counter create hit The Life of Helen Betty Osborne: A Graphic Novel - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Life of Helen Betty Osborne: A Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

Helen Betty Osborne dreamed of becoming a teacher. Sadly, her dream never came true. Helen left her home in Norway House, Manitoba, to attend Guy Hill Residential School in 1969. In September 1971, she entered Margaret Barbour Collegiate in The Pas, Manitoba. Two months later, on November 13, 1971, she was brutally murdered by four young, white men. Years later, the Aborig Helen Betty Osborne dreamed of becoming a teacher. Sadly, her dream never came true. Helen left her home in Norway House, Manitoba, to attend Guy Hill Residential School in 1969. In September 1971, she entered Margaret Barbour Collegiate in The Pas, Manitoba. Two months later, on November 13, 1971, she was brutally murdered by four young, white men. Years later, the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry concluded that her murder was the result of racism, sexism, and indifference. The Life of Helen Betty Osborne is a graphic novel about Betty’s life up to that tragic November day. Her story is told by a young boy named Daniel. The events in Betty’s story are true. The events in Daniel’s story represent our ability to change, learn, and grow


Compare

Helen Betty Osborne dreamed of becoming a teacher. Sadly, her dream never came true. Helen left her home in Norway House, Manitoba, to attend Guy Hill Residential School in 1969. In September 1971, she entered Margaret Barbour Collegiate in The Pas, Manitoba. Two months later, on November 13, 1971, she was brutally murdered by four young, white men. Years later, the Aborig Helen Betty Osborne dreamed of becoming a teacher. Sadly, her dream never came true. Helen left her home in Norway House, Manitoba, to attend Guy Hill Residential School in 1969. In September 1971, she entered Margaret Barbour Collegiate in The Pas, Manitoba. Two months later, on November 13, 1971, she was brutally murdered by four young, white men. Years later, the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry concluded that her murder was the result of racism, sexism, and indifference. The Life of Helen Betty Osborne is a graphic novel about Betty’s life up to that tragic November day. Her story is told by a young boy named Daniel. The events in Betty’s story are true. The events in Daniel’s story represent our ability to change, learn, and grow

30 review for The Life of Helen Betty Osborne: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    The book is more than it seems. Despite the fact that it portrays the violence of Osborne's murder and the horror of racist crimes, a nostalgic, wistful and hopeful sentimentality permeates the text and the graphics. I think it's very well done because the story does not seek to provoke anger or indignance, but to promote peace, hope and healing. The font bugged me a little bit because of the sporadic spacing. But other that, it is poetic, touching and a wonderful read. The book is more than it seems. Despite the fact that it portrays the violence of Osborne's murder and the horror of racist crimes, a nostalgic, wistful and hopeful sentimentality permeates the text and the graphics. I think it's very well done because the story does not seek to provoke anger or indignance, but to promote peace, hope and healing. The font bugged me a little bit because of the sporadic spacing. But other that, it is poetic, touching and a wonderful read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heather Pearson

    Thirty-nine years ago today, nineteen year old Helen Betty Osborne was brutally murdered in The Pas, Manitoba by four men. She had planned to be a teacher so that other youth wouldn't have to leave their families and homes to get an education. Author David Alexander Robertson and Artist Madison Blackstone have employed the format of a graphic novel to make this tragic story more accessible to teachers and their students. A teaching guide is available from Portage and Main Press. There is no good Thirty-nine years ago today, nineteen year old Helen Betty Osborne was brutally murdered in The Pas, Manitoba by four men. She had planned to be a teacher so that other youth wouldn't have to leave their families and homes to get an education. Author David Alexander Robertson and Artist Madison Blackstone have employed the format of a graphic novel to make this tragic story more accessible to teachers and their students. A teaching guide is available from Portage and Main Press. There is no good reason why Helen shouldn't be alive today. In 1988 the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry was convened to examine what happened and why. Their conclusion: It is clear that Betty Osborne would not have been killed if she had not been Aboriginal. The four men who took her to her death from the streets of The Pas that night had gone looking for an Aboriginal girl with whom to "party." They found Betty Osborne. When she refused to party she was driven out of town and murdered. Those who abducted her showed a total lack of regard for her person or her rights as an individual. Those who stood by while the physical assault took place, while sexual advances were made and while she was being beaten to death showed their own racism, sexism and indifference. Those who knew the story and remained silent must share their guilt. While this is a short graphic novel, it's impact on me was huge. As a woman and as a mother I find it very chilling that another person could chose the final course of my life for me. This book is not just for our kids, it contains messages for all readers. The roots of racism, sexism and indifference are not found within our children; they are passed down from earlier generations. I'm glad I searched out and ordered this book. I know that it's message is still needed each time I hear others laugh at racist and sexist jokes. The Helen Betty Osborne Memorial Foundation provides assistance to to Aboriginal persons enrolled in post-secondary education.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pooker

