counter create hit Understanding the Koran: A Quick Christian Guide to the Muslim Holy Book - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Understanding the Koran: A Quick Christian Guide to the Muslim Holy Book

Availability: Ready to download

What You Should Know about Islam’s Holy Book How is it like the Bible? How is it different? Why is it important? Muslims believe the Koran exists as a literal book in heaven and was dictated to the prophet Muhammad by the angel Gabriel. It is only the length of the New Testament, yet a fifth of the world claims it is the complete revelation of God. To most Americans, thoug What You Should Know about Islam’s Holy Book How is it like the Bible? How is it different? Why is it important? Muslims believe the Koran exists as a literal book in heaven and was dictated to the prophet Muhammad by the angel Gabriel. It is only the length of the New Testament, yet a fifth of the world claims it is the complete revelation of God. To most Americans, though, the Koran remains a mystery. Did you know that the Koran teaches the virgin birth and miracle-filled, prophetic ministry of Jesus? Claims to fully embrace his teachings? Reveres Abraham, Moses, Jonah, and other biblical prophets? Find out how the Koran resembles the Bible—and the drastic ways in which it differs. Understanding the Koran gives you a fascinating essential grasp of Islam’s holy book: where it came from, what it teaches, how Muslims view it, and how the Allah of the Koran compares with the God of the Bible. Cherished as the final, perfect revelation of God’s will by 1.2 billion Muslims worldwide, the Koran has become a part of American life. Today, those who read and memorize it may work in your town, shop where you shop, or send their children to the same school your kids attend. What do you know about the holy book that shapes the lives and eternal destinies of your neighbors and a fifth of the world’s population? While some similarities exist between the Koran and the Bible, the differences are striking. Written by a pastor who was born to a Muslim father and raised in Saudi Arabia, Understanding the Koran gives you a fascinating, easy-to-understand overview that will show you: •Why the background behind the Koran is important •How the Koran came into existence •A summary of the main teachings of the Koran, including what it says about Jesus and the crucifixion •Similarities and differences between Muslim and Christian views of God •What the Koran teaches about Jihad and holy war •What the Koran teaches about heaven and hell More than furnishing you with an essential grasp of Islam’s holy book, Understanding the Koran points you to the one thing that can draw your Muslim friends to Jesus—his love, demonstrated to them through you. Discussion questions enable you to use this book in group studies


Compare

What You Should Know about Islam’s Holy Book How is it like the Bible? How is it different? Why is it important? Muslims believe the Koran exists as a literal book in heaven and was dictated to the prophet Muhammad by the angel Gabriel. It is only the length of the New Testament, yet a fifth of the world claims it is the complete revelation of God. To most Americans, thoug What You Should Know about Islam’s Holy Book How is it like the Bible? How is it different? Why is it important? Muslims believe the Koran exists as a literal book in heaven and was dictated to the prophet Muhammad by the angel Gabriel. It is only the length of the New Testament, yet a fifth of the world claims it is the complete revelation of God. To most Americans, though, the Koran remains a mystery. Did you know that the Koran teaches the virgin birth and miracle-filled, prophetic ministry of Jesus? Claims to fully embrace his teachings? Reveres Abraham, Moses, Jonah, and other biblical prophets? Find out how the Koran resembles the Bible—and the drastic ways in which it differs. Understanding the Koran gives you a fascinating essential grasp of Islam’s holy book: where it came from, what it teaches, how Muslims view it, and how the Allah of the Koran compares with the God of the Bible. Cherished as the final, perfect revelation of God’s will by 1.2 billion Muslims worldwide, the Koran has become a part of American life. Today, those who read and memorize it may work in your town, shop where you shop, or send their children to the same school your kids attend. What do you know about the holy book that shapes the lives and eternal destinies of your neighbors and a fifth of the world’s population? While some similarities exist between the Koran and the Bible, the differences are striking. Written by a pastor who was born to a Muslim father and raised in Saudi Arabia, Understanding the Koran gives you a fascinating, easy-to-understand overview that will show you: •Why the background behind the Koran is important •How the Koran came into existence •A summary of the main teachings of the Koran, including what it says about Jesus and the crucifixion •Similarities and differences between Muslim and Christian views of God •What the Koran teaches about Jihad and holy war •What the Koran teaches about heaven and hell More than furnishing you with an essential grasp of Islam’s holy book, Understanding the Koran points you to the one thing that can draw your Muslim friends to Jesus—his love, demonstrated to them through you. Discussion questions enable you to use this book in group studies

