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Bringing Up Girls: Practical Advice And Encouragement For Those Shaping The Next Generation Of Women

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This is the ultimate guide to raising our daughters right--from parenting authority and trusted family counselor Dr. James Dobson. Peer pressure. Eating disorders. Decisions about love, romance, and sex. Academic demands. Life goals and how to achieve them. These are just some of the challenges that girls face today--and the age at which they encounter them is getting young This is the ultimate guide to raising our daughters right--from parenting authority and trusted family counselor Dr. James Dobson. Peer pressure. Eating disorders. Decisions about love, romance, and sex. Academic demands. Life goals and how to achieve them. These are just some of the challenges that girls face today--and the age at which they encounter them is getting younger and younger. As a parent, how are you guiding your daughter on her journey to womanhood? Are you equipping her to make wise choices? Whether she's still playing with dolls or in the midst of the often-turbulent teen years, is she truly secure in her identity as your valued and loved daughter? In the New York Times bestseller Bringing Up Girls, Dr. James Dobson will help you face the challenges of raising your daughters to become strong, healthy, and confident women who excel in life.


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This is the ultimate guide to raising our daughters right--from parenting authority and trusted family counselor Dr. James Dobson. Peer pressure. Eating disorders. Decisions about love, romance, and sex. Academic demands. Life goals and how to achieve them. These are just some of the challenges that girls face today--and the age at which they encounter them is getting young This is the ultimate guide to raising our daughters right--from parenting authority and trusted family counselor Dr. James Dobson. Peer pressure. Eating disorders. Decisions about love, romance, and sex. Academic demands. Life goals and how to achieve them. These are just some of the challenges that girls face today--and the age at which they encounter them is getting younger and younger. As a parent, how are you guiding your daughter on her journey to womanhood? Are you equipping her to make wise choices? Whether she's still playing with dolls or in the midst of the often-turbulent teen years, is she truly secure in her identity as your valued and loved daughter? In the New York Times bestseller Bringing Up Girls, Dr. James Dobson will help you face the challenges of raising your daughters to become strong, healthy, and confident women who excel in life.

30 review for Bringing Up Girls: Practical Advice And Encouragement For Those Shaping The Next Generation Of Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    Despite its subtitle, this book has remarkably little practical advice to offer on raising girls and is considerably more discouraging than encouraging. "Bringing Up Girls" is primarily a social commentary on the decadence of modern society, the ill effects of feminism, and the challenges facing girls. As a social commentary, it profusely quotes other (often superior) social commentaries I have already read, including the writings of Wendy Shalit, Dr. Grossman, and Michelle Malkin. There is scar Despite its subtitle, this book has remarkably little practical advice to offer on raising girls and is considerably more discouraging than encouraging. "Bringing Up Girls" is primarily a social commentary on the decadence of modern society, the ill effects of feminism, and the challenges facing girls. As a social commentary, it profusely quotes other (often superior) social commentaries I have already read, including the writings of Wendy Shalit, Dr. Grossman, and Michelle Malkin. There is scarce original material in this book; Dr. Dobson’s direct quotes sometimes run as long as three full pages, and occasionally he even quotes himself at length (inserting large blocks of text from other books or articles he has written). There are pages and pages of transcripts from radio broadcasts and discussions with teenage girls, which can become quite tedious. What practical advice he does offer is primarily focused on self-esteem and a girl’s need for affirmation of her physical beauty, as if a girl’s sole concern is and always will be to attract boys. There is very little about a girl’s need to have her intelligence or her talents praised, about academic concerns or challenges facing girls, about the intellectual education of girls in general, about helping girls to discern their vocations, about raising a girl, indeed, to have any deep personal interest beyond that of a girlfriend, wife, or mother. Not that the calling of a wife and mother isn’t significant and honorable, and not that I haven’t pursued those roles myself, but not every woman will become a wife, not every wife will become a mother, and not every wife and a mother will be solely a wife and a mother. There were times when, for me, Dobson’s traditionalism (with which I am okay) seemed to cross over into chauvinism (with which I am not okay). Perhaps it is only Dr. Dobson’s frequently condescending tone (complemented by an excessive use of exclamation points) that leads me to think his views border on chauvinism. One early passage caused me to shake my head. Dr. Dobson is talking about how we need to teach our little girl manners, such as where to place silverware, to put a napkin in her lap, not to talk with her mouth full, and not to belch or pick her teeth at the table. He then says, “Although I am not an expert in teaching girls some of the social graces I have named (I learned a masculine version of the rules), I know them when I see them.” So, dear Doctor, do tell, what precisely is the *masculine version* of not belching at the table? Do men place the napkin on their heads? I mean, I understand you do not think a boy would ever need to be taught where to place the silverware, since he must always expect to have a woman in his life, whether wife or mother, to wait upon him, but surely the *masculine version* of not picking one’s teeth at the dinner table cannot be too terribly different from the *feminine version* of not picking one’s teeth at the dinner table? Dr. Dobson does frequently site statistics to support his assertions, but if you are fairly well read on the topics he discusses, you may often note his very selective use of studies. There are also times when he offers no hard data at all to support his assertions. For example, he says sleepovers should be a thing of the past because pedophilia and molestation are so much more common today than they used to be. Yet he doesn’t actually marshal any hard statistics to back this claim of rampant pedophilia. In fact, there was a substantial decline in child molestation cases in the 1990’s. Instead of noting this positive news, however, Dr. Dobson trots out the old cliché that the world has changed and become more dangerous and that it just isn’t as safe as it was when we were kids. Indeed, quite a bit of what he says in this book seems to feed the parental culture of fear that has contributed to the modern trend of helicopter parenting. There’s a lot of doom and gloom about the state of society, but not as much practical advice as there is warning. The evangelical preoccupation with sex shines through in this book. Don’t get me wrong – I’m all for teaching my daughter the virtue of chastity and self-respect and the danger of dressing like a Bratz doll and getting fall-down drunk at a frat party. I’m not talking about that – I’m talking about this near-obsession with the potential danger of anything in any way related to sex. Dobson moves from sex-related concern to sex-related concern in “Bringing Up Girls.” He repeatedly expresses horror at the idea of a girl taking the initiative in a romantic relationship (i.e. asking a boy on a date or making it known that she is interested in him); he suggests that fathers are going to feel awkward because of their “involuntary attraction” to their “developed” adolescent daughters but that they ought to hug them plenty anyway; he insists that a mom not let her daughter’s friend sleep over while only her husband is at home because even though “the motives” of her husband are “probably” honorable, “the potential for danger is just TOO great”; he rules out entirely the possibility of a teenage boy ever babysitting another child because “there is so much going on sexually within males at that age”; and he describes puberty as a time of constant and overwhelming hormonal crisis with ”additional dangers for early maturing girls”. At least he doesn’t seem nearly as concerned that you might do something that contributes to turning your daughter into a lesbian as he was that your parenting failures might turn your son gay in “Bringing up Boys.” In “Bringing up Girls,” he’s less concerned about the threat of homosexuality and more concerned that you might turn your daughter into a heterosexual young woman who doesn’t wait patiently and silently by the phone. Despite being an evangelical Christian in charge of a Christian organization, Dr. Dobson inserts Christianity toward the end of his book almost as an afterthought. He seems far more concerned with promoting social and moral conservatism than with promoting the Gospel. (I am reminded of what C.S. Lewis had to say about people using the Gospel as a means to some other end.) Dobson does make some good points, such as that fathers should affirm their girls and be a regularly involved part of their lives, that it’s not good for girls, psychologically speaking, to be treated like (and to see other girls treated like) a hunk of meat, and that one should keep an eye on their kids' use of technology (the best chapter of the book, which was not written by Dobson at all, but by another member of Focus on the Family). Of course, I’m not sure I needed to read an entire book by Dr. Dobson to be made aware of any of these things, all of which are discussed extensively elsewhere. There are some sections in this book I do think dads should read because of their insight into the challenges girls (specifcially) face and their encouragement to fathers to be deeply involved in the lives of their girls.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    You know that question: If there is one person you could have coffee with - who would it be? My person would indubitably be Dr. James Dobson. I can't give Dobson enough praise for this highly insightful and brilliantly researched book. Childrearing is a daunting endeavor; however, with practical wisdom and a strong foundation in the Lord, it doesn't seem as overwhelming. I'm so very appreciative to Dobson for taking the time to write this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sally Stanfill

