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Five lectures George Soros recently delivered at the Central European University in Budapest - which he founded in 1991 - distill a lifetime of thinking on finance, capitalism and open society In a series of lectures delivered at the Central European University in October 2009, George Soros provided a broad overview of his thoughts on economics and politics. The lectures a Five lectures George Soros recently delivered at the Central European University in Budapest - which he founded in 1991 - distill a lifetime of thinking on finance, capitalism and open society In a series of lectures delivered at the Central European University in October 2009, George Soros provided a broad overview of his thoughts on economics and politics. The lectures are the culmination of a lifetime of practical and philosophical reflection. In the first and second lecture, Soros discusses his general theory of reflexivity and its application to financial markets, providing insight into the recent financial crisis. The third and fourth lectures examine the concept of open society, which has guided Soros' global philanthropy, as well as the potential for conflict between capitalism and open society. The closing lecture focuses on the way ahead, closely examining the increasingly important economic and political role that China will play in the future. "The Budapest Lectures" presents these five seminal talks into one volume, which offers a condensed and highly readable summary of Soros' world view.


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Five lectures George Soros recently delivered at the Central European University in Budapest - which he founded in 1991 - distill a lifetime of thinking on finance, capitalism and open society In a series of lectures delivered at the Central European University in October 2009, George Soros provided a broad overview of his thoughts on economics and politics. The lectures a Five lectures George Soros recently delivered at the Central European University in Budapest - which he founded in 1991 - distill a lifetime of thinking on finance, capitalism and open society In a series of lectures delivered at the Central European University in October 2009, George Soros provided a broad overview of his thoughts on economics and politics. The lectures are the culmination of a lifetime of practical and philosophical reflection. In the first and second lecture, Soros discusses his general theory of reflexivity and its application to financial markets, providing insight into the recent financial crisis. The third and fourth lectures examine the concept of open society, which has guided Soros' global philanthropy, as well as the potential for conflict between capitalism and open society. The closing lecture focuses on the way ahead, closely examining the increasingly important economic and political role that China will play in the future. "The Budapest Lectures" presents these five seminal talks into one volume, which offers a condensed and highly readable summary of Soros' world view.

30 review for The Soros Lectures: At the Central European University

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Let me explain my understanding of The reflexivity concept by the fable that I learned when I was young. This is not Soro's story: There's a family have a leopard as a pet in a village in Africa. The leopard is nice and plays with kids. The family has an enemy in another village, so the father decided to send the leopard to kill his enemy. The leopard carried the mission and when it back home, he killed the family too. Soros suggested that people has "fallibility" because we never able to observe Let me explain my understanding of The reflexivity concept by the fable that I learned when I was young. This is not Soro's story: There's a family have a leopard as a pet in a village in Africa. The leopard is nice and plays with kids. The family has an enemy in another village, so the father decided to send the leopard to kill his enemy. The leopard carried the mission and when it back home, he killed the family too. Soros suggested that people has "fallibility" because we never able to observe the total picture and our understanding are always biased. The fallibility works hand in hand with the Reflexivity to causes social problems including financial crisis and bubbles. That is his main part. Besides the congitive function, Soros said that our mind also has the manipulative function. Knowledge comes toward our mind, while manupulation is from our mind toward the external world. Outcome of behaviour that is subject to these two functions becomes unpredictable. Whoo, I considered Communication as the way to manupulate, Soros put it in a deeper level. Reflexivity contrasts to the Efficient Hypothesis in the finance theory. Soros recommended that supervision to the market by regulatory is a must. And it is the way to reduce shocks from crisis. Liquidity must be control too. He further explained the problem of agency theory in political regime, and the visible hands behind the "invisible hand" of the market. He has a strong idea on the position of ethics in our soceity. He suggested that the market and society/politics should not be treated in the same way. A real open socity should be based on public interest where market transaction and assumptions does not work. Soros discribed a set of idea that is challenging to the fundamental of the finanical world assumptions and our soceity. An intersting book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edward Xiao