30 review for Understanding the Koran: A Quick Christian Guide to the Muslim Holy Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rod Horncastle

    This does claim to be a QUICK Christian guide to the Koran. And it mostly succeeds. You will get a pretty good idea about Islam from this little gem. Muslims will hate it of course - it fails to match their propaganda - too bad. This book basically destroys Islam and the Koran. Cheers! I love the title of chapter 3: "And the Word Became...Paper?" That is very true. Muslims often claim the Koran is much more than just religious words recorded in print. Some even claim the Koran was sent down from This does claim to be a QUICK Christian guide to the Koran. And it mostly succeeds. You will get a pretty good idea about Islam from this little gem. Muslims will hate it of course - it fails to match their propaganda - too bad. This book basically destroys Islam and the Koran. Cheers! I love the title of chapter 3: "And the Word Became...Paper?" That is very true. Muslims often claim the Koran is much more than just religious words recorded in print. Some even claim the Koran was sent down from Heaven (Houris, Hellish tortures, 4 wives, endless violence, and poorly understood Christian theology and Bible stories). Now that's embarrassing. I sure hope those up in Paradise can do a better job than that. The author Mateen Elass sure knows his stuff. He seemed to include every complaint i've rounded up after reading the entire Koran. Even the fact that the Koran is simply not enough information to establish any kind of history and Cosmic Truth. One of my biggest pet peeves is that the Koran really doesn't explain what JINN are? Are they angels? Demons? Freaky others? Spirit brothers from the beyond? Muslims really don't know - they can only guess, and then DEMAND that you acknowledge the brilliance and Islamic truth of their guess. Yeah, none of this leads to peace and love. This book will take you through many problems in the Koran. Muslims of course claim there are no problems. Until they get caught in polygamy in another culture... whoops! Or fail to mention the violence applied to any who question their Sharia Law or Religious truth. But the Koran is filled with serious issues that most Muslims desperately want to sweep under the rug. That is why I ignore the Hadith accounts of Muhammad and Islamic history and culture... just focus on the crap in the Koran. There is really no peace offered in the Koran: unless you pay the bully tax and submit to the oppression of the Islamic empire - then you will have sweet peace. Just kidding, then the real abuse will start. And the Koran even mentions this abuse. Especially for Christians who commit the evil hell-deserving sin of calling Jesus "Our God and Savior and eternal King". Yep, or even worse, a Muslim who becomes a Christian deserves DEATH - Peace indeed. If you doubt me: go join a Mosque, be a Muslim for a few days - then become a Christian infront of them. Watch the violence and abuse (that they claim is peace and love???) rise to the top of their priorities. There is nothing peaceful about Islam - if in doubt, turn on your local News...everywhere there is Islam and the Koran: there is violence and abuse and oppression. It all comes from one book: The Koran. But they are not our enemies: they are our mission field. We love and pray for Muslims daily to find God's truth and escape this medieval cult that destroys everything Jesus intends for humanity. We need people to befriend Muslims, work with them, offer aid, give them hope and joy...but we also need a few people like me and Mateen Elass to be very clear about what exactly Islam is. Not pleasant - but very necessary. Many great essential topics are quickly dealt with in this book; Like whether Allah of the Koran and God - the Father of the Bible, are the same deity. In some small very lazy ways maybe a few similarities are acceptable. But truthfully: NO. Jesus is God and Savior of the Bible and Christianity. Allah of the Koran says we must save ourselves and not accept Jesus as a partner or Lamb slain for the sins of the world. I enjoyed the part where Mateen discusses all of the borrowed and distorted bits of the Bible that made it into the Koran. Most people don't know that Moses, David, Abraham, Isaac, Jesus, Adam, Joseph, Elijah etc made it into the Koran. Only small bits of the story (I wonder how many Muslims have gone to the Bible to read all the missing information - over a thousand pages that the Koran failed to mention). Often the stories in the Koran barely make sense: like Job and Jonah being reduced to a few mere verses. But honestly I think the Koranic explanation of Islamic hell would be enough for any humanitarian to say "WHAT THE FREAKIN' HELL?" In Islam, Allah doesn't merely send people to hell - he tortures them in many grotesque and seemingly endless scenarios of Hollywood horror slasher psycho films. It is one thing to be a divine God and Judge...it's another to just be sick and evil. The Bible is very careful about the content of hell - we shouldn't use our imaginations to go beyond what scripture states. But Muhammad seemed to relish the idea that anyone who disagrees with him will be personally abused beyond... So for all those liberal politicians and people who think Islam should be tolerated and lovingly embraced as an alternative Abrahamic faith: please read this book (and my review). Islam is a danger to life as we know it. By the time people see the horror of it - it will be too late. Thankfully there are millions of moderate Muslims who haven't YET joined the full oppression of Islam - but they soon will. Now go read David Garrison's A Wind In The House Of Islam. Or Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity by Nabeel Qureshi.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    Pluses and minuses here. This book is a short guide to the Koran/ Quran for people trying to get an overview. I read it at the same time as I read the Koran itself. This is probably most helpful for Christians. The author was raised Islamic and converted to Christianity so he's mostly respectful towards Islam. I found the author to be biased at times though because of his strong Christian affiliation. Rather than cite historical or academic arguments, the author typically relied on Christian evi Pluses and minuses here. This book is a short guide to the Koran/ Quran for people trying to get an overview. I read it at the same time as I read the Koran itself. This is probably most helpful for Christians. The author was raised Islamic and converted to Christianity so he's mostly respectful towards Islam. I found the author to be biased at times though because of his strong Christian affiliation. Rather than cite historical or academic arguments, the author typically relied on Christian evidence, so I didn't think it was a good book if you're trying to understand the greater history. Still, it was a concise overview of the actual book of the Koran, some Islamic religious beliefs, with some cultural context from a reliable ex-practitioner.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dalia