    I read this book the day I bought it in September, 2011 and had intended originally to release it via BookCrossing on the 40th Anniversary of Helen Betty Osborne's murder, November 13th, 2011 but I wasn't quite ready to release it that day. I think that one of the purposes of the author and illustrator in creating this graphic novel is that so we will read it and remember. I do, when reminded and from time to time on my own, remember the investigation of Helen Betty Osborne's death and the Aborigi I read this book the day I bought it in September, 2011 and had intended originally to release it via BookCrossing on the 40th Anniversary of Helen Betty Osborne's murder, November 13th, 2011 but I wasn't quite ready to release it that day. I think that one of the purposes of the author and illustrator in creating this graphic novel is that so we will read it and remember. I do, when reminded and from time to time on my own, remember the investigation of Helen Betty Osborne's death and the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry's conclusion, but those memories are usually fleeting, a thought in passing. I'm a neophyte when it comes to reading graphic novels. I've found that you just can't whip a long the words from left to right. You need to read the words and the pictures and think about each panel one at a time. Each picture is like a thousand words as they say and similarly, in a graphic novel, the few words written suggest a thousand more words for our thoughts. Just having the book on my desk with the picture of Helen Betty Osborne smiling up at me served to make me stop and remember and think. I wondered what kind of teacher Betty would have been. I wonder about the things she might have taught instead of what she did teach us. I wonder, if in the 40 years since Betty's murder, we have really learned enough or anything. I've decided to release this book today, on International Woman's Day in the hopes that whoever finds it will also find within it reason to stop and remember and think.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Difficult to rate... it is such a tragic and important story to read. But I wish this novel was longer.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    This is a graphic novelization of the murder of Helen Betty Osborne, the very rare, if not only, graphic- and true-crime combination. Helen Osborne was a Native American living on a Canadian reservation. She wants to become a teacher so she has to live out of town to attend school. While she's there attending school, she is picked up by a couple of non-Native men and raped and murdered. The author makes it very clear that she was only murdered because she was a Native American. I wanted this book This is a graphic novelization of the murder of Helen Betty Osborne, the very rare, if not only, graphic- and true-crime combination. Helen Osborne was a Native American living on a Canadian reservation. She wants to become a teacher so she has to live out of town to attend school. While she's there attending school, she is picked up by a couple of non-Native men and raped and murdered. The author makes it very clear that she was only murdered because she was a Native American. I wanted this book to be more than it was. For starters, it's only about 30 pages. The author could have gotten more into life on the reservation or talked more about Helen, but instead spends almost every page hammering home that she was murdered! Because she was Native American! Because she was off the (safety) of the reservation! She was murdered! There's like one page which describes the murder, which if the whole book is about the murder, shouldn't there be more than one page about the actual murder? A vague description that her body was mangled and it took a lot of people to identify her. No description of the crime scene or how they managed to find the guys who killed her. Instead, more hammering home of she was murdered! Because she was Native American! Off of the reservation! Going to college! Like, I get it already. Also, the story is not told in a linear fashion, but rather a disjointed version that is really kind of messy. The story starts off with an unknown woman (whom we later find out is probably Helen) in the snow, dying, and then jumps way ahead to a classroom where a teacher is teaching a high school class about the importance of Helen, then jumps back to police notifying family that she was dead, then way back to Helen living on the reservation and deciding to go to college. It's just chaotic.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Starleigh

    The story of Helen Betty Osborne is not an easy one to tell. A young Aboriginal woman goes to the city to educate herself and is killed in a brutal sexual assault. Her killers chose her as a victim because she was Aboriginal, and they had stereotypes about Aboriginal women that caused them to think that it was alright to victimize her. The RCMP and community were slow to respond appropriately to her death because she was Aboriginal.The portrayal of racial and gendered violence in Canada is a dif The story of Helen Betty Osborne is not an easy one to tell. A young Aboriginal woman goes to the city to educate herself and is killed in a brutal sexual assault. Her killers chose her as a victim because she was Aboriginal, and they had stereotypes about Aboriginal women that caused them to think that it was alright to victimize her. The RCMP and community were slow to respond appropriately to her death because she was Aboriginal.The portrayal of racial and gendered violence in Canada is a difficult subject to broach in the classroom. This book, however, does a good job of explaining the event with compassion for Helen while exploring the structural causes of her murder. Portage and Main Press recommends this book for grades 9-12 and it also comes with a free teacher resource guide.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristal

    This is an important story to tell. I think I've now read all of David Alexander Robertson's graphic novels and I really enjoy them: they tell history in an interesting and captivating way. One criticism I have of this book is I found it a little hard to follow at first with it switching characters and time frames (i.e. I thought the female student at the beginning of the book was Betty). This is an important story to tell. I think I've now read all of David Alexander Robertson's graphic novels and I really enjoy them: they tell history in an interesting and captivating way. One criticism I have of this book is I found it a little hard to follow at first with it switching characters and time frames (i.e. I thought the female student at the beginning of the book was Betty).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sari

  9. 4 out of 5

    Noelle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim Miller

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lindy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Auguagss

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tess

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barrette Plett

  17. 5 out of 5

    Clifton Courchene

  18. 4 out of 5

    Franz Bien

  19. 5 out of 5

    Annie Beach

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anya Kelman

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jean

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  28. 5 out of 5

    InformationSuperhero

  29. 5 out of 5

    Samantha J

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.