. This volume finds Lewrie at Yorktown and adventures both on land and sea ensue. Not as much fun as the first volume, but nevertheless worthwhile. Lewrie remains an interesting character - part Jack Aubrey, part Tom Jones. Some readers might be surprised by Lambdin's portrayal of the uglier aspects of the American Revolution which, particularly in the South, was as muc Alan Lewrie's career continues and culminates in his promotion to master's mate and awareness of his commitment to a naval career. This volume finds Lewrie at Yorktown and adventures both on land and sea ensue. Not as much fun as the first volume, but nevertheless worthwhile. Lewrie remains an interesting character - part Jack Aubrey, part Tom Jones. Some readers might be surprised by Lambdin's portrayal of the uglier aspects of the American Revolution which, particularly in the South, was as much civil and class war as revolution.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    The refreshing caddishness of the first book is still there, giving Alan Lewrie's character real persona, but in this novel he distinctly matures and grows up. Indeed there is a significant sprinkling of real leadership evident. The plot takes place mainly on land fighting as a soldier rather than as a sailor. Whilst this is handled significantly better than many other naval authors I still yearned for him to get back to sea. It will be interesting to see how his career unfolds and how his leader The refreshing caddishness of the first book is still there, giving Alan Lewrie's character real persona, but in this novel he distinctly matures and grows up. Indeed there is a significant sprinkling of real leadership evident. The plot takes place mainly on land fighting as a soldier rather than as a sailor. Whilst this is handled significantly better than many other naval authors I still yearned for him to get back to sea. It will be interesting to see how his career unfolds and how his leadership in later books is forged by his own experience earlier on.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Second book in the series. Alan Lewrie has now been a midshipman in the Royal Navy for 2 years. His captain hates him because of the events that forced Lewrie to join the navy. Now their ship is off Chesapeake Bay in 1781 in support of General Cornwallis in Yorktown, and we all know how that turned out. Excellent naval adventure and a fair bit of American history. Well worth reading. Looking forward to the next in the series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sunhawk

    I find these stories captivating. There's insight here into history I didn't know, or that I did know in the high school establishment approved version but seen from a different angle (and with the delicious perspective provided by seeing it from the eventual outcome). I'll continue reading this series with pleasure ...even though it really is brain-candy. after all, what's "pleasure reading" all about, if not that? I find these stories captivating. There's insight here into history I didn't know, or that I did know in the high school establishment approved version but seen from a different angle (and with the delicious perspective provided by seeing it from the eventual outcome). I'll continue reading this series with pleasure ...even though it really is brain-candy. after all, what's "pleasure reading" all about, if not that?

  13. 4 out of 5

    john temple

    A thoroughly enjoyable read The main character, Alan Lewrie is starting to find his sea legs and knowledge in this latest book in the series. He still ruminates about his actions and his real dread of action is all too real. There is some horrific descriptions of atrocities that took place in the American war of independence and the author doesn't fight why of the reasons behind the victory. All in all a thoroughly enjoyable romp through naval life in the 1700s A thoroughly enjoyable read The main character, Alan Lewrie is starting to find his sea legs and knowledge in this latest book in the series. He still ruminates about his actions and his real dread of action is all too real. There is some horrific descriptions of atrocities that took place in the American war of independence and the author doesn't fight why of the reasons behind the victory. All in all a thoroughly enjoyable romp through naval life in the 1700s

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Hull

    I’ve just found another (new to me) favourite author! Amazing narrative of nautical jargon throughout - although I have no idea what most of it means it nonetheless provided an extremely exciting account of the day-to-day life on sea and land during the (US) Revolutionary War during the late 1700’s. We’re presented with ‘The Alan Lewrie Naval Adventures’, one of a series of novels, all of which, I’m sure, are as captivating as this one has been. I can hardly wait to read the rest!

  15. 4 out of 5

    John DeLargy Jr

    The Fantastic 2nd Chapter Dewey Lambdin has created a story that has totally captured my heart and mind. This installment is close to being my favorite as our hero Allen not only grows up on the outside but on the inside. His realizing that he is worth more important than he realizes is heartfelt and I found myself cheering for him as I read. Thank you Mr Lambdin. Your work is well done.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tonya DeLargy

    Godspeed Alan Lewrie Part 2 of this series captures the excitement of youth and the changing life a young teenager who is turning into a man. I absolutely love this series and this book has been and will continue to be recommended by myself for as long as breadth is within me. Thank You Mr Lambdin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonatan

    Finished In a couple nights! Read from 2 to 6 one night which was not a good idea as E woke at 7. Great adventure again with some insight inte the botched skirmishes of the brittish during the war for independence in the NA colonies. Alan spends a lot of time on land, and commands a bark to evacuate loyalists. How can I resist? Must have more!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Liv

    This type of book is not really my style - I was given it as a gift and was apprehensive about reading it. However, I did find myself enjoying it, despite the fact that it is a) the second book in a series and b) not my preferred book type. I would recommend but probably not read any further into the series due to personal preference.

