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The Great Airport Mystery

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Frank and Joe graduate from highschool together and have a summer to enjoy. Timely eavesdropping enables them to gather information for their Dad about airport robberies. Friends and family are astonished when Frank and Joe are framed!


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Frank and Joe graduate from highschool together and have a summer to enjoy. Timely eavesdropping enables them to gather information for their Dad about airport robberies. Friends and family are astonished when Frank and Joe are framed!

30 review for The Great Airport Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Another exciting adventure with Frank and Joe. Often, the adventures come with new vehicles: cars, boats and most recently in #8, an iceboat! In #9, we get lots of plans including a seaplane, adventures and hijinks in an airport and an airplane parts factory as well as outdoor thrills on a mountain side, on an island and in Montana. There is even a ghost story again! A fun and joyful read and naturally, the Hardys solve the case up to the last paragraph!

  2. 5 out of 5

    C. (friends, please call me by name)

    Melanie Rehak’s essay about the Stratemeyer Syndicate is illuminating. She explains why there is a “full story” and “chopped” version of the novels. I used to aim for glossy copies but choose the oldies now that I know. The original ones flow with detail and balance around the action. Nancy is more of a tomboy, than prim. I am told the later rewrite of “The Great Airport Mystery” is an entirely different story, in an attempt to modernize the plot. My book is the original and it is a very good on Melanie Rehak’s essay about the Stratemeyer Syndicate is illuminating. She explains why there is a “full story” and “chopped” version of the novels. I used to aim for glossy copies but choose the oldies now that I know. The original ones flow with detail and balance around the action. Nancy is more of a tomboy, than prim. I am told the later rewrite of “The Great Airport Mystery” is an entirely different story, in an attempt to modernize the plot. My book is the original and it is a very good one! I wish I had written notes in March, to remind me why I gave three stars. The police chief, whom all the Hardys have helped a great deal by volume #9, presumed Frank & Joe were guilty and had to be pushed by Fenton, to consider that they were framed. I recall now, also, that I found the idea of hijacking mail planes an extreme means of stealing money. Perhaps I am influenced by Sandra Bullock’s subtle genius in the recent 2018 film, “Ocean’s Eight” but even in 1930, there are much easier ways to money-grab. If we suspend disbelief, this entailed marvellously hands-on heroism, on the boys’ parts. At the beginning, they overhead a few convenient conversations but made a realistic effort to track, anticipate, and even follow thieves by hiding in their plane’s cargo hold! This was refreshingly intellectual as well as physical. My version weaves a gratifying family and friendship background around all of it. As a matter of fact, we witness Frank’s & Joe’s high school graduation and a farewell picnic, that their whole class shares on the beach! It is neatly explained that they graduated together, because Frank was sick for a term. Benefactors they helped in preceding mysteries, come to their aid.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    My grandson is reading this series. My son-in-law mentioned that the books didn't have the "feel" of the 1920/30s which got me thinking about how updates might have changed them. To assess how the newer versions compared with the original, I picked up 2 copies of this book at a used book store. One is the original version from 1930 and the other is from 1993. I planned to give them to my grandson to read side by side to see what changes he could spot. First I would read both books. Guess what--t My grandson is reading this series. My son-in-law mentioned that the books didn't have the "feel" of the 1920/30s which got me thinking about how updates might have changed them. To assess how the newer versions compared with the original, I picked up 2 copies of this book at a used book store. One is the original version from 1930 and the other is from 1993. I planned to give them to my grandson to read side by side to see what changes he could spot. First I would read both books. Guess what--these are NOT the same book. They have entirely different plots! That was not necessary. I noticed a few things that most parents today would like modified. One would be this sentence:"It was certainly mighty white of Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Applegate to go bail for us." Also the ad at the end for another book that said that the Hardy Boys think "girls are all right--in their place!" In the original, the existence of air mail is a major plot point. Kids today might not "get" that mail got there faster if you paid extra for air mail, but that could easily be worked in. Maybe a term like "automobile robes" would need a sentence to explain, but all in all the original story was better than the new one and should have been kept. The new book could have had a different title so as not to confuse people. My four stars are for the the original version. The newer one is a three star book. However that version might be a better match for some kids. It is 35 pages shorter and has some pictures.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeena

    This book was the starting point to my journey through the Hardy Boys world. Loved it. Age rating:10+