    The book serves as a transcript to Soros' talks in 2009. In it, Soros lays out his frameworks for thinking about the the world and his theory of reflexivity. The idea is important but I'm not certain if it required the length of the book and could have likely been better structured to provide clarity. However, the book provides a view into Soros' thinking and his thought process which was a worthwhile tradeoff. Some predictions are laid out in the book that have been proven to be untrue, however, The book serves as a transcript to Soros' talks in 2009. In it, Soros lays out his frameworks for thinking about the the world and his theory of reflexivity. The idea is important but I'm not certain if it required the length of the book and could have likely been better structured to provide clarity. However, the book provides a view into Soros' thinking and his thought process which was a worthwhile tradeoff. Some predictions are laid out in the book that have been proven to be untrue, however, in current times, it may serve that they were delayed and will be insightful to see if any will occur as cycles and pressures are tested in 2020 COVID crisis.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    As this book contains five lectures, which deal with different topics and are very different from each other, it is hard to give this book, so all the lectures, one rating. One main topic is the background of the 2008 financial crisis, the other is the open society. Both are centered around some economic theories he has which are rooted in philosophy. He kind of brings the two topics together in the last chapter, but still, the lectures have a very different focus. The chapter on the open societ As this book contains five lectures, which deal with different topics and are very different from each other, it is hard to give this book, so all the lectures, one rating. One main topic is the background of the 2008 financial crisis, the other is the open society. Both are centered around some economic theories he has which are rooted in philosophy. He kind of brings the two topics together in the last chapter, but still, the lectures have a very different focus. The chapter on the open society I found fascinating. Using the two concepts of failability and reflexivity, this lecture, from 2009, gives a very interesting theory about the what we would now call the post-truth era. He describes that, already during the Bush administration, respecting the truth has become a handicap rather than a virtue - and how more actual this thought has become since Trump came to power. This chapter is a very interesting read, which I'd give a higher rating. Not having an economic background, I found some other parts of his lectures hard to follow; some of the economic terms he used I'm not quite knowledgeable enough about. He compares his theories to what, according to him, the general theory is, but I'm not in a position to judge how new, true or sensible it is what he says. Soros of course is known for his wealth, and his philanthropic endeavors. Still, after reading these lectures, I cannot help but wonder if it wouldn't be wise to take some more responsibility at the front, while making money, in stead of only when spending it. He calls market fundamentalism 'amoral' - which he clearly distinguished from immoral: a dollar is a dollar, no matter how you got it. I do think, however, that not caring how a dollar was made (he says moral reasons play no part in the decisions he took), is a form of immorality, because you knowingly, willingly, withdraw from any responsibility you have. This lack of 'taking your own responsibility' is repeated in his other ideas as well. He tries to distinguish between the economic (do what is good for you) and public domain (do what is good for the public), and would have the role of authorities, supervising/monitoring, be limited to the public domain. However, he couldn't convince me at all that those can be separated in the way he states, or that they do not heavily influence each other. And also, he admits he's doing some things that serve his own interest, but rather sees it publicly supervised so it would serve the public's interest, and so it reads to me as: I'm doing it as long as no-one forbids me. These kind of thoughts seem too simple for me, and lower my rating of the book. It's hard to rate a nonfiction book, because do you rate how well the ideas were worked out, how well they can convince you, or how well you agree with them? The book gave me plenty to think about, regardless of how much I agree or disagree, so I do recommend it. It might be even more appealing to those with an economic background. A last note: the Dutch title, which makes the book sound more like a self-help book, doesn't at ALL reflect its contents. As the rest of the translation was good, I cannot help but think this was a publisher's decision - and a bad one, that is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brian Godsey