    I loved this book. Some may consider it radical and caught in the olden days, but I think it is necessary and challenging and a call for us to take our role as parents seriously, recognizing the great privilege and responsibility that it is. I pulled so many great things from this book and will be coming back to it as my daughter continues to get older.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becky Giovagnoni

    I was very skeptical about this book from the start. I basically read it so I would be able to talk knowledgeably about why I disliked it. But what I discovered was that despite some major issues with Dr. Dobson's book, there are still a few parts that were so insightful I think they make it worth reading. My main complaint about this book is that Dr. Dobson narrows down morality to whether or not a girl has premarital sex - if she does, she's immoral and if she doesn't she's moral. This, in my o I was very skeptical about this book from the start. I basically read it so I would be able to talk knowledgeably about why I disliked it. But what I discovered was that despite some major issues with Dr. Dobson's book, there are still a few parts that were so insightful I think they make it worth reading. My main complaint about this book is that Dr. Dobson narrows down morality to whether or not a girl has premarital sex - if she does, she's immoral and if she doesn't she's moral. This, in my opinion, is ridiculous and is a major flaw with how many live out the evangelical Christian lifestyle. It focuses solely on external behavior and ignores the heart. Raising moral children is not about behavior management, but about guiding and influencing a child's heart. The behavior is just a reflection of where the heart is. Dobson's continuous and obsessive focus on premarital sex completely drowned out any other point he might have tried to make. Another complaint is that a large portion of this book (at least five different chapters or large portions of them) were merely reprinted articles or transcripts of his radio broadcast. It was like he took the easy route and just repurposed work he (or someone else) had already done. This surprised me. And one other complaint is that the language he uses in this book makes him seem old and completely out of touch with today's culture. He uses the word "sexpot" several times in reference to what our daughters might become. He also equated body piercings and tattoos - even one time mentioning a nose ring - with cutting and mutilating the body. However, that said, I found a lot of value in the parts where Dobson was speaking as a doctor and not an evangelical. He introduced me to the idea of "juvenile puberty" which completely explained my highly dramatic two and half year old. The information about what happens physiologically to children (both in and out of the womb) was fascinating. I also appreciated the emphasis and all the insights on how important a father is in raising a daughter. Read this book with a large grain (or even a shaker full) of salt.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mandy J. Hoffman