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Frank and Joe Hardy are driving when a small plane nearly totals their car when its wheels touch the roof. A mystery ensues, with Frank and Joe going undercover in a factory to figure out what's going on in a potential smuggling operation. The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew are great little reads from my childhood and I like to pick one up every once in a while. Not as great as when I was a kid, but still fun. Frank and Joe Hardy are driving when a small plane nearly totals their car when its wheels touch the roof. A mystery ensues, with Frank and Joe going undercover in a factory to figure out what's going on in a potential smuggling operation. The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew are great little reads from my childhood and I like to pick one up every once in a while. Not as great as when I was a kid, but still fun.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bill Riggs

    The teen sleuths investigate an air theft scheme leading to thrilling aerial adventure in planes, helicopters and even a seaplane. The action and mystery starts in their hometown of Bayport and continues to caves and a tropical island.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    The Great Airport Mystery is (I think) the first Hardy Boys book I've read and while it was a little confusing in the beginning, I ended up liking the story. The characters were fun and I liked the whole secret cave that fit an airplane. The Great Airport Mystery is (I think) the first Hardy Boys book I've read and while it was a little confusing in the beginning, I ended up liking the story. The characters were fun and I liked the whole secret cave that fit an airplane.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    The Hardy Boys return in another classic mystery tale from this mystery book series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    I was not disappointed with this one! I hadn’t read “Airport” since I was a kid in the 1960s so needless to say, I didn’t remember anything about the story. Some of my favorites as a kid were “Tower Treasure,” “House on the Cliff,” “Missing Chums,” and “Cabin Island”– all written by Leslie McFarlane. I don’t remember considering “Airport” as a favorite but I’m not sure why. It was a great story. It starts out with the boys going to the new Bayport airport in their roadster and being practically I was not disappointed with this one! I hadn’t read “Airport” since I was a kid in the 1960s so needless to say, I didn’t remember anything about the story. Some of my favorites as a kid were “Tower Treasure,” “House on the Cliff,” “Missing Chums,” and “Cabin Island”– all written by Leslie McFarlane. I don’t remember considering “Airport” as a favorite but I’m not sure why. It was a great story. It starts out with the boys going to the new Bayport airport in their roadster and being practically run off the road by a plane apparently trying to land. The plane crashes and the pilot blames the boys for the crash. The pilot had been drinking and was later fired as a mail pilot because of this. This story was written in 1930 during prohibition so drinking was against the law at the time and I guess the pilot could have been arrested for this. Anyway, after this great start to the story, the next 50 pages or so focus on the graduation from high school of both Frank and Joe (it is explained that they were in the same grade because Frank had been ill one year). This includes a class picnic where Chet eats everything in sight and is then disappointed because he didn’t have room to eat chocolate cake! The story includes all of the boys’ chums including Biff, Tony, Phil, and Jerry Gilroy (who I didn’t really remember). The story also provides some good continuity from previous stories including recaps of “Tower Treasure” and the previous volume “Cabin Island.” Both Hurd Applegate from “Treasure” and Elroy Jefferson from “Cabin” put in appearances and play a role in the story. And, as part of the story, the boys actually revisit Cabin Island and get caught in an obligatory storm in the bay. I really like McFarlane’s writing style and his use of words – some a little antiquated now, but very colorful. The pace of this story wasn’t near as frenetic as some of the later stories where the Hardys take off to distant locations at a drop of a hat. Of course, this story is the first time the Hardys even ride in an airplane. The actual “mystery” in this story doesn’t get going until after page 50. It basically involves a plot to steal a $50,000 payroll from a mail plane by the pilot of the plane that ran the Hardys off the road and a couple of his nefarious cohorts. In the mean time, the Hardys get framed for an earlier mail robbery and wind up getting arrested. Part of the evidence against them was a footprint of Joe's new shoes that were left at the airport. His shoe size was only a six! High school kids must have had smaller feet in those days! Applegate and Jefferson bail the boys out of jail which allows them to follow the crooks by hiding as stowaways in the tail of a plane the bad guys had purchased to assist in the $50,000 heist. (Before stowing away in the plane, the boys buy some provisions including a couple of “automobile robes” to keep warm in the plane. I’ve never heard of an automobile robe – I assume it was something like a blanket used for passengers in open-air cars to keep warm in those days.) To get at the cash, the crooks force another mail plane out of the sky by lowering a rope from their plane into the propeller of the other plane – this was done at night (unlike the Rogers cover art) so the pilot must have been one heck of a stunt pilot to pull that off! The boys foil the robbery at the end by getting the drop on the crooks with some guns they had brought along (the guns hadn’t been mentioned in the story until the plane was forced down – I guess McFarlane forgot about this). Overall, an enjoyable read which made me realize why I enjoyed the Hardys so much as a kid growing up in the 60s. This one was very nostalgic!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a great book! This is a review more of the series as a whole. I grew up reading the Hardy Boys and I don't think there was a single story I didn't like. I'm now re-reading the series with my son. It's great to be able to share something I loved as a boy with my next generation. In reading the Hardy Boys again, I never realized when I was a kid that the books have all been re-writen and re-edited over the years. I'm okay with that because some of the content and terminology is a little dat This is a great book! This is a review more of the series as a whole. I grew up reading the Hardy Boys and I don't think there was a single story I didn't like. I'm now re-reading the series with my son. It's great to be able to share something I loved as a boy with my next generation. In reading the Hardy Boys again, I never realized when I was a kid that the books have all been re-writen and re-edited over the years. I'm okay with that because some of the content and terminology is a little dated. I was curious however about the differences in the versions of the stories, so I have been hitting used book stores and antique stores in order to put an original 1930's set of the books together so we can read the original text. The Great Airport Mystery is the first book I found and it's great. The book really has the flavor of the time in which it was written. Terminology like jalopy and roadster are used and I think now even though I enjoy the newer versions, I like these original versions better. I can't wait to get the whole original series and read them with my son!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bronson