    Six stars, if that were possible. In 120 pages, this book managed to state most of my own theories about finance and political economy not held by the general public---markets are nowhere near efficient, financial bubbles are followed by irrational over-corrections, most people vote immorally to improve their own interests instead of for fairness or common good, the "invisible hand" exists but is not alone---and then takes all of the ideas several steps further, explaining how they work, what can Six stars, if that were possible. In 120 pages, this book managed to state most of my own theories about finance and political economy not held by the general public---markets are nowhere near efficient, financial bubbles are followed by irrational over-corrections, most people vote immorally to improve their own interests instead of for fairness or common good, the "invisible hand" exists but is not alone---and then takes all of the ideas several steps further, explaining how they work, what can be done, and what Soros himself has done to help it along. I knew nearly nothing about Soros before I read this book, but I was curious based on some news articles, so I got this book. What I now know is that Soros is one of two ubiquitously famous financiers/investors---Warren Buffett being the other---who is entirely worthy of any and all respect people give him. The five lectures contained in this book prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Soros' analysis of past events is correct, and he makes an incredible argument for his future predictions and prescriptions. To top it off, Soros announces (in October 2009) the creation of a new institute intended to rigorously study the status quo of economic knowledge---which Soros says is flawed, or at least severely incomplete---from all angles, including Soros' theories, but not exclusively. To show that Soros means what he says, he started the institute and then abdicated all power over it. This is akin to Warren Buffett begging for the U.S. to raise the estate tax---which he has done. Both of these truly great men have repeatedly given up power, wealth, and opportunity for the common good, actions that are unfortunately rare. Soros is my new idol; he may not be as successful with his investments as Buffett, but he's more aggressive in his fight for a better society.

  5. 4 out of 5

    A Mig

    A good summary of Soros' philosophy, making me want to read more of his books. Pompous at times (e.g. "Emboldened by my recent successes, I will go so far as to claim that my conceptual framework provides the correct interpretation of reality. That is a bold claim..."), it is quite possible that the whole philosophy is only backed by Soros' successes. As such, it should be seen as a biography and not as a silver bullet to solve socio-economical problems (and to become rich by the way). A good summary of Soros' philosophy, making me want to read more of his books. Pompous at times (e.g. "Emboldened by my recent successes, I will go so far as to claim that my conceptual framework provides the correct interpretation of reality. That is a bold claim..."), it is quite possible that the whole philosophy is only backed by Soros' successes. As such, it should be seen as a biography and not as a silver bullet to solve socio-economical problems (and to become rich by the way).

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    George, a man who became self obscene rich, claim and gives speech all over the globe. And this book is about the speech he gave at Central EU University..Quick summary: i) He believes human are flawed, decisions are unwise, especially financial decisions and stock market decisions are flawed..He used a Flexivity term to describe as solution to make a better world due to human flaw, but environment has to be ii) Capitalism based...yet iii) Open Society is the basis to create Capitalism-enriched. George, a man who became self obscene rich, claim and gives speech all over the globe. And this book is about the speech he gave at Central EU University..Quick summary: i) He believes human are flawed, decisions are unwise, especially financial decisions and stock market decisions are flawed..He used a Flexivity term to describe as solution to make a better world due to human flaw, but environment has to be ii) Capitalism based...yet iii) Open Society is the basis to create Capitalism-enriched. First chapter he would think he is the philosopher and make you think his logic is legitimate such as what he called Behavior Finance...yet he bashed Bush for his barbaric act against Iraq and Middle East, yet he embraced Obama for his soft policy and peaceful foreign policy..As another summary: Soros is a thug who lives under the roof of two back to back evil regime: Bush and Obama on foreign policy and two rigged the country of USA financially by collaborating with the corporations and deep states...like a child who complain about father, but not the mother..yet his evil deeds continue under these two regime by funding massive freedom group, and to fuel foreign revolutions, so he can act as an economic killer to loot other countries' resources, and understanding how to belly flip foreign stock markets. His claim of Open Society based on his past horrible experience under Soviets and Germans make you feel sympathetic towards his "noble Cause"...but this is just facade that he does not want you to know he funded Ukraine revolution, anti-Trump women rally...this is his act is to directly fund revolutionary to create immediate effect of success...this goes against Prof Chua that US based fake democracy (not a pure democratic country based on the election process and also congressional decisions on many subjects)...cannot simply be exported to cast on Asian countries..since the cultural and political practice may not work...Check Open Society and you will find a lot secret ops that undergone to fuel foreign blood shed...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Setiadi