    This is a great resource if you want to learn what Islam is about outside of the media's depiction. I met the author. He is a former muslim who came to the States to study and ultimately found Christ and is now a Presbyterian minister. Elass does a very good job of comparing the tenets of each religion and drawing parallels as well as pointing out how different they are. This is a must-read for anyone who wishes to have a better understanding of Islam. This is a great resource if you want to learn what Islam is about outside of the media's depiction. I met the author. He is a former muslim who came to the States to study and ultimately found Christ and is now a Presbyterian minister. Elass does a very good job of comparing the tenets of each religion and drawing parallels as well as pointing out how different they are. This is a must-read for anyone who wishes to have a better understanding of Islam.

  4. 4 out of 5

    .M(^-__-^)M_ken_M(^-__-^)M.

    Understanding the Koran: A Quick Christian Guide to the Muslim Holy Book (Audiobook) interesting beyond the fact I knew very little about the Koran.

  5. 4 out of 5

    محمّد فؤاد

    تا برام درس بشه بچسبم به کتابایی که با پرس‌وجو پیدا کردم، و هر چی سر راهم قرار گرفت رو نخوندم.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim Baumgartner

    This book has LOTS of nuggets a person can learn about the Koran. I share some notes from each chapter, since ALL won't fit. One REALLY frustrating thing is the author quoted various hadith [sayings/traditions of Muhammad from Sahih Sitta--the Authentic Six hadith according to Sunni Muslims, which is roughly 85% of Muslims in the world] is that if the author uses a reference, and I look it up online, it doesn't match up. Now, the author is not lying, it's just that Islam, as a whole, has not esta This book has LOTS of nuggets a person can learn about the Koran. I share some notes from each chapter, since ALL won't fit. One REALLY frustrating thing is the author quoted various hadith [sayings/traditions of Muhammad from Sahih Sitta--the Authentic Six hadith according to Sunni Muslims, which is roughly 85% of Muslims in the world] is that if the author uses a reference, and I look it up online, it doesn't match up. Now, the author is not lying, it's just that Islam, as a whole, has not established a universal system for referencing all the various hadith. I spent WAY more time than I want to admit on searching different web sites that include various hadiths (Sunnah.com; Alim.org; Hadithcollection.com; etc.). Ch. 1: The Koran Through Muslim Eyes At Al-Azhar University in Cairo, the oldest continuously existing university in the world, one of the requirements for graduation is that each student must be prepared to successfully recite the entire Koran from memory. (14) “He who is an expert in the Koran shall rank with the ‘Honored Righteous Scribes,’ and he who reads the Koran with difficulty and gets tired over it [i.e., expends much honorable effort] shall receive double rewards” (al-Bukhari, 6.459). (17) The Day the Music was Silenced [The author’s father died and while in Syria, mourning took place in silence, but soft traditional music was being played in the reception hall that was adjacent to the mosque. So, during breaks, some would go to the mosque and the Quran was being recited, and music was overheard. It led to an argument and the more conservative interpretation won the day—no music! Worship must be done in silence [unlike Christianity!] (19-20] Ch. 2: Where Did the Koran Come From? Then the Prophet repeated the words with a trembling heart. And he returned to Khadijah, and said, “Wrap me up, wrap me up.” And they wrapped him up in a garment until his fear was dispelled; and he told Khadijah what had occurred, and he said to Khadijah, “I was afraid I should die.” Then Khadijah said, “No, it will not be so, I swear by God. He will never make thee melancholy or sad. For you are kind to your relatives, you speak the truth, you are faithful in trust, you bear the afflictions of the people, you spend in good works what you gain in trade, you are hospitable, and you assist your fellow men.”