    This was a lot of fun to read with my 8 year old son. I haven't read Hardy Boys books since I was 12 or 13 and I was pleasantly surprised at how good it was. There are some funny dated parts. I like how they refer to Chet as their "portly friend" and other wise making fun of his eating habits. This was a fun mystery, great suspence and the story moves right along. I think Dan Brown could have learned a lot about mystery writing if he'd paid more attention to the Hardy Boys. This was a lot of fun to read with my 8 year old son. I haven't read Hardy Boys books since I was 12 or 13 and I was pleasantly surprised at how good it was. There are some funny dated parts. I like how they refer to Chet as their "portly friend" and other wise making fun of his eating habits. This was a fun mystery, great suspence and the story moves right along. I think Dan Brown could have learned a lot about mystery writing if he'd paid more attention to the Hardy Boys.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    My kids love the Hardy Boys audio series. This is the last in the series that is available through overdrive.com so my son (11 yrs old) checked out the next three to read aloud.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nanci

    Fun blast from the past for me!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maggie A

    One day I will make a podcast where I read these books chapter by chapter with color commentary because this is all batshit. I hate it!!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ty Wilson

    The Hardy Boys. This series is an old series that not many people read anymore. I read them a few years ago and wanted to start reading them again. If you like mystery stories and detectives you will like this series. The book I am reading is The Great Airport Mystery. The author is Franklin W. Dixon. The main idea of this book is The Hardy Brothers tracking down a gang that steals valuable electronic parts from a mining company and are trying to get to the bottom of this weird secret. This book The Hardy Boys. This series is an old series that not many people read anymore. I read them a few years ago and wanted to start reading them again. If you like mystery stories and detectives you will like this series. The book I am reading is The Great Airport Mystery. The author is Franklin W. Dixon. The main idea of this book is The Hardy Brothers tracking down a gang that steals valuable electronic parts from a mining company and are trying to get to the bottom of this weird secret. This book is about finding thieves that frame an airplane crash as an accident but something is off with the story and they find out they are covering that up with thieves that steal expensive parts from a mining company. The first weird and suspicious part of the book is when a plane hits Joe and Franks car and topples it over in a private area. The brothers think it is suspicious and look into it more. They find clues at Stan wide Mining Equipment Company about the story of how a pilot was killed and the co-pilot survived. They believe they are doing something suspicious when they get all this weird stuff happening to them at the company. They explore that land and company and uncover the secrets. Read this book to find out what happens next! This book is very well made. It would appeal to people that love mysteries and detectives solving mysteries. The strengths of this book are making the book very suspenseful and twists and turns in this book. There really are no weaknesses to this book in my opinion. It was written very well and had a good plot and a good ending. Also the mysteries were very detailed and it made the book fun to read. My overall thought about this book was that it was a great book and had a great storyline as far as mysteries. Also, I loved how this book was put together to create the great suspense in the order it was written. As you can see this book is a very great book and if you are into old books with mystery or just mystery itself you will love this book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brentman99