    This is a special one for me, not for the content but for the story on how I got the book: the physical book that I have is from none other than George Soros himself, albeit indirectly. So in 2010 George Soros visited Indonesia, and he brought along several of this book to give away to few people that he met, as a good gesture. And one of those people who received the book was someone who doesn't know who Soros was, doesn't have a slight interest on him, but knew that I would probably appreciate This is a special one for me, not for the content but for the story on how I got the book: the physical book that I have is from none other than George Soros himself, albeit indirectly. So in 2010 George Soros visited Indonesia, and he brought along several of this book to give away to few people that he met, as a good gesture. And one of those people who received the book was someone who doesn't know who Soros was, doesn't have a slight interest on him, but knew that I would probably appreciate the book. Well, as a person who has a mild case (mild?) of tsundoku I finally read the book, 10 years later. And it's.... typical of Soros. I've read more books written by Soros that I would like to admit (three, three books), and every time I read his book I always have this hope that the next sentence would be the bomb that I've been waiting for, akin to his stature as a financial market legend. But "da bomb" never happened, and this book - or more precisely this lectures - seems to be no exception. Soros is one of a kind hedge fund manager, with a brilliant trader's instinct, but he's not a good writer and a vague philosopher at best. But that is precisely what makes him human, and it can even be the antidote to the boogeyman, market-crashing, democracy-interrupting [misleading] enigma that is forever attached to his name. Hey, even Gordon Gekko has a soft side as shown towards the end of Wall Street 2 movie. But then, just when I nearly wrapped up this book, there it was. Da bomb. Lecture 5 is so good it’s worth one additional star just for this chapter alone. It showed that in 2010 Soros could summarise in a clear manner the problems in international finance and politics since the days of the Bretton Woods up until the 2008 crisis and its aftermath. And the predictions that he made a decade ago in lecture 5? He nailed almost every single one of them. That’s the Soros that I’ve been waiting for, and I’m sure glad I stick with the book till the end.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven Siswandhi

    Good introduction to Soros. Brief and sensible. When you read through it you'll get the feeling of reading a master's thinking: there's that clarity that can pierce through any enigma. Be it international finance and politics, investment strategy, and so on, he made it look easy. Many people wanna read his stuff to get investment advice but unfortunately he doesn't give much. Instead what he gave are quasi-philosophical concepts that he claimed to be derived from his famous mentor Karl Popper. To Good introduction to Soros. Brief and sensible. When you read through it you'll get the feeling of reading a master's thinking: there's that clarity that can pierce through any enigma. Be it international finance and politics, investment strategy, and so on, he made it look easy. Many people wanna read his stuff to get investment advice but unfortunately he doesn't give much. Instead what he gave are quasi-philosophical concepts that he claimed to be derived from his famous mentor Karl Popper. To me his 'philosophy' just sounds like common sense. Nevertheless, probably that's what served him well all this time; a certain disrespect for the prevailing theories of the day (such as the efficient market hypothesis) and a belief in his own ideas. The rest is just gut instinct and brave risk taking. Perhaps that's his entire investment philosophy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Cheong

    This book expanded my view beyond the efficient market hypothesis and the neo-classical production function. The theory of reflexivity is one possible exploration of alternatives to economics - since my interaction with people from the Institute of New Economic Thinking which Soros and a few others founded, I am realising that a new era of economics in development which I believe would enable better pricing for private equity and venture capital funded assets.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Josiah R

    His talk on reflexivity was interesting and what I was most anxious to hear more about. But the lecture on Popper's open society was confusing. In fact I find the man confusing ... on the one hand, he was heavily influenced to believe in strong protection for individual rights due to his experiences with the Nazi and Soviet dictatorships, but appears to promote heavy-handed regulation as the solution to certain social problems, which seems like a remarkable contradiction. His talk on reflexivity was interesting and what I was most anxious to hear more about. But the lecture on Popper's open society was confusing. In fact I find the man confusing ... on the one hand, he was heavily influenced to believe in strong protection for individual rights due to his experiences with the Nazi and Soviet dictatorships, but appears to promote heavy-handed regulation as the solution to certain social problems, which seems like a remarkable contradiction.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Orban

    An eye opener book definitely. Ideas, like the reflexivity were deep inside me in an unconscious way. Soros explained it well. I would recommend this book to those who would like to understand better the underlying forces shaping our markets. This book has opened doors for me. It also helped me to clear the false accusations targeting Soros himself, which are obviously not true.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jane Sorensen