    MY REVIEW: The title of this book pretty much sums up the overall point of this book - bringing up Girls. I, along with many other parents of girls, desire to know how best to raise our daughters, especially during those moments of drama, emotions, and crying that even us grown-up girls just don't "get". Dr. Dobson presents the basic make-up of a girl both emotionally and physically which aids you in better understanding what girls are experiencing at the various stages they go through. Through ou MY REVIEW: The title of this book pretty much sums up the overall point of this book - bringing up Girls. I, along with many other parents of girls, desire to know how best to raise our daughters, especially during those moments of drama, emotions, and crying that even us grown-up girls just don't "get". Dr. Dobson presents the basic make-up of a girl both emotionally and physically which aids you in better understanding what girls are experiencing at the various stages they go through. Through out this book he has great insight as well as some practical direction that will help parents of girls. However, for as good as the advice may be, there is one component that really bothers me. Dr. Dobson uses self-esteem as the primary area to focus on in order to "cure" the problems our girls - young and old - face on a routine basis. In my personal opinion based on the lens of Scripture, our girls don't need more self-esteem, they need the love and esteem of Jesus Christ. While Dobson talks about the importance of faith, I feel that he misses the extent and power of the Word of God and the love of God to overcome the challenges our daughters face. I greatly appreciate some of the concepts and thoughts Dr. Dobson shares, especially his concern for preparing your child for adolescents. But due to the amount of stuff I don't agree with, I can not recommend this book for reading. If you have all the time in the world to read then I might say "read it with great discernment", but if you do not have much time I think there are better parenting books to read that will give sound Biblical advice. * * * * * This review copy was provided Tyndale House Publishers, but the opinions expressed are purely my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Pastoralmusings

    James Dobson has certainly written a helpful book. Bringing Up Girls brings together the best of research concerning trends that affect girls today as well as timeless truth about the need for parent to be, well, parents to their girls. As a father I was especially interested to read what Dobson had to say about the role of fathers in the raising of their girls. I was not disappointed, but was challenged to be a better father because of this book. Dads, we are needed in our homes and we are neede James Dobson has certainly written a helpful book. Bringing Up Girls brings together the best of research concerning trends that affect girls today as well as timeless truth about the need for parent to be, well, parents to their girls. As a father I was especially interested to read what Dobson had to say about the role of fathers in the raising of their girls. I was not disappointed, but was challenged to be a better father because of this book. Dads, we are needed in our homes and we are needed by our daughters. Dobson points out that girls are different from boys (sadly, we need to be reminded of that in our day) and have unique needs. He then points out to us how to respond to those needs. One thing that I appreciate is how Dobson brings in the relevant issues of today's media saturation and the dangers of online media. At the same time he makes this something that will not necessarily be dated when the media changes. In all of these things Dobson reminds parents to be proactive, involved, firm, and loving as they deal with their daughters. One thing that stood out to me was that Dobson emphasized the need of girls to feel beautiful. They need affirmation from their mothers and their fathers. This is indeed important. I can see that in my own five year old daughter. While we must affirm their own unique beauty, fathers must also care enough to set boundaries so that their daughters will have the security of being cared for, protected, and loved. So very many positive things could be said about this book. I shall simply conclude by recommending it to those who have daughters. It is helpful and needful. Thanks to Tyndale for this review copy. It was provided freely with no expectation of a positive review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Colene Hardy

    I'm a collector of parental literature. I love being a parent and I love the scientific method. There are answers to most of our problems in books, including those we run into with our babies. So I read multiple books and try multiple methods until I find something that works for me and for my daughters. This book, however, was God-awful (pun intended). Didn't finish it. So much of what he says annoys me. And his harping on sex, sex, sex is bothersome too. Super chauvinistic. I wish someone had I'm a collector of parental literature. I love being a parent and I love the scientific method. There are answers to most of our problems in books, including those we run into with our babies. So I read multiple books and try multiple methods until I find something that works for me and for my daughters. This book, however, was God-awful (pun intended). Didn't finish it. So much of what he says annoys me. And his harping on sex, sex, sex is bothersome too. Super chauvinistic. I wish someone had told me how focused he is on religion and what an agenda he has. His constant harping on the "good old days" is such BS. Right Dobson, because it was better when women didn't have any choices and they couldn't vote. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for traditional values when it comes to manners and respecting adults; for doing chores, learning humility, kindness, charity, responsibility, moral strength and a host of other character traits. But this book doesn't seem to be a help to me in raising my girls to be any of those things. (okay maybe there's some stuff that was okay, but overall, I can safely say that I think this book is a waste of parent's time).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is a very comprehensive book on raising Christian girls in today's world. Dr. Dobson addresses many issues, including teaching girls to be ladies, purity, how to protect our daughters from technology, and the importance of both mother and father to a girl. He cites a lot of research, gives anecdotal evidence, and quotes from other sources to support his ideas. This book gave me a lot to think about and things for my husband and I to discuss, once he reads it, pertaining to our own girls. I This is a very comprehensive book on raising Christian girls in today's world. Dr. Dobson addresses many issues, including teaching girls to be ladies, purity, how to protect our daughters from technology, and the importance of both mother and father to a girl. He cites a lot of research, gives anecdotal evidence, and quotes from other sources to support his ideas. This book gave me a lot to think about and things for my husband and I to discuss, once he reads it, pertaining to our own girls. I really liked that this book is written from a Christian perspective and acknowledges that girls have an innate desire to know that they're beautiful and worth fighting for. So much in today's culture seems to focus on not addressing beauty and instead focuses on teaching girls that they are equal to boys and can/should do everything they do. I personally don't agree with this and Dr. Dobson gives a great explanation on how boys and girls are different neurologically. He devotes individual chapters to the relationship between mothers and daughters and fathers and daughters, citing the importance of each parent and offering suggestions for alternatives if one parent is absent. While a lot of the information in this book can leave a parent feeling worried and afraid for their daughter, he has an excellent discussion on what is great about girls, giving promising statistics and sharing how girls are beginning to understand that morality and modesty are important to them. I think this a book that should be read by anyone raising a girl. I highly recommend it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I wanted to like this book a lot. But it fell short of my expectations. I do like Dobson and have participated in some of his child development/ discipline/ instructing children studies. The strength of the book is in the data and information about the cultural landscape our daughters face and how they can and will be affected by media, promiscuity, etc, but there is not a great deal of practical advice. More like "keep your eyes open" parents. I prayed that God would show me what to glean from t I wanted to like this book a lot. But it fell short of my expectations. I do like Dobson and have participated in some of his child development/ discipline/ instructing children studies. The strength of the book is in the data and information about the cultural landscape our daughters face and how they can and will be affected by media, promiscuity, etc, but there is not a great deal of practical advice. More like "keep your eyes open" parents. I prayed that God would show me what to glean from this book, and I'd encourage all Christians to do the same when they read Christian literature. For me, I gleaned the most in realizing that hormones CAN and DO affect women, and their daughters. When my daughter is having a melt down, I have more compassion on her inability to "pull it together" because I have had moments like that, where my world seems to be falling apart while the reality is just a few dust bunnies and a sink full of dishes. I'm sure God will show you what He needs to show you if you ask.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Cusick-Bristol