    In the ninth book of the series, the Biys are asked to assist their father, Fenton, with his case and end up finding a mystery of their own. For the second book in a row, no one8s tied up, up it’s close. Suffice to say that other than a corny part about a ghost that is resolved in the last five pages, there is yet another happy ending. An interesting plot twist and careless criminals make this an easy case to solve. Another good book for a ten year-old.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Hammerhead

    When I was young, I read a lot of the Hardy Boys mysterys. Loved them back then. I found this book in an antique store for a dollar. This copy was published in 1930. This book is almost 90 years old.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    OK, my very first Hardy Boys and it really wasn't half bad. Somehow I've managed to make it this far avoiding them but my ten year old begged me to try one, so this one was his recommendation. I can see why boys love them. It had some exciting parts and Frank Hardy only gets knocked unconscious 3 or 4 times in this book. OK, my very first Hardy Boys and it really wasn't half bad. Somehow I've managed to make it this far avoiding them but my ten year old begged me to try one, so this one was his recommendation. I can see why boys love them. It had some exciting parts and Frank Hardy only gets knocked unconscious 3 or 4 times in this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Belyea

    Frank and Joe have been asked to investigate not only a series of airport robberies, chasing down a gang that seems to be stealing away hundreds of dollars in electronics, but must also solve the ghost that is seemingly haunting them through radio waves! Dixon will keep young readers entertained with another exciting tale following the Hardy's. Can the boys and their friends figure out the truth before the villains get away with their stolen treasure? Frank and Joe have been asked to investigate not only a series of airport robberies, chasing down a gang that seems to be stealing away hundreds of dollars in electronics, but must also solve the ghost that is seemingly haunting them through radio waves! Dixon will keep young readers entertained with another exciting tale following the Hardy's. Can the boys and their friends figure out the truth before the villains get away with their stolen treasure?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    A Quickie Review As consistent as this series is, there isn't much I can say about this book that I haven't already said in my previous reviews. An old-school mystery; "PG"-level peril; plenty of timeless appeal. What's not to like? Content Concerns: See above...or my previous reviews. Score: 4/5 A Quickie Review As consistent as this series is, there isn't much I can say about this book that I haven't already said in my previous reviews. An old-school mystery; "PG"-level peril; plenty of timeless appeal. What's not to like? Content Concerns: See above...or my previous reviews. Score: 4/5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    A solid entry in the Hardy Boys series, though I found it a bit more action\adventure and less mystery.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan Kelly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like to pretend there's an unknown Hardy Boys book out there; one without a mystery to solve or hoodlums to foil or sexually frustrated old maid aunts to taunt. One day, after school, the boys sit down at the kitchen table and snack on milk and cookies. After discussing their passive dating lives and the fingerprints they found on the old prospector's flashlight (at least it LOOKED like a flashlight), the brothers have their first serious discussion about their jobs as part-time gumshoes and a I like to pretend there's an unknown Hardy Boys book out there; one without a mystery to solve or hoodlums to foil or sexually frustrated old maid aunts to taunt. One day, after school, the boys sit down at the kitchen table and snack on milk and cookies. After discussing their passive dating lives and the fingerprints they found on the old prospector's flashlight (at least it LOOKED like a flashlight), the brothers have their first serious discussion about their jobs as part-time gumshoes and all the improbabilities and dangers that beset them daily. I imagine this exchange would take place: Frank: Joe? Joe: Yeah? Frank: In half of our cases, we've encountered circumstances involving supposedly supernatural events, right? Joe: Ghosts? Frank: Yeah, ghosts. Fifty percent of the time we end up interrogating someone who swears they saw or heard spooks rattling around an abandoned house or wandering through the woods or whatever. Joe: I think you're being stingy. It's more like 75 percent. And it doesn't seem to matter what the case involves: terrorists, smugglers, jewel thieves...we almost always run into someone who saw a specter out the corner of their eye. Frank: Yeah, and how many actual ghosts have we met, Joe? Joe: (Scoffs) Zero. It's always the wind whistling over an empty bottle, or a bed sheet dangling from a tree, or a Middle Eastern guy walking around the woods after midnight. What was that guy's deal anyway? It was the middle of winter, for crying out loud. Frank: Yeah, exactly. But we keep running into people—not just crazy cave hermits and bachelor pig farmers, mind you, but educated townsfolk—who just need a spooky voice on the phone or a footprint in the sand to make them swear to God they've seen the dead walk. Joe: Yeah... "Agggh! I got a postcard from Slippery Joe Dugan! But I'm pretty sure he died in that thresher accident last year! Even though we never found the body! And despite the fact someone is obviously living in the warehouse, since we found that sleeping bag with 'Property of Slippery Joe Dugan' stenciled on it!" Gosh darn it, Frank, it's embarrassing. Frank: Yeah, especially when Chet and Biff come along on a case. They always end up soiling themselves and gibbering about spooks at some point. Joe: (leans back) Yeah, that's weird. I think Biff forgets to crack a window whenever he builds ship models in his bedroom. Frank: (Rolls eyes) Yeah. Biff's using the glue to build "ship models." Joe: And Chet's family has lived on that farm for a long, long time. You know? (He raises his eyebrows.) Without much contact with other gene pools? Frank: Ew. Joe: Don't you have a date with his sister Iola tonight? Frank: (Horrified gape) Not any more. Anyway, I've got a theory about the rest of Bayport. I think some competent terrorist is dumping mercury and LSD into Barmet Bay. Now it's seeping into the water supply and brain-farting the populace. Joe: That WOULD explain why most of our cases are so easy to solve. Gee whiz, we don't even have to try anymore. Most of the bad guys immediately confess when we nab them. And we're beating the tar out of mobsters and mercenaries twice our size. Criminy-pete, last week we caught the suspect while he was drawing bank heist plans in chalk