    Lucid, easy to read, and should be read by a majority of people to understand financial and political market interplay and current events in the context of the 2010 aftermath of the financial crisis. The first chapter is the densest and one should study/take notes to help make subsequent reading even more clear, but one will get meaning out of it in a casual read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul McKinlay

    Heavy read that requires focus... but is short and broken up so manageable. Will re read some of the lectures again for sure. Interesting to read his predictions and suggestions from 10yrs ago and how they’ve played out

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lew Mills

    Cogent and concise analysis of global economics Soros has a useful framework for understanding many economic and political problems. Some of his predictions still have value in 2020.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    Rec by David Perell: "One of the most successful investors of the 20th century laid out his Karl Popper inspired investment philosophy in a series of lectures about the Open Society, reflexivity, capitalism, and the financial crisis." Rec by David Perell: "One of the most successful investors of the 20th century laid out his Karl Popper inspired investment philosophy in a series of lectures about the Open Society, reflexivity, capitalism, and the financial crisis."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    You can find the audio for free online. The one on reflexivity is genuinely good. The rest so and so.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Polanco

    Abstractions just compelling enough to warrant consideration of exploring, if not shifting, my societal paradigm

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    In a nutshell, Soros grants a succinct treatment on his personal perception towards the dynamics and operating basis of the financial markets and it's individual participants - in what is known as his theory of reflexivity. He goes on to highlight his personal views (which in and of itself holds a certain volume of truth) on how the current operating philosophy, the preponderant consensus on modern market belief brought on by prolific lobbying and widespread propaganda, is inherently flawed and w In a nutshell, Soros grants a succinct treatment on his personal perception towards the dynamics and operating basis of the financial markets and it's individual participants - in what is known as his theory of reflexivity. He goes on to highlight his personal views (which in and of itself holds a certain volume of truth) on how the current operating philosophy, the preponderant consensus on modern market belief brought on by prolific lobbying and widespread propaganda, is inherently flawed and why his self conceived model is inextricably the better fit, given the global economy's current state of affairs. The icing on the cake comes in the later quarter of the book, wherein Soros injects his personal judgement in unravelling the future of the world's economy. All in all, the book provides a robust treatment on his views in a very digestible package. Whether the master's record for prescience will manifest in reality once more remains foggy. But, it is clear that if finance fused together with a blend of philosophy and dialectics is palatable to your appetite, I can safely assure you that nothing but satisfaction awaits you in this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    Soros covers a variety of disciplines, from philosophy to economics to politics. Soros is no doubt a smart guy who's really thought through financial markets, as well as his own theories. There was one point in the book where he went all "Spiderman" and mentioned how with great power and money comes great responsibility or something like that. While I agree that he's done some great things for great causes with his wealth and power, he was all about insider trading and short selling to GET his w Soros covers a variety of disciplines, from philosophy to economics to politics. Soros is no doubt a smart guy who's really thought through financial markets, as well as his own theories. There was one point in the book where he went all "Spiderman" and mentioned how with great power and money comes great responsibility or something like that. While I agree that he's done some great things for great causes with his wealth and power, he was all about insider trading and short selling to GET his wealth and power. Despite this, his philanthropy is impressive overall. Nevertheless, he has some good insights. Unfortunately, I'm not properly versed in financial market vocabulary to fully understand everything he's talking about, but this is well worth a read for those interested in free markets, bubbles, and ideas like "market fundamentalism."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kanti Brahma

    The Soros Lectures blend the financial crises with philosophy. The concepts are simple and appeals your intellect. However, the reader requires to connect the dots with precision...otherwise there is fear of getting lost in the abstract parts of the lectures. A good read- provides logical insight into financial markets and open society. Clarifies how markets, open societies and politics get manipulated. The lectures concludes with some suggestions which needs further sharpening. If you want to w The Soros Lectures blend the financial crises with philosophy. The concepts are simple and appeals your intellect. However, the reader requires to connect the dots with precision...otherwise there is fear of getting lost in the abstract parts of the lectures. A good read- provides logical insight into financial markets and open society. Clarifies how markets, open societies and politics get manipulated. The lectures concludes with some suggestions which needs further sharpening. If you want to wear a regulator's hat---read this book will definitely be of value for you.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Murciaspain