    Some people thought that Dr. Dobson's format was not the greatest. I kind of wonder if these people have ever read a self-help book before, because his format (advice, stats, personal stories, etc.) was common for this type of book. My favorite part was the technology section. Thanks to him I now know about more options to protect my daughters from inappropriate footage on TV and in movies. Where was this technology when Twilight came out? Because my step-daugher is obsessed with it and it is VE Some people thought that Dr. Dobson's format was not the greatest. I kind of wonder if these people have ever read a self-help book before, because his format (advice, stats, personal stories, etc.) was common for this type of book. My favorite part was the technology section. Thanks to him I now know about more options to protect my daughters from inappropriate footage on TV and in movies. Where was this technology when Twilight came out? Because my step-daugher is obsessed with it and it is VERY inappropriate for her 10-year-old eyes. I also liked his appendix for additional resources, and will be buying some of the books he recommended. This book made me laugh, cry, and I pray I will put into practice what I learned.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Bah.... If you want to be terrified of our hypersexualized culture and what it means for girls, read this book. I felt like most of the book focused on what's between girls legs, than what was in her head and heart. If you missed sex-ed and need to be reaquainted with hormones and what happens during puberty, read this. There were some good messages in here about the importance of a strong, loving, affectionate father - the impact he has on a developing girl. A good reminder for me on the import Bah.... If you want to be terrified of our hypersexualized culture and what it means for girls, read this book. I felt like most of the book focused on what's between girls legs, than what was in her head and heart. If you missed sex-ed and need to be reaquainted with hormones and what happens during puberty, read this. There were some good messages in here about the importance of a strong, loving, affectionate father - the impact he has on a developing girl. A good reminder for me on the importance of filtering movies, internet content... I kept hoping it would get better. It didnt.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I liked some of it. A lot of what I liked was quotes from other authors. I wish there was more meat, and not so much of "this is the world your girls are living in". I wanted more specific ideas on how to raise my daughters better than I already am. I didn't get a lot of that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I’ve been wanting to read this book since it was released and now that I’ve read it I’m glad that I did. I’m not going to say that I agree with everything in this book – Dr. Dobson seems to think dating is the only way a girl is going to meet her future husband, but this is only going to lead to heartache and having different pieces of her heart being given away before she truly marries. There is a lot of good information in this book, and to me it doesn’t matter if Dr. Dobson quotes other sourc I’ve been wanting to read this book since it was released and now that I’ve read it I’m glad that I did. I’m not going to say that I agree with everything in this book – Dr. Dobson seems to think dating is the only way a girl is going to meet her future husband, but this is only going to lead to heartache and having different pieces of her heart being given away before she truly marries. There is a lot of good information in this book, and to me it doesn’t matter if Dr. Dobson quotes other sources or not, the information needs to be given out and I know I personally don’t have the time to read every, single book he mentions so having it condensed into one book is a huge and valuable time saver for me. As a conservative Christian I do understand the importance of bringing up my girls to be pure, modest and chaste. This may seem old fashioned to the world at large, but so many girls are falling into depression, self mutilation, as well as heartache by giving their hearts to one boy after another, giving their bodies to boy after boy and chasing them – girls have become the aggressors and Dr. Dobson points out exactly why this isn’t good for girls and for boys. The importance of having a dad who is Christian and is there for them is stressed – dads shouldn’t back off when their daughters are turning into young ladies – because they need them all the more. I appreciate the candidness of the answers Dr. Dobson gives to parents such as a sleep over with female friend when only the dad is home – he says of course that it’s a bad idea. This is so true, my husband has seen first hand what a false accusation can do when a co-worker was accused by his step-daughter, one cannot take their reputation or their family’s safety for granted. Some of the writing is common sense, such as the rise of pedophilia, but it isn’t done in a way that would scare the reader, in fact it just backed up everything I’ve already known, from studying social work, being involved in the mental health arena – most of what he said wasn’t new to me but was still an eye opener. As a victim of bullying I know the damage that is done, both in private and public schools, there are some, like me, who overcame it and no longer let the victimization live on but there are others whose lives are ruined because of long term bullying that isn’t stopped. Overall, I think this is a good book and a must read for every mom and dad who are trying to bring up girls in a “unisex”, “feministic”, and “anti-feminine” culture. We have to know what we are up against so that our girls can grow into godly young ladies and eventually be women who go out to the serve the Lord but can do so with their confidence, hearts and purity intact. This book also affirmed in me why we home educate our children – it’s not to hide them from the world but to make sure when they enter the world they do so with a firm foundation in the Lord. Home education isn’t perfect and my oldest has already been exposed to girls who bully and intimidate, but thankfully she knows that we can talk and we can deal with it from a godly perspective. Again, while I don’t agree with everything in this book, the majority of it was very worth the time it took to read it. **Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishing in exchange for posting my honest opinion, no other compensation was given.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alycia Morales