on our front porch and singing "Yankee Doodle" in his underwear. He gave Aunt Gertrude the vapors something fierce. Frank: (Sighs) Maybe it's time to move. The Great Airport Mystery is the latest Hardy Boys book I've finished reading to my son. Once captivated by tales of the boys Hardy, he's taken to perusing comic books or tapping his feet against the frame of his bunk bed while I read the books. I can't say I blame him for growing bored. For every Hardy tome providing a modicum of suspense and bloodless thrills, there's one that (1) the boys could have solved without getting out of bed, and/or (2) turns into a weird disjointed dreamscape barely held together by the antagonists' illogical actions. This one is the latter, wherein the Hardys show their winning investigatory technique of stumbling about and almost getting slaughtered before solving the case. The story starts with the brothers returning or going somewhere for whatever reason. Along one of Bayport's many winding isolated roads, they run into a badly piloted airplane. Properly, it almost lands on them. Soon after, the standard Hardy boy hermit/crazy farmer/bug-eyed ne'erdowell appears and shoos them off, cleverly hiding any likely shenanigans. Shaken but planning blood vengeance, when they arrive home, Fenton Hardy once more has a coincidental job for them. As usual, dad Hardy violates child protection laws (at least in younger Joe's case; you have to wonder why Frank hasn't moved out by now), by putting his sons to work as stalking horses at a mining equipment company beset by thievery. Frank and Joe make excellent undercover agents as the incredibly famous boy detective sons of a celebrity private detective, who've repeatedly busted up entire crime cartels, saboteur cells, and industrial espionage rings. Plainly, the lads, who have turned down thousands of dollars in reward money and whose parents are filthy rich enough to provide them with a car, motorcycles, speedboat, ice boat, and other vehicles, need jobs as gophers at the local mining equipment company where millions of dollars of mining equipment have gone missing. Foolproof! Mr. Allen, president of the Stanwide Mining Company, wisely puts them under the eye of the most suspicious pain in the ass at the factory, who, if he isn't one of the bad guys, plainly envies and hates the Hardys for their youth, beauty, money, and lives of adventure. In a pattern familiar to anyone who's worked a minimum wage gig, the boys are spoken to roughly, told that being a minute late will get them a pink slip, and are punished for their curiosity and lack of 37 pieces of flair by being almost crushed by several tons of scrap metal. Surely criminal masterminds are at work here who know that squishing the sons of a famous detective will remove all suspicion and not prompt an investigation. Shortly after their near-obliteration, the Hardys quit, because frig it, they'd rather get high and solve crimes and junk instead of this Pony Express shit. Nah, they just happen to discover the unknown gang was stealing mining equipment because it contains platinum, putting it on mysterious airplanes that deliver it somewhere or other. It was at this exact moment the author realized he had to eventually resolve the plot. As I recall, the Hardys started hanging out at a great airport, which seems mysterious as hell. They admire old biplanes at the... uh, I can't remember. The Bayport Old Biplanes Club? Here they make the friendly acquaintance of a pilot who offers to give the boys rides whenever they like, no strings. I think he also promised to show them puppies, buy them beer, and provide candy for the flight. Chet gets the first ride, which makes perfect sense, we are told, because he lives on a farm that will provide enough space to land the plane. Yup. Chet takes off, and six months later the Hardys are sleuthing over his bleached and gnawed bones, his pants pushed down to his skeletonized ankles. Ha ha! Not really, but it hearkens back to the days when nobody thought twice about teen boys scamming rides from bachelors with peculiar hobbies. I should note that fans of Chet Morton Food Humiliation Porn will be delighted to hear he's subject to a chocolate milk sploshing, (scroll down for art of Chet taking one to the face, believe it or not). Back in the 60s, "Franklin Dixon's" daughter had several books rewritten to accommodate modern tastes. I wonder what Chet was spattered with before? So, where was I? Wait, where were they? In the book they somehow make day trips from Massachusetts to Montana and the Caribbean. Perhaps Fenton Hardy can afford Cessnas with warp drives. The Hardys soon discover the legend of Clint Hill, a former pilot for the company who may have gone down with his plane on an earlier flight. Mr. Allen suspects he ran afoul of skyjackers, but he might as well have suspected gremlins, because of what happens next. Throughout the book, our hearty boys find remnants and traces of Clint Hill. A convenient shoe print preserved in cement at the airport of mystery, booga-booga phone calls from a man who sounds...an awful lot like Clint Hill, and sightings of a man...WHO LOOKS LIKE CLINT HILL. Now, does anyone actually say, "Hey, it's probably Clint Hill, a'ight?" Nope, and as I mentioned above, we hear the usual speculations that Clint Hill might be a g-g-g-g-ghost seeking revenge through ineffective prank calls. Like an episode of Scooby Doo, you wonder why Frank and Joe—in the place of Fred and Velma, the only two members of the Scooby Gang who weren't stoned or mentally deficient—say, "Look, it's some creep in a rubber mask using dry ice and a film projector, so let's just save time and look for the hidden room or secret passage or whatever. It's not like anyone is paying us to do this shit." Nope, everyone, including the boys think, "He's probably NOT a ghost...but what if he IS a ghost?" Empiricism is not Frank and Joe's strong suit this edition. After catching the bad guys through their usual "WHATHELL!?! CHARRRRRGE!!!" method, the book ends [SPOILER ALERT!] with the boys visiting Mr. Allen to fill him in on the details of the case, only to discover Clint Hill hanging out there (I imagine him looking like Dennis Hopper in Easy Rider and stinking of pot and rum drinks). I think I remember that he was discovered by the Caribbean locals who he hung out with for several years before deciding to return and NOT tell anyone he was alive. Instead he crank called the robbers to get them to confess and, for some reason, his good friend Mr. Allen. Allen, undoubtedly shell-shocked and internally weeping, quietly suffers a heart attack and perishes while the boys and his dick friend obliviously chortle over The Great Airport Mystery being solved, with Joe punning, "And that's the PLANE truth!". A few beats pass before Frank catches the whiff of evacuated bladder, looks over at the deceased plant manager, and says, quietly, "Mr. Allen...?" Nah, not really, But that's how I'D end this mess.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell Mollet