    George soros has a Non unique view of economy. He simply wants to get richer. No secret about it .warren buffet wants to get richer too but he stresses in a fair playing field Soros thinks that we need to take advantage of Any playing field If we see a hole we take advantage. Warren tries to close the holes. I read both and both have served me well. I'm a little fish in a little pond but a fat fish George soros has a Non unique view of economy. He simply wants to get richer. No secret about it .warren buffet wants to get richer too but he stresses in a fair playing field Soros thinks that we need to take advantage of Any playing field If we see a hole we take advantage. Warren tries to close the holes. I read both and both have served me well. I'm a little fish in a little pond but a fat fish

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ajay

    I was surprised by this book. I agree with a LOT of how Soros thinks about markets, and I agree with a lot of his diagnoses about problems with markets and government. I can't bring myself to share his optimism about the solution though, it seems overly simplistic a lot of the time. Still though, given that I opened it expecting to be unable to finish it, I liked this book quite a bit. I was surprised by this book. I agree with a LOT of how Soros thinks about markets, and I agree with a lot of his diagnoses about problems with markets and government. I can't bring myself to share his optimism about the solution though, it seems overly simplistic a lot of the time. Still though, given that I opened it expecting to be unable to finish it, I liked this book quite a bit.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Damian

    I lived this lecture series. Soros is ipen and insightfull. He exposes his train of though on his view of modern economy and society, and his take on the effects of the economic crisis. I am not sure how much I share on some of his ideas, but he is certainly challenging many of the accepted (and flawed ) paradigms commonly accepted.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Interesting look into the mind of Soros. His economic theory is interesting but his social commentary is the real reason to read this book. Reading between the lines I see a man who would like to break down world governments by any means possible so he can build them up into his vision of utopia. He's a sick puppy. Interesting look into the mind of Soros. His economic theory is interesting but his social commentary is the real reason to read this book. Reading between the lines I see a man who would like to break down world governments by any means possible so he can build them up into his vision of utopia. He's a sick puppy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ásgeir

    Very interesting to read more in-depth about Soros's theory on Reflexivity and how it contrasts with the prevailing Rational Expectation Theory. His views on how and why the current financial regulatory framework is flawed is also food for thought. Recommended read for those interested in the financial markets and of course those interested in the musings of one of our financial titans. Very interesting to read more in-depth about Soros's theory on Reflexivity and how it contrasts with the prevailing Rational Expectation Theory. His views on how and why the current financial regulatory framework is flawed is also food for thought. Recommended read for those interested in the financial markets and of course those interested in the musings of one of our financial titans.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sengbeng Goh

    In this book, Soros speaks at length about his theory of Reflexivity in general abstract terms. To be honest, there is nothing about the philosophy that is non-trivial. To give Soros the benefit of the doubt, perhaps I am just from a different generation and thus fail to appreciate the historical sensitivity of his ideas.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer W.

    Although I disagree with George Soros on a number of things, he summarized his philosophy well in this book. If you want a quick overview of Soros's beliefs in his own words, this is a wonderful book. Although I disagree with George Soros on a number of things, he summarized his philosophy well in this book. If you want a quick overview of Soros's beliefs in his own words, this is a wonderful book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    It was okay. The first chapter dealt with some mistakes people make when investing - mainly following the crowd. The rest was more about Soros' philosophical view of having Open Society (Sounds like a mix of democracy and socialism) It was okay. The first chapter dealt with some mistakes people make when investing - mainly following the crowd. The rest was more about Soros' philosophical view of having Open Society (Sounds like a mix of democracy and socialism)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emil Emilov

    Interesting ideas although I do not agree fully with everything he says. The ideas of reflexive reactions and the erroneous character of human behavior suits my life philosophy and I find them useful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Superb. Some of the finest economic thinking since F A Hayek's The Chains of Serfdom Superb. Some of the finest economic thinking since F A Hayek's The Chains of Serfdom

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