    I have long respected Dr. Dobson for his wisdom and knowledge concerning the well-being of families. I've admired his writings and ministry since before I was ever married or had my own children. He is a resource I always turn to when concerned with any aspect of marriage, parenting or family matters. Many years ago, I purchased Bringing Up Boys. I had two of my own and one step-son at the time. I now have three of my own, and my step-son is grown and on his own. I loved the book and the insight I have long respected Dr. Dobson for his wisdom and knowledge concerning the well-being of families. I've admired his writings and ministry since before I was ever married or had my own children. He is a resource I always turn to when concerned with any aspect of marriage, parenting or family matters. Many years ago, I purchased Bringing Up Boys. I had two of my own and one step-son at the time. I now have three of my own, and my step-son is grown and on his own. I loved the book and the insight into the world of boys. When I was offered the opportunity to review Bringing Up Girls, I couldn't pass it up. Out of the five children I am raising, I've been blessed with one girl. In the sea of testosterone we live in, I wondered if I could successfully bring her up. In Bringing Up Girls, Dr. Dobson addresses how to raise a lady, how to protect her from the men and the influences of this world, how to teach her to respect herself and what true beauty is. His advice is sound and biblical, and it is something I will apply every day as I teach Hannah how to become a woman of God. I appreciate that Dr. Dobson includes multiple chapters that discuss the importance of a father in a girl's life. Mothers are important in teaching a girl how to become a woman, but daddies are important in teaching a girl how a man should treat her when she becomes that woman. Fathers don't need to be absent to be "absent." Girls are protected when their daddy pays attention and provides the nurture and affection she needs, so I am grateful that this aspect is included in Dr. Dobson's book. Another aspect I love about Bringing Up Girls is the fact that Dr. Dobson uses interviews and articles and material from other resources. He doesn't just write the book himself; he includes the advice of others to reinforce what he advises. I love it when an author can recommend other resources, knowing that one person doesn't have all the answers. I appreciate this. I highly recommend Bringing Up Girls for any parent who is leading a daughter into womanhood. It is a book that I will keep on my shelf until the day I can pass it on to one of my children as they raise their own daughters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I wanted to like this book more than I did. I'm not a huge Dobson fan, for various reasons, but he's at his best when he sticks to child develoment issues. That is, after all, where he is educated and has his professional experience. The book is the strongest when it is giving the physiological background for why girls behave the way they do at different ages, and some of the tips on how to help your daughter through difficult transitions are very useful. It is, in a way, written more for dads t I wanted to like this book more than I did. I'm not a huge Dobson fan, for various reasons, but he's at his best when he sticks to child develoment issues. That is, after all, where he is educated and has his professional experience. The book is the strongest when it is giving the physiological background for why girls behave the way they do at different ages, and some of the tips on how to help your daughter through difficult transitions are very useful. It is, in a way, written more for dads than moms, probably because dads may not realize their importance in the life of their daughters and may think they are only there to show their boys how to be manly. My complaints with the book are the endless amount of time he spends talking about the dangers of sexual immorality in girls. We get it. I also got it 4 chapters ago when you started discussing it, and you're still discussing it now. Chances are if a person picks up a book by Dobson they probably already lean to the right anyway. His points are absolutely valid, and I completely agree, but my time in reading is precious - move on. I also didn't like the verbatim transcripts of group discussions he's had with teenagers, because when you're reading it on a page rather than hearing the emotion in a discussion you lose the power of it, and the good doctor comes across as patronizing. That all sounds really picky - this book is worth reading as a reminder of the importance of being involved with our daughter's lives, but you probably could skim some of it when it gets repetitive.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Don

    girls outperform boys, liberal assault on decency of girls, fundamental am I lovely do you see me, give validation love and be loved healthy self-confidence, differ brains with 15% more blood flow, manner of women reflect foundation of country per Adams, do not tolerate men’s poor behavior, not popular with kids, thanks for loving and being there, divorce results in 4 years less, never make fun of, purity ball, tragic of beauty is not taken seriously and core is lack of dignity, porn not possibl girls outperform boys, liberal assault on decency of girls, fundamental am I lovely do you see me, give validation love and be loved healthy self-confidence, differ brains with 15% more blood flow, manner of women reflect foundation of country per Adams, do not tolerate men’s poor behavior, not popular with kids, thanks for loving and being there, divorce results in 4 years less, never make fun of, purity ball, tragic of beauty is not taken seriously and core is lack of dignity, porn not possible with love, boy teams build competition and solidarity w/o girls, daycare data supports less beneficial even detrimental before 4.5 and definitely not before 3, children as creatures of habit early on, strong willed children teach foolishness vs goodness to verify security with limits, reign in strong will define expectations accidents vs acknowledge willful forgiveness, love and affection influence, 60’s and 70’s as politically correct very poor and like Hitler pursued youth as it belongs to us, chastity is being truly in control of self, NIH stats more promiscuous has more problems more psychological issues, more happy vs depressed, 3xlikely to be depressed if sexually active including suicide boys8x, piercings as inward cry for help, play with fire will burn, gems given for each step leading to marriage, moral relativism as breakdown.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Bringing Up Girls by Dr. James C. Dobson I wish this book had been written decades ago with my oldest daughter. Since then, I have had four more daughters.Recently, I have become a single mom, just divorced, and it scares the heck outta me that my girls have lost their father figure. Bringing Up Girls has many chapters about the father and daughter relationship such as discussing the importance of why dads matter in their daughters life. With my recent divorce it has frightened me that my girls Bringing Up Girls by Dr. James C. Dobson I wish this book had been written decades ago with my oldest daughter. Since then, I have had four more daughters.Recently, I have become a single mom, just divorced, and it scares the heck outta me that my girls have lost their father figure. Bringing Up Girls has many chapters about the father and daughter relationship such as discussing the importance of why dads matter in their daughters life. With my recent divorce it has frightened me that my girls no longer have a good male role model. Yes, mom's do matter--and I must admit that I feel the burden of being the best mom in the world because of their father's shortcomings. Recommendation: I highly recommend Bringing Up Girls by Dr. James C. Dobson for counselors, fathers, mothers and grandparents. If you are going to read one book this year, give a book this year as a gift, or in need an idea for a subject in a class, use this book. It will open your eyes very deeply by sharing how relationships between mother and daughter, father and daughter is vital for your daughters growth into adulthood. Thanks to Tyndale House Publishers for providing this book for free.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tima