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Hardy Boys The Great Airport Mystery by Franklin W. Dixon was about the Hardy Boys that at trying to solve a mystery about stolen items from Stanwide Airport The story gives a third person view or the Hardy Boys and everyone else in the book. The brothers go threw a ton of life or death situations where it is action pact. They are always doing something in the story from almost crashing a plane or almost getting hit by a live grenade. There are also a lot of good parts that are filled with a The Hardy Boys The Great Airport Mystery by Franklin W. Dixon was about the Hardy Boys that at trying to solve a mystery about stolen items from Stanwide Airport The story gives a third person view or the Hardy Boys and everyone else in the book. The brothers go threw a ton of life or death situations where it is action pact. They are always doing something in the story from almost crashing a plane or almost getting hit by a live grenade. There are also a lot of good parts that are filled with action like when they take down two criminals and find where there stash is and when they find that there is criminal base set up in a whole entire mountain. The Hardy Boys The Great airport mystery was a great book and every other Hardy Boys book is also great. I loved how they would always be doin something fun and never something boring. They would always have some sort of way to get out of a problem. I liked how the book was realistic and could actually happen in real life. I loved how the author would put fun things in the story and how he would always make it interesting. I would recommend this story to people that love to be in suspense and people that love cliffhangers. I would also recommend this book to people that love mystery and crime cases.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Book collector