  19. 4 out of 5

    09/01

    Onwards to the next one Thoroughly enjoyed reading the continuing saga of Alan Lewrie. A well written storyline and plenty of action,and background to the U.S. war of independence. Enjoy I did.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Donald Moore

    Chesapeake A good read with details of the American civil war, not always made clear. Still a navel yarn of interesting detail and life at sea.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Arthur John Lee

    So far this is the third Lewrie book i am reading and enjoying it just as much as the other keep it up Dewey.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ian Pruce

    Will have to find the next few stories about Alan Lewrie. More graphic than similar stories.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I really enjoyed this book which centred on character development of Alan Lewrie it is a compelling read

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Storebø

    Hard to put down Good story with loads of drama pushing into the next books in the series. I thoroughly enjoyed it though I miss him being in the rigging as a midshipman.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Brown

    Unique exploration of Yorktown from the British side This book is worth reading if only for its detailed examination of the British situation at Yorktown. It is also a substantial improvement on the first volume, for those who felt it had too much graphic sex; that's been dialed back. In this volume, the Flashman-like cad Midshipman is starting to gain his sealegs and wonder whether he may have found his calling ... at least until there is enough prize money to secure a place among the gentry. Unique exploration of Yorktown from the British side This book is worth reading if only for its detailed examination of the British situation at Yorktown. It is also a substantial improvement on the first volume, for those who felt it had too much graphic sex; that's been dialed back. In this volume, the Flashman-like cad Midshipman is starting to gain his sealegs and wonder whether he may have found his calling ... at least until there is enough prize money to secure a place among the gentry.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric_W

    Alan Lewrie, Lambdin's reprobate midshipman brat and amoral waistrel, becomes a more than competent seaman in this second of the series. Lambdin ranks right up with Forester and O'Brian as one of the best writers of nautical fiction taking place during the late eighteenth century. Lambdin, an American, writes from the perspective of the British as they find themselves on the losing end of battles with American terrorists and rebels. It struck me again, while reading this, how wars are defined by Alan Lewrie, Lambdin's reprobate midshipman brat and amoral waistrel, becomes a more than competent seaman in this second of the series. Lambdin ranks right up with Forester and O'Brian as one of the best writers of nautical fiction taking place during the late eighteenth century. Lambdin, an American, writes from the perspective of the British as they find themselves on the losing end of battles with American terrorists and rebels. It struck me again, while reading this, how wars are defined by the victors, for surely what we proudly name the "Revolutionary War" was by all accounts nothing more than the first American civil war. And a bloody war it was, with terrible atrocities committed by both sides. Lambdin doesn't gloss over these dark aspects, and this volume has much less of the high humor contained in The King's Coat, the introductory novel to the series. Alan and the crew of the Desperate find themselves assisting British (actually everyone was British, so they really might better be called Loyalists) forces at Yorktown. Their forces are ill-equipped to deal with the guerrilla tactics of the rebels, and a sense of hopelessness pervades the Redcoat army. The cause seems futile and the French Admiral DeGrasse's fleet, in a Kafkaesque element, hovers threateningly in the background, a huge threat, but never actually makes an appearance. The fall of Yorktown reminds one eerily of Bataan and Singapore. Very few escaped. Alan and some North Carolina volunteers that he was transporting across the bay away from Yorktown in an attempt to escape , are blown off course during a storm and forced to fight their way out, even though Cornwallis has surrendered the main army. Alan and two officers, the Chiswick brothers, become good friends and after fighting their way out of a plantation where they had taken refuge, Alan makes it back to the Desperate. He takes a message to the family of the Chiswicks, finding them in penury, all their possessions having been confiscated by rebels. The daughter, Caroline, is, of course, quite attractive, if a bit thin, not to mention lithe. Alan helps them find passage out of Wilmington on the Desperate, his overactive libido in full force, but soon the captain is wooing Caroline, and that leads to a funny dialogue between Alan and Mr. Monk, the ship's master: When asked if it was rather unusual for captains to have women on board, Monk laughs and tells of one captain, Augustus Harvey, who, when a young post captain, "must have made sport with over two hundred women in one commission, duchesses, servant girls, and two nuns to top it off." The French admiral De Grasse, always in the background as a menacing figure, never actually appears, and Lambdin has harsh words for the failure of the British admirals to attack him head on. They defeated De Grasse easily later; had they done so earlier, the war might have ended differently. In his historical notes, Lambdin notes that the atrocities described in the book are well documented, and fear of rebel terrorist acts forced many Loyalist's families to flee to Canada.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