    The premise for this book is explained in the title. It's a book about raising your daughter in a changing world. The world around us is becoming more addicting and dangerous for our daughters and this book is supposed to show us how to navigate through this. Let me start off by saying that I'm a fan of Dr. Dobson and enjoyed his book Bringing Up Boys. This book, however, is incredibly long and filled with facts and data about our society and its depravity. Some of the information seems pretty da The premise for this book is explained in the title. It's a book about raising your daughter in a changing world. The world around us is becoming more addicting and dangerous for our daughters and this book is supposed to show us how to navigate through this. Let me start off by saying that I'm a fan of Dr. Dobson and enjoyed his book Bringing Up Boys. This book, however, is incredibly long and filled with facts and data about our society and its depravity. Some of the information seems pretty dated even though the copyright in my book says 2010. This book just couldn't hold my attention. I don't think a review should be written unless the book is read so I plowed through. It was very tedious reading for me. It was heavily slanted in favor of the dad as far as instruction goes. As a mother I felt I was reading a book meant for my husband. There just didn't seem to be anything that I could walk away with and use. It was mostly scaring me about how bad our world was and how easily my daughter could be harmed and damaged for life. I received this book free of charge Tyndale from in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    An excellent resource - long awaited after his book "Bringing Up Boys." As expected, Dr. James Dobson discusses the parenting of girls from a strong Christian perspective. He discusses both the physical changes found in raising a daughter as well as the psychological changes (sometimes much like land mines) one must traverse. This book delves even into how best to confront the "mean girl" situations that inevitably arise. Further, he emphasizes the importance of the father-daughter relationship An excellent resource - long awaited after his book "Bringing Up Boys." As expected, Dr. James Dobson discusses the parenting of girls from a strong Christian perspective. He discusses both the physical changes found in raising a daughter as well as the psychological changes (sometimes much like land mines) one must traverse. This book delves even into how best to confront the "mean girl" situations that inevitably arise. Further, he emphasizes the importance of the father-daughter relationship in the equation. A book of wisdom for the parents of girls.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book was life-changing for me. I felt free to be a female after I read this. Everything in this book is *true* and I always knew it but fought it off (for various reasons having to do with my upbringing)and it was so freeing to hear, from a Christian Psychologist, that who I am is the way God made me and it's *good*, and should be embraced. This book will be "required reading" for any man who wants to marry me (To ensure he understands and treats me, as well as our future daughter(s) right This book was life-changing for me. I felt free to be a female after I read this. Everything in this book is *true* and I always knew it but fought it off (for various reasons having to do with my upbringing)and it was so freeing to hear, from a Christian Psychologist, that who I am is the way God made me and it's *good*, and should be embraced. This book will be "required reading" for any man who wants to marry me (To ensure he understands and treats me, as well as our future daughter(s) right)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

    I Loved the book!!!! I can't believe the low ratings on this excellent book! If you are a Christian parent trying to raise your kids with Christian values then you'd definitely want to grab a cup of coffee and enjoy reading it! We try to raise our daughter from a Christian perspective and this book is a must read full of information and practical ideas for the Christian parents. I read it twice already to refresh my memory and our girl is only 9 still :) We have Dr. James Dobson's other book "Br I Loved the book!!!! I can't believe the low ratings on this excellent book! If you are a Christian parent trying to raise your kids with Christian values then you'd definitely want to grab a cup of coffee and enjoy reading it! We try to raise our daughter from a Christian perspective and this book is a must read full of information and practical ideas for the Christian parents. I read it twice already to refresh my memory and our girl is only 9 still :) We have Dr. James Dobson's other book "Bringing Up Boys" as well and it is an excellent read. We can't say enough about both books!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen Robinson

    Anti liberal, anti feminist, and anti Girl Scout. Anti Girl Scout and harps on the values of the Republican Party. There are good, God loving parents on the liberal side as well who believe in social justice which is more inline with Christ than judgments in this book. I would recommend this book to only Republican bible thumpers. Liberal Christians will leave it with hurt feelings.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keri

    I wish, wish, wish that I loved this...... but I hate it. I'm half way through and have to give myself a pep talk each time before I pick it up. I'm going to try .... I'm going to be open minded .... bla bla bla 7-26-2011 Still hating this~ 10-18-12 To be truthful, I never finished. I was only half-way through when we moved and I have thankfully never found it. Done and Done.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maisie