    Ok this isn't a specific review of the books. There are quite a few hardy boys books and I read them over a period of several years but that was around 30-35 years ago now. Some I remember clearly and I will be specific about those at the end of this part of the review. This section is really an overview of the series. Franklin w. Dixon was of course a syndicate name. A name used over many years on the hardy boys books. My father read them during the fifties, they started during the forties and Ok this isn't a specific review of the books. There are quite a few hardy boys books and I read them over a period of several years but that was around 30-35 years ago now. Some I remember clearly and I will be specific about those at the end of this part of the review. This section is really an overview of the series. Franklin w. Dixon was of course a syndicate name. A name used over many years on the hardy boys books. My father read them during the fifties, they started during the forties and by the end of the the 1980's I'd collected a full set up to around number 90 along with the first 25 or so casefiles books. They were enjoyable books. Fairly simple, but generally well written mysteries. They followed a basic pattern. The hardy boys father would either disappear working on a case or go off to work a case, the boys would get involved in a curious but not terribly threatening mystery in which they and their friends would regularly be captured, escape, repeat as needed. They would end with the boys in danger and then their father would turn up, save them and reveal they had both been working the same case. There are variations on the pattern of course and don't get me wrong I'm not knocking the familiar tropes of the series, that's what made these books fun to read. Some books were brilliant, some weaker but I rarely read one that was poor. All were well written by the various authors behind the dixon name. Now I'm going to digress for a moment. I had a problem with kids books when I was a kid. They weren't very exciting. But there was a reason that I felt this. In the 1970's through really up until the Harry Potter phenomenon in the late 1990's (be thankful for Rowling, as her success has paved the way for the brilliant children's book landscape we now have) children's books were fairly tame. I was spoiled when I was young. I love a TV show called doctor who. It began in the UK in 1963 and from 1973 fans of the show had the target doctor who books. These were adaptations of the TV stories. I started reading them at the age of 7. They spoiled kids books for me. Why? Because they were full of death. Characters actually died there was genuine threat with those books. Most kids literature at this period didn't do that. So I found myself reading adult books from the age of 12. Jack Higgins, Ian Fleming, Alistair maclean, Agatha Christie and more. I still read kids books, the hardy boys were a favourite of my father's so I happily read them. It's odd but I probably read more kids books now than i did as a kid! The kids books then were tame. They could be fun, but tame. The hardy boys series was the same. Fun but tame. Exciting but not threatening. Not really. The books tried to address this with the hardy boys casefiles. Slightly more adult, with greater threat. But by then I drifted away from new hardy boys books onto other things but I have a great affection for the series. And that's what this review is about. It's to give those wanting to try these books a idea of what to expect. The stories are fast paced. Normally featuring an intriguing mystery. Female characters can be a bit weak, especially in the early books but that's a sign of when they were written. There's action, humour and ghosts, smugglers, and lots of intriguing mystery all resolved well. The ghosts are always explained and the bad guys always caught. The hardy boys books are nostalgic fun. I spent many years enjoying them and have very fond memories of them.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    The Great Airport Mystery is #9 in the Hardy Boys series. I enjoyed reading about it, especially as I have an interest in planes and aviation. Turns out it is a story of theft of valuable equipment that the boys are charged with solving. There are bad guys of course, some planes, some helicopters, hidden airstrips, and of course more caves and underground hiding places. The boys show more of their fearless actions in pursuit of the main perpetrators, and they end up flying all over the country, The Great Airport Mystery is #9 in the Hardy Boys series. I enjoyed reading about it, especially as I have an interest in planes and aviation. Turns out it is a story of theft of valuable equipment that the boys are charged with solving. There are bad guys of course, some planes, some helicopters, hidden airstrips, and of course more caves and underground hiding places. The boys show more of their fearless actions in pursuit of the main perpetrators, and they end up flying all over the country, to the caribbean and then to Montana, it is really remarkable. Some of the story line stretches belief in terms of reality, but nonetheless it is a fun journey. The boys get involved in their typical sleuthing, and confrontations with the suspects. If they boys ever encountered villains with any smarts or weapons, things may end differently. But since there are about 50 more books in the series, we know nothing serious will happen to them. Still, sometimes they get into some scary and inadvisable situations. So again very enjoyable if not the best story in the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shreyans