^1 [Hughes, Thomas Patrick, Dictionary of Islam (London: W.H. Allen & Co., 1935), 370-71.] (22-23) [Source is ALSO: Sahih Muslim 1.160 a; Book 1, Hadith 310 or 301 [Ch. 73 also mentioned in line above & link! https://sunnah.com/muslim/1] A significant gap of time ensued between this first vision and subsequent heavenly visits, during which Muhammad grew greatly depressed, fearing that God either hated or had forsaken him. The Hadith of al-Bukhari (9:111) records that during this time span, Muhammad contemplated suicide by throwing himself off a cliff. Finally, however, the angel is said to have returned and addressed the fledgling prophet again, “O thou enwrapped in thy mantle, arise and preach.” Further instruction from this encounter is found in Sura^2 [Surah] 74. (23) [http://www.alim.org/library/hadith/SH...] Can Translations Be Trusted? …palm fronds, bones, paper or even stone (28) …the story goes that Muhammad was taken up through the first seven levels of heaven… At the highest level, Allah is said to have spoken to Muhammad directly … all Muslims were to perform the rituals of prayer fifty times a day. Moses (residing in the sixth level of heaven) inquired of Muhammad what Allah had commanded of him, and after being told convinced Muhammad that the burden would be far too great for the people. He urged Muhammad to return to Allah and bargain on behalf of his people, which he did. After five bargaining sessions, the prayer requirement was reduced from fifty to five. (31) A Perfect Book Without Error? …the Koran does admit that Muhammad at times corrected some of his earlier revelations after discovering that he had somehow “gotten it wrong.” So Sura 2:100 has Allah declaring, “If we abrogate (32) a verse or consign it to oblivion, we offer something better than it or something of equal value.” Astonishingly, Muhammad never seemed troubled by the inconsistency of affirming that the Koran is the perfect replica of the eternal book of God while at the same time declaring that at times God must reshape or annul earlier revelations. (33) … “the satanic verses” …made familiar to the West through Salman Rushdie’s 1988 novel by that name. (33) But this [that Allah DID protect] raises a further question: If God is so careful to protect the transmission of his truth through Muhammad into its final form in the Koran, why would he not have been equally careful to protect the truth he delivered through previous prophets? (34) Ch. 3: And the Word Became… Paper? The Hadith al-Bukhari (5:155) declares that four Muslims had memorized the entirety of Koranic revelations. [I COULDN’T find that reference, but I found it in al-Bukhari Vol. 6, Book 61, #510: https://www.sahih-bukhari.com/Pages/B...] [https://sunnah.com/bukhari/66]=Sahih al-Bukhari 4987, Book 66, Hadith 9, Vol. 6, Book 61, Hadith 510] [http://www.alim.org/library/hadith/SH...] [al-Bukhari 5:155] So I started looking for the Qur'an and collecting it from (what was written on) palmed stalks, thin white stones and also from the men who knew it by heart, till I found the last Verse of Surat At-Tauba (Repentance) with Abi Khuzaima Al-Ansari, and I did not find it with anybody other than him. The Verse is: "Verily there has come unto you an Apostle (Muhammad) from amongst yourselves. It grieves him that you should receive any injury or difficulty...(till the end of Surat-Baraa' (At-Tauba). (9.128-129). Then the complete manuscripts (copy) of the Qur'an remained with Abu Bakr till he died, then with 'Umar till the end of his life, and then with Hafsa, the daughter of 'Umar. [http://www.alim.org/library/hadith/SH...] (41-42) Variations throughout the Empire and a Uniform Text According to Muslim historical sources, four other major recensions of the Koran, each based on the memory of a highly respected member of the qurra’ residing in a vital city, were gaining popularity in their respective regions: the version of Ubaiy bin K’ab in Damascus, that of Ibn (43) Mas’ud in Kufa, that of Mikdad bin ‘Amr in Hims, and that of al-Ash’ari in Basra. (al-Bukhari 6:510) http://www.alim.org/library/hadith/SH... This tradition indicates that there were significant numbers of whole collections or