    I've only read the first chapter, but I've put it down because it's full of emotionally charged words that is intended to scare more than educate. I'd prefer a rewrite of this book that is more factual than emotional, because I do think there is good information there that's buried and somewhat exaggerated.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Perhaps I'm just over Dobson's writing style, but the the transcripts of radio interviews and quotes from other books are way overdone. There's actually little practical advice in this book and as it becomes a collection of everything else that's already been written about "raunch" culture and protecting our children from it. I was pretty much just bored the whole way through and skimmed a lot.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Practical advice, touching stories. Nothing shocking or new. Still a good read an one any parent to a 8+ year old girl should read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deon

    Practical advice, lots of positive suggestions, lots of statistics.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    This review will appear in the Journal for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood. James Dobson’s Bringing Up Boys, published in 2001 by Tyndale House, proved to be so informative and helpful to parents in the raising of their sons, that many fathers and mothers of daughters wondered when the companion volume on raising girls would be published. Ten years later, Dobson finished Bringing up Girls, and it will no doubt prove to be beneficial to all who read it. Dobson, the founder and president emeritus of This review will appear in the Journal for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood. James Dobson’s Bringing Up Boys, published in 2001 by Tyndale House, proved to be so informative and helpful to parents in the raising of their sons, that many fathers and mothers of daughters wondered when the companion volume on raising girls would be published. Ten years later, Dobson finished Bringing up Girls, and it will no doubt prove to be beneficial to all who read it. Dobson, the founder and president emeritus of Focus on the Family, a licensed psychologist and marriage, family, and child counselor, as well as a husband and father to a son and daughter, brings a wealth of trusted experience to his writing. Christians have long looked to Dr. Dobson for counsel in the raising of children, and there has arguably not been a more influential voice in parenting and marriage issues over the last century. Bringing Up Girls is borne out of a critical concern for the well-being of girls and young women in a culture that is simultaneously over-sexualized and confused over all issues related to gender and gender roles. There are so many competing voices for the hearts and minds of young women, so many mixed messages being sent to young men regarding the place of those same young women in society, and most tragically, so little godly sense exercised in parenting, that today, as perhaps never before, a clear voice of authoritative biblical wisdom is needed. Dobson begins his book by explaining, in the first two chapters, why he possesses this sense of urgency in writing to parents of girls. Young women are in peril. The ambient culture wants to make girls into sex objects, and it targets them when they are young and most vulnerable. Girls are different than boys. Femininity is different than masculinity. That might seem obvious and attractive to some, but to many in our society, those differences are unwanted and are to be negated through strong social engineering. In chapters three through six, Dobson explores the differences between girls and boys and argues persuasively that those differences are there by design. Bringing his clinical training and experience to bear, Dobson explains that girls are fundamentally different than boys, and those differences are essentially due to nature, not nurture. Girls have different biochemistry, physiology, and neurology. They are more emotional and nurturing. They mature differently and earlier than boys. They are programmed with different social needs and concerns. And though our culture desperately depends upon those differences, for the most part it does not respect or appreciate them. In fact, our culture is antagonistic toward them. Therefore, intentional parenting is needed to produce a safe environment where femininity and womanhood can be cultivated and trained. Chapters seven through eleven focus on the fundamental role that both mothers and fathers must play in raising girls. For example, mothers need to stay in touch emotionally with their girls. That relationship must be cultivated from birth and it is to continue throughout adolescence. In fact, Dobson is convinced that all of a girl’s childhood is a critical period in her relationship with her mother. Yet he cautions that girls need their mothers to be mothers first, and best-friends later. Fathers are equally important, though their role is different. Through formal study, panel discussion, and anecdote, Dobson makes the case that girls need their fathers. They need an emotional and appropriate physical connection with their fathers, particularly during their awkward teen years. Young girls need the security of knowing that their father, the man in their life, loves them unconditionally, that they are protected and provided for by that same man. Their maturity, and psychological and emotional health depends upon it. For those fathers who struggle in knowing how to do so, Dobson has suggestions for cultivating the relationship that range from the simple (e.g., intentional times of conversation) to the elaborate (e.g., a father-daughter purity ball). Chapters twelve through fourteen focus on cultural exegesis. Why is it that girls are the way that they are and yet our culture both feeds some legitimate desires (Dobson devotes all of chapter 12 to the “princess” movement) and destructively fights against others (chapter 14 describes the cultural currents that seek to pull girls toward sexual immorality)? Chapter 15 outlines the inevitable consequences of a sexual promiscuous lifestyle. The effects of the “hookup” culture are physical, relational, and emotional. But he happily reports in chapter 16 that a growing number of young women are resisting the tides of the culture and are practicing sexual abstinence until marriage. Dr. Dobson provides some practical advice in chapters 16 and 17 to parents who seek to protect their children and teach them to value and cherish their sexuality. Chapters 18-21 cover an assortment of issues related to female physiology and biochemistry (18), female bullying and “relational aggression” (19), puberty (20), and protecting your children in our connected age from the dangers presented by invasive technology (21). In chapter 22, Dobson brings the book to a close by calling parents to raise their girls in the fear of the Lord, pointing them to Jesus Christ. Bringing Up Girls is a strong book full of easy-to-understand explanations and practical advice. The strengths are numerous. Here are a representative few: Bringing Up Girls, though dealing with difficult issues is remarkably easy to read. Dobson illustrates his points throughout with panel discussion transcripts and anecdotes from his personal experiences in raising his daughter. Dr. Dobson writes in much the same style in which he speaks. Those who have listened to Dobson over the years will at times hear his voice speaking the words of advice, concern, and compassion as the pages are read. The book is clearly a labor of love and represents, in all earnestness, Dobson at his best. Dobson’s clarion call to fathers to be intentionally involved in the lives of their daughters is compelling and convicting. As the father of a teenage daughter myself, I was confronted at numerous points and then challenged with the importance of my role in her life. He also raises the issue of the importance of mothers being at home with their children. Although he is not as confrontational as he could, he outlines the issue well and asks mothers in two-career families to consider the wellbeing of their daughters as they make their vocational choices. Dobson’s citations of sociological and physiological research is impressive. His explanations are clear. One is left with the inescapable conclusion that there is a difference between boys and girls and it is that way by design. Readers are also left with an understanding of their daughter’s physiology, neurology, and emotional makeup that will go a long way toward explaining her needs. Though never excusing certain behaviors, such knowledge will enable parents to understand and more effectively deal with certain issues as physiological changes occur. Two areas of concern, one small, the other more significant: At times, Dobson runs into the same confusion regarding femininity and gender roles that is manifest in the culture. It is apparent that he is trying to walk a fine line between the strength of women on the one side and their femininity on the other. At one point he defends the strength of his feminine grandmother by recalling that she co-pastored a church with his grandfather and she was an excellent preacher. I’m not sure that appealing to an occasion where a woman does what is forbidden by Scripture is testimony to legitimate strength. Admittedly, it is a difficult line to walk when you are trying to speak against a culture that wants to treat women as sexual objects while also affirming the differences between men and women that the feminist movement despises. Scripture alone is able to guide one along this line, celebrating the differences between men and women that are designed by our wise and loving Creator while upholding the precious dignity of women as image-bearers and the unique and special creations of God. Which brings me to my largest concern: There is virtually no Bible and even less gospel in this book. Surely the gospel has incredible implications for how we parent our girls! And I am speaking of more than a general “raise your children in the fear and admonition of the Lord” instruction. If Jesus came to save sinners (including mothers, fathers, young women, and little girls) and that salvation is holistic in the manner and depth that Scripture reveals, then the gospel has to uniquely guide our aspirations, philosophies, techniques, and prayers for our daughters as females and our sons as males. It is not until the last chapter that Dobson turns to Scripture for divine revelation on the roles and responsibilities of parents. And when he does so, it reads more like an obligatory add-on, rather than an authoritative appeal to the Word of God to give definition, explanation, and instruction to femininity, adolescence, and parenting. Why not begin with a brief biblical study on femininity and masculinity? Why no reference or appeal to the verses or passages that speak specifically to women and womanhood? But there were plenty of references to science, psychological studies, opinion polls, and anecdotal evidence. Dr. Dobson’s appeals to behavioral science, psychology, and physiology are impressive. And it is clear to me that Dobson is convinced that men and women, girls and boys, are unique and different because God designed them to be so. With that presupposition in mind the data makes perfect sense and is helpful. Why not make that presupposition explicit by rightly grounding the theology, philosophy, goals, and manner of parenting girls in the Bible? But in the absence of that presupposition, one will inevitably conclude that the source of authority and insight for parenting lies in the behavioral sciences. Really, apart from the last chapter and the unwritten presuppositions that ground the entire worldview of the volume, there is nothing distinctly Christian about the book. I think that Dobson recognizes the priority and sufficiency of Scripture, but it is not clear from the book structure that this is the case. But Dr. Dobson has earned our trust and we know of his commitment to Christ. His voice is no longer heard by as many parents as it was during the seventies and eighties when he called parents to love their children enough to “dare to discipline.” More is the pity. One look around society and even the church suggests that most parents are not suffering from too much good advice and godly instruction. If anything, the stakes for our children are higher now and the world that much more dangerous. For these reasons and more, Bringing up Girls is a book well worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Danielle DeVane Wells