    A nice mystery for pleasure reading. The Hardy boys along with their father work on a case of theft of platinum electronic components with short appearances of Chet & Biff. One thing that nagged me was that their father did almost nothing to solve the case and always kept commenting on how he had to tie some loose end but came up with no results. I think these books starring the Hardy brothers are right in presenting them as crucial in solving the case but undermining their father's role is no w A nice mystery for pleasure reading. The Hardy boys along with their father work on a case of theft of platinum electronic components with short appearances of Chet & Biff. One thing that nagged me was that their father did almost nothing to solve the case and always kept commenting on how he had to tie some loose end but came up with no results. I think these books starring the Hardy brothers are right in presenting them as crucial in solving the case but undermining their father's role is no way to go about it. Maybe the author could have given the case to the boys and not included their father in it or atleast show some of his contribution to the case, when they harp about how such a great detective he is!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    Someone is stealing valuable platinum machine parts from a mining equipment company. The disappearances are happening during transport from the company headquarters. The deliveries are done by the company's own air freight service that flies of Bayport Airport. In solving the mystery the boys get to fly around in all sorts of aircraft, including a single engine plane, a helicopter, and a PBY/flying boat. The boys waste no time in furthering their long march to dementia. The both get the KO on ju Someone is stealing valuable platinum machine parts from a mining equipment company. The disappearances are happening during transport from the company headquarters. The deliveries are done by the company's own air freight service that flies of Bayport Airport. In solving the mystery the boys get to fly around in all sorts of aircraft, including a single engine plane, a helicopter, and a PBY/flying boat. The boys waste no time in furthering their long march to dementia. The both get the KO on just page 4 when a low flying plane flips their car. As if that is not bad enough, they are getting sub-concussive trauma injuries almost every chapter. These guys deserve their own wing at the Muhammad Ali Institute. The KO Count stands at: Book: 2 Series: 7

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Adams

    The Hardy Boys are involved in a mystery concerning stolen parts from Stanwide Mining Equipment Company. First they get a job at the company to get an inside look but when that proves too dangerous they "get fired" and spy a different way. It all seems to be connected to a strange accident years ago where Clint Hill was killed in a plane crash. Clint's footsteps and his voice start showing up all over....is it Clint's ghost come back to haunt people who did him wrong? Because planes are involved The Hardy Boys are involved in a mystery concerning stolen parts from Stanwide Mining Equipment Company. First they get a job at the company to get an inside look but when that proves too dangerous they "get fired" and spy a different way. It all seems to be connected to a strange accident years ago where Clint Hill was killed in a plane crash. Clint's footsteps and his voice start showing up all over....is it Clint's ghost come back to haunt people who did him wrong? Because planes are involved there are quite a few plane trips searching for clues. A few close calls and the boys know the crooks are onto them making their searching harder and more dangerous.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mlmoore

    I've read several Hardy Boys adventures, as a child, and still do on occasion, when I get a chance to go to the library. Because of Frank and Joe Hardy, Nancy Drew, and Trixie Belden, I wanted to become a private eye, but being told, by someone I loved (my dad), I would not make a good one, made me abandon that dream. Don't make fun of your children, instead encourage them...after all...They are the future of this world I've read several Hardy Boys adventures, as a child, and still do on occasion, when I get a chance to go to the library. Because of Frank and Joe Hardy, Nancy Drew, and Trixie Belden, I wanted to become a private eye, but being told, by someone I loved (my dad), I would not make a good one, made me abandon that dream. Don't make fun of your children, instead encourage them...after all...They are the future of this world

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rick Bavera

    A book written in a more innocent time...generally, anyway. Hard to imagine teenagers doing all the things the Hardy Boys did in this book, and not being in far more danger than they were, and not being in real parental trouble, too. But still a fun read. I never read any of the Hardy Boys books when I was growing up...I read other sorts of books, like Henry Reed's Journey, and science fiction books. A book written in a more innocent time...generally, anyway. Hard to imagine teenagers doing all the things the Hardy Boys did in this book, and not being in far more danger than they were, and not being in real parental trouble, too. But still a fun read. I never read any of the Hardy Boys books when I was growing up...I read other sorts of books, like Henry Reed's Journey, and science fiction books.

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