fragmentary manuscripts of the Koran in existence during the time when Zaid’s compilation was kept in private by Abu Bakr and Umar. (44) Trying to Explain Differences Muslim apologists sometimes argue at this point that the differences with regard to the Koran around the empire dealt only with variations in how the text was recited, not with differences in the written text itself. However, if the differences were merely a matter of variant pronunciations of an identical text, such a problem would not be solved by sending to all parts of the empire the same written text that they presumably already had. But, these apologists counter, early Arabic was a fully consonantal language. The writing of the Koran was built on the use of early Arabic’s seventeen consonantal letters. However, when diacritical points are added, the number of distinct letters increases to twenty-nine. On top of that, only when further vowel pointings are added to the consonants does one know exactly how the written words are to be pronounced and understood. Perhaps, say the apologists, this is what Zaid’s (45) revised edition was meant to do—enable Muslims across the expanding empire to know exactly which letters and vowels were intended in the uniform written text that they presumably already had. But this viewpoint runs counter to the facts. If the issue were simply one of diacritical marks, these could easily have been added or changed without burning the other extant [surviving] manuscripts. Even more telling…All of the earliest manuscripts in existence were written with no diacriticals. Indeed, there are no examples of Korans with full pointing until more than two hundred years after the death of Muhammad, or one hundred and eighty some years after Zaid’s version (46) became the standardized text of Islam. (47) Unfortunately, Muhammad never clarified which seven alternate reading patterns were inspired… However, in 934, two hundred years after Muhammad’s death, a highly regarded Islamic authority with the backing of well-placed jurists determined to bring clarity and finality to this issue. He wrote a book declaring seven of the current readings to be the legitimate ones and all others to be discarded as incorrect. (51) … most Korans today contain the Uthmanic consonantal text with diacriticals and vowel pointing known as the Asim or Hafs reading. Ch. 4: Will the Real Jesus Please Stand Up? Islamic tradition also holds that Mary was raised in the temple under the watchful eye of Zechariah (chosen from among other priests by the casting of the lots), who would later become the father of John the Baptist. Where might Muhammad have come up with these accounts? Not surprisingly, in Christian apocryphal literature of the centuries preceding Muhammad a number of stories embellish the life of Mary … (see, for example, the Protoevangelium of James the Less, written centuries before the birth of Muhammad, which contains clear and undeniable parallels to the Koranic account). It is highly likely that Muhammad heard these stories among the Nestorian Christian (56) tribes of the Arabian peninsula (57) Both 3:49 and 5:113 refer to another extracanonical miracle that in the Koran becomes a sign to demonstrate Jesus’ apostleship to the Jews. God appoints Jesus to this position and gives him a particular message for Israel: “I have come to you with a sign from your Lord, in that I make for you out of clay, as it were, the figure of a bird, and breathe into it, and it becomes a bird by God’s leave.” Interestingly, both the Infancy Gospel of Thomas and the Protoevangelium of James, composed at the latest in the third century A.D., contain accounts of Jesus as a five-year-old boy shaping twelve sparrows out of mud or clay and then miraculously giving them life. It is reasonable to speculate that Muhammad heard Christians telling these apocryphal stories and incorporated them into his personal portrait of Jesus. (59) Ch. 5: Not All Texts are Created Equal Additionally, the Koran as a whole is divided into thirty parts of roughly equal lengths so as to help the obedient Muslim who wishes to recite the entire Koran during the thirty days of Ramadan. Each