    This is the second installment in what is developing into quite an enjoyable naval series. In The King’s Coat, Alan Lewrie, an illegitimate sixteen-year-old London rakehell, was essentially forced into going to sea in 1779 as a midshipman after being framed by his moneygrubbing father and his two half-siblings. He had a very rocky start in his new career but was beginning to learn his trade and had made a few friends, as well as more than a few enemies. He had also managed to come to the notice This is the second installment in what is developing into quite an enjoyable naval series. In The King’s Coat, Alan Lewrie, an illegitimate sixteen-year-old London rakehell, was essentially forced into going to sea in 1779 as a midshipman after being framed by his moneygrubbing father and his two half-siblings. He had a very rocky start in his new career but was beginning to learn his trade and had made a few friends, as well as more than a few enemies. He had also managed to come to the notice of at least two men of note, and well-place interest was always paramount in advancing one’s naval future. And there was the gorgeous young Lucy Beauman in Antiqua to whom he began paying court. Now it’s two years since he left England and the rebellion in America is drawing to a close, buoyed by incompetence on the part of the British army and navy. And in the process, Alan finds himself trapped like a rat with Cornwallis at Yorktown. He escapes the disaster, partly through chance, partly through the aid of some Loyalist militia, and partly through his own intelligence and unexpected competence. By the end of the book, his future has improved in several important ways, both professionally and personally, and he has become a harder sort of person than he was at the beginning. And there’s a new love interest, whether he wants to think so or not. Lambdin offers a welcome antidote to the rather proper style of Hornblower and even Audrey -- his sailors swear fulsomely, his protagonists can be just as narrowminded as anyone else in their society -- but he certainly knows his naval lore. And just when you’re settling in to an adventurous episode, something horrible happens to remind you of just how bloody a true civil war the glorious American Revolution really was.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katisha

    This is the second book in the Alan Lewrie stories. It covers actions in and around Yorktown, America, during the (American) Revolution. The hero, Alan Lewrie, stumbles and whores his way to glory and becomes a more experienced seaman and combatant in the process. I still find Lewrie a relatively unsympathetic 'hero', but the character has a wry wit and his tale is an interesting one, well told. I am not familiar with the historical facts of the era this book is set in, but assuming they are accu This is the second book in the Alan Lewrie stories. It covers actions in and around Yorktown, America, during the (American) Revolution. The hero, Alan Lewrie, stumbles and whores his way to glory and becomes a more experienced seaman and combatant in the process. I still find Lewrie a relatively unsympathetic 'hero', but the character has a wry wit and his tale is an interesting one, well told. I am not familiar with the historical facts of the era this book is set in, but assuming they are accurately portrayed here it's no wonder the revolutionaries achieved their goals. It's intriguing seeing both naval and land battles written from the viewpoint of the eventual losers. Despite the author being n American, the tales are told sympathetically and one still roots for the English and their allies as a consequence. I find I have developed almost as great an interest in naval artillery as our hero Lewrie. This second book is far less tied up by naval language, though, than the first and thus flows better. I recommend it if you would like to read a more gritty, less glorified, story of the British Navy at their most interesting than you might find in other similar series. I like the author's telling of things and I am already devouring the next book at a pace. Apparently some earlier additions were misprinted in the latter part, but the cover shown is the latest edition and has no such errors in it. A cracking read, very enjoyable and compelling. I recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    “The French Admiral” is book two in Dewey Lambdin’s Alan Lewrie series. Lewrie was sent off by his father to the Royal Navy. Alan finds he is a born sailor and is enjoying his life at sea. As a Midshipman we find him in this book at the siege of Yorktown, near the end of the American Revolutionary War. The Royal Navy, with heavily-armed frigates, is posed to break the French blockade. The French Navy is commanded by Admiral de Grasse. Lewrie is aboard HMS Desperate. Midshipman Lewrie is in charge “The French Admiral” is book two in Dewey Lambdin’s Alan Lewrie series. Lewrie was sent off by his father to the Royal Navy. Alan finds he is a born sailor and is enjoying his life at sea. As a Midshipman we find him in this book at the siege of Yorktown, near the end of the American Revolutionary War. The Royal Navy, with heavily-armed frigates, is posed to break the French blockade. The French Navy is commanded by Admiral de Grasse. Lewrie is aboard HMS Desperate. Midshipman Lewrie is in charge of 24 pounder guns firing broadsides at the French vessels. The book is well written and researched but I am still having trouble liking the hero of the book Alan Lewrie. I shall read a few more books in the series while I look for another series about the Royal Navy vs. Napoleon. I read this book as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. One of my favorite narrators, John Lee is narrating the book. That alone keeps me listening.

  30. 4 out of 5

    jallioop

    Enjoyed this. Not much naval action, rather is about one small piece of the battle of Yorktown. I will probably research more about the involvement of naval guns in the siege - wonder whether any part of the story is based on truth. Other reviewers have remarked on the anachronisms in the language. I tend not to focus on such details, but there was one that was totally jarring - Alan worries that he would be blown to "atoms" by the rebel shelling - he must've been quite precocious to be worrying Enjoyed this. Not much naval action, rather is about one small piece of the battle of Yorktown. I will probably research more about the involvement of naval guns in the siege - wonder whether any part of the story is based on truth. Other reviewers have remarked on the anachronisms in the language. I tend not to focus on such details, but there was one that was totally jarring - Alan worries that he would be blown to "atoms" by the rebel shelling - he must've been quite precocious to be worrying about his atomic bits in 1781! I agree with the author's afterward, that much of the writing about the Revolutionary War focuses on the battles of New England, NY, PA and NJ. Enjoyed hearing just a bit about the southern theater, although from Alan's viewpoint we see only a very small slice of things. Particularly enjoyed the Chiswick brother characters.

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