    This was a good, general book about how to raise girls in a Christian home and the information that parents would need to do so. I have nothing negative to say about this book. It was not super "heavy"; it was easily readable. It brought up lots of good topics to do further research on. Each chapter was about a specific topic about girls. I gave it 4 stars because at the end of each chapter, I was wanting more. proof/evidence for certain claims, more information on the topic, more recommend This was a good, general book about how to raise girls in a Christian home and the information that parents would need to do so. I have nothing negative to say about this book. It was not super "heavy"; it was easily readable. It brought up lots of good topics to do further research on. Each chapter was about a specific topic about girls. I gave it 4 stars because at the end of each chapter, I was wanting more. proof/evidence for certain claims, more information on the topic, more recommendations to varied, other books (as the author stated in the book, he didn't feel like he was qualified to talk about a certain subjects, so he included other's quotes, books, etc.). IT was a comprehensive look at girls altogether and it's a good starting place for a parent who has not read anything about girls before. But if a book can't contain all the information you need to understand a subject, point us to more books that can! Because people (and girls) are so complicated and because raising children (in an intelligent, comprehensive, open-minded way) requires so much knowledge on so many subjects, I feel like no one book would be appropriate or ever enough. Some of the topics brought up in the book: mother-daughter relationship, father-daughter relationship, puberty and adolescence, hormones and emotions, beauty obsession, relationships between female friends, etc. All of these topics need a whole book devoted to them if you're going to properly and wholly understand how to deal with those things.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stacy M. Patton

    Every parent who has a girl should read this book! My advice is this: read this book when your daughter is young and then read it again when she is a preteen. This book covers so much and there is so much research and real life examples to back up the points he makes on raising girls (especially in our sexualized society). This book will help you to better understand your daughter and see that she is wired a certain way. It will also cover things like teen pressures and how to combat them. I cou Every parent who has a girl should read this book! My advice is this: read this book when your daughter is young and then read it again when she is a preteen. This book covers so much and there is so much research and real life examples to back up the points he makes on raising girls (especially in our sexualized society). This book will help you to better understand your daughter and see that she is wired a certain way. It will also cover things like teen pressures and how to combat them. I could write many paragraphs on why you should read this book and how it will benefit your daughter, but trust me and just read this book instead!

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