of these parts is called a juz in Arabic (or siparah in Persian). …the Koran is also divided into seven partitions (called manzils in Persian), so that the Koran may be recited fully in one week. Finally, the Koran is also divided into three large blocks so that one may be totally immersed in the whole text over three days. Ch. 6: Is Allah a False God? …helping Muslims to discover that they do not have to settle sim- (92) ply for knowing about God but that they can know God personally in and through Jesus Christ. [See book I Dared to Call Him Father] Chs. 7-8: Streams in the Desert: Jewish and Christian Sources in the Quran These contain various stories of mostly biblical characters, but they often emphasize or include things that are not in the Bible. Ch. 9: Descriptions of Heaven and Hell There are a BUNCH of descriptions for both, but not enough space here. Ch. 10: What is the Path of Jihad? Four Stages in Muhammad’s Teaching 1. Peaceful Persuasion See Sura 16:125-6 Many Muslims today regard this as the proper approach for the Muslim community any time it finds itself the overwhelming minority in an unreceptive host culture. (147) 2. Warding Off Aggression When Muhammad fled Mecca in 622 [the Hijrah], the movement grew significantly. His followers back in Mecca began to face serious persecution in the loss of property and threat of bodily harm. In large part this resistance was a response to the Prophet’s continuing attacks on the Meccan caravan trade—the primary means by which Muhammad financed his mission and community. Muhammad subsequently decreed that fighting was permissible only to ward off aggression and reclaim goods and property confiscated by infidels. [See Sura 22:39] Also, see Sura 2:190-194. 3. From Defensive to Offensive As the doctrine of jihad developed, Muhammad taught that those who sacrificed their lives in battle for the cause of God would be guaranteed (148) admission to the highest level of heaven. Moreover, Muhammad decreed that all booty collected in conquest should be distributed among the mujahidin (those engaged in jihad). Nine verses in the Koran speak specifically of booty and how it is properly distributed. Another thirty verses deal with the treatment of slaves (those taken prisoner) now owned by Muslims as a result of the division of booty from successful battles. Not surprisingly, the number of Muslim men willing to commit their lives to holy war surged from this point on.^1 [Interestingly, one-fifth of all booty taken in jihad was to be given to Allah, or more precisely to Muhammad as his representative. According to the Koran (8:41), this treasure was to be used for the support of Muhammad’s extended family, for orphans, the poor, and the sojourner.] This third stage of development moved jihad from defensive in nature to offensive. Muslims were now to take the initiative in war, but they were to refrain from attacks during the four sacred months (recognized by all tribes within the Arabian peninsula as months for pilgrimage to various religious shrines at Mecca and elsewhere). [See Sura 9:5] 4. Expansionist Jihad …removed any limitations on when fighting in the cause of Allah could be initiated. When commanded by a recognized Muslim leader, military attack against non-Muslims was deemed appropriate in any season and on any land not yet surrendered to the armies of Islam. [See Sura 9:29] Which of these stages is meant to be normative for Islam? According to standard Islamic jurisprudence, it is the fourth (i.e., expansionist jihad) Epilogue Falling in Love Again We, as the bride of Christ, must fall in love again with our Bridegroom. Only then, I believe, will we begin to see fulfilled the words of the prophet Isaiah: [See Isaiah 19:23-25:] In that day there will be a highway from Egypt to Assyria. The Assyrians will go to Egypt and the Egyptians to Assyria. The Egyptians and Assyrians will worship together. In that day Israel will be the third, along with Egypt and Assyria, a blessing on the earth. The LORD Almighty will bless them, saying, “Blessed be Egypt my people, Assyria my handiwork, and Israel my inheritance.” May the Lord Jesus bring this to pass in our day. 164

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scquest

    Helpful reference book. Study questions at the end. Clearly points to Jesus and his love as being the crux of the apologetic strategy in working with muslims. I disagree with his belief that Muslims worship the God of the Bible, but they are just misled, in the same way that Jews are misled.

  8. 5 out of 5

    En Yi WEI

    A most delightful book to read One that gives an excellent overview of Islam

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matt DeVore

    The author draws attention to many passages of the Koran that parallel the Bible. However, the stories and teachings as portrayed in the Koran seem to be based on a weak understanding of the Bible such as apocryphal writings and oral traditions. There also seems to be an emphasis on violence (jihad at some levels) and sensuality (pleasures of heaven). The book helps define some bridges for Christians to start conversations with Muslims.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Useful guide for Christians.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Informative, fair and well-written Short summary: Mateen Elass is uniquely qualified to write such a book. His father was a Muslim. He was raised in Saudi Arabia. He is now a Presbyterian minister in the United States. His short, 10 chapter book introduces the reader to the Koran by telling its history and the common touchpoints that it shares with the Bible, Christian tradition and Jewish tradition. Elass also introduces the reader to the proper handling of the Koran and has a balanced discussion Informative, fair and well-written Short summary: Mateen Elass is uniquely qualified to write such a book. His father was a Muslim. He was raised in Saudi Arabia. He is now a Presbyterian minister in the United States. His short, 10 chapter book introduces the reader to the Koran by telling its history and the common touchpoints that it shares with the Bible, Christian tradition and Jewish tradition. Elass also introduces the reader to the proper handling of the Koran and has a balanced discussion on the role of Jihad in Islam, as defined in the Koran. An optional Bible study is located at the back of the book with lots of questions designed for group discussion. My review: An absolutely excellent book! The reader is not required to be a Christian to understand the book - but a working knowledge of Christian tradition and the Bible would help. Mateen Elass has produced a wonderful introduction to Islam and the Koran. He is respectful of Islam throughout the book, but it is clear that he is writing from the Christian perspective. I have but one complaint: he has excellent commentary in his endnotes that complement the text. Unfortunately, I discovered this about halfway through the book. I wish it had been footnotes instead. I'll be on the lookout for another book by Elass. Might I suggest a book on Islam itself? Or, perhaps Muslim customs and holidays? See all of my reviews at: http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Like a pocket review of the koran. What I liked best was the parallels the author draws between bible and the koran and shows the distinction. He also goes to pains to show how the bible and koran or almost the same book. End of the day it leads to more questions, but the depth and breadth of understanding in a single book is more then worth the time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This book is a nice short introduction to the Koran and what it says, and how it was written. It was written by a man who converted from Islam to Christianity, and he explained why and how the Koran plays an important part of a Muslim's life. This book is a nice short introduction to the Koran and what it says, and how it was written. It was written by a man who converted from Islam to Christianity, and he explained why and how the Koran plays an important part of a Muslim's life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meadow Frisbie

    I LOVED it. I was so in depth about the Koran, I learned a lot. It was interesting to see what they belived, and how the Koran compares to our Bible. A must read for any Bible schooler....to an ordinary teen!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Peterson

    Recommended by Mark Bush

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    This book is heavily referenced in the textbook that I teach from. That was nice to see. My dad gave the book to me several years ago, and I had never gotten to it. Very in-depth and helpful.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alice Verberne

    Very Christian-centric. The book is opinionated and not balanced.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A very good concise guide to the Koran.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lea Chernock

  21. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  22. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Everett

  23. 4 out of 5

    Drew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stirling Joyner

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark Mathewson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bradly J

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abe

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.