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Marrying vivid eyewitness storytelling with concrete analysis, Jeffrey Sachs provides a conceptual map of the world economy and the different categories into which countries fall, explaining why wealth and poverty have diverged and evolved as they have and why the poorest nations have been so markedly unable to escape the cruel vortex of poverty. Sachs plunges into the mes Marrying vivid eyewitness storytelling with concrete analysis, Jeffrey Sachs provides a conceptual map of the world economy and the different categories into which countries fall, explaining why wealth and poverty have diverged and evolved as they have and why the poorest nations have been so markedly unable to escape the cruel vortex of poverty. Sachs plunges into the messy realities of economies, leading his readers through his work in Bolivia, Poland, Russia, India, China, and Africa, and concludes with an integrated set of solutions to the tangled economic, political, environmental, and social issues that most frequently hold societies back.


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Marrying vivid eyewitness storytelling with concrete analysis, Jeffrey Sachs provides a conceptual map of the world economy and the different categories into which countries fall, explaining why wealth and poverty have diverged and evolved as they have and why the poorest nations have been so markedly unable to escape the cruel vortex of poverty. Sachs plunges into the mes Marrying vivid eyewitness storytelling with concrete analysis, Jeffrey Sachs provides a conceptual map of the world economy and the different categories into which countries fall, explaining why wealth and poverty have diverged and evolved as they have and why the poorest nations have been so markedly unable to escape the cruel vortex of poverty. Sachs plunges into the messy realities of economies, leading his readers through his work in Bolivia, Poland, Russia, India, China, and Africa, and concludes with an integrated set of solutions to the tangled economic, political, environmental, and social issues that most frequently hold societies back.

30 review for The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time

  1. 4 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

    Towards the End of Poverty: A Manifesto The difference between a solid policy prescription book and an evocative manifesto is hard to make out if it is an economist writing it. I should have known which side this would fall on once I saw that the introduction was by Bono, but I let the forceful and articulate Bono force me into buying this one. In the store, Bono’s righteous anger was infectious and the book could not be put down. It sounded like a moral obligation: Fifteen thousand people dyin Towards the End of Poverty: A Manifesto The difference between a solid policy prescription book and an evocative manifesto is hard to make out if it is an economist writing it. I should have known which side this would fall on once I saw that the introduction was by Bono, but I let the forceful and articulate Bono force me into buying this one. In the store, Bono’s righteous anger was infectious and the book could not be put down. It sounded like a moral obligation: Fifteen thousand people dying needlessly every day from AIDS, TB, and malaria. Mothers, fathers, teachers, farmers, nurses, mechanics, children. This is Africa's crisis. That it's not on the nightly news, that we do not treat this as an emergency—that's our crisis. Sachs has often come into some criticism for advocating a too-simple model. But, perhaps the point is that one has to take his prescriptions as those of a reformist, of an evangelist, of one who is willing to put his reputation on the line to get the ball rolling. He is okay to work out the details later. His prime interest is to convince the world that progress in the fight against poverty is possible, and that depends on giving them a believable model, a get-go plan. The model he presents is the Ladder of Development. This is the easy and feel-good model, the one for the headlines. The more realistic prescription is hidden inside. It is what he calls ‘Clinical Economics’. This review wont be covering that. Another interesting part of the book is Sachs’ analysis of China. It is an insightful take on why socialism failed in Russia but flourished in China. It is worth a read, but again won’t be covered in this review since it will take away from the forcefulness of the main thrust. The reviewer is determined to be a disciple of Sachs in this respect. In the simple model, Sachs tells us that there exists a Ladder of Development. It is made of many successive rungs that have to be climbed to reach where the developed world currently is. The Ladder is not a normal ladder, the rungs are not equally spaced - they get closer together as you climb higher. So that it gets easier and easier to climb the higher you are. This is illustrated by countries who were poor only a few decades ago but had so called ‘economic miracles’. To Sachs, there was nothing miraculous about it, it was all about getting high enough in the ladder for the growth to be self-sustaining. The very hardest part of economic development, according to Sachs, is getting the first foothold on this Ladder. This is so because, true to its peculiar nature, the lowest rung of the Ladder is very high off the ground. Most of the poor countries cannot easily reach there. If only they could, they would then be climbing as if they were born ladder-climbers, Sachs is sure. Economic development works. It can be successful. It tends to build on itself. But it must get started. This is where the ones on top of the Ladder has to step in. This is where the role of aid, the crux of Sachs’ advocacy, becomes crucial. If the developed nations could just pull these countries on to the First Rung and perhaps even hold their hand for the next few rungs, we could soon be at The End of Poverty. So, the rich countries should stop obsessing over trivialities (too much economic thinking, Sachs says, has been directed at the wrong question—how to make the poor countries into textbook models of good governance or efficient market economies) and focus on making sure that every country is safely on the Ladder. All the squabbling and fighting happens when they can’t get on it and focus all their abundant energies towards the exciting adventure of climbing it. Once they are on that task, other peripheral aspects of development would follow naturally. So stop breaking your head over it and get on the real task - this is Sachs radioing the world, loud and clear. Sachs sees the Ladder and knows that a better world is there for the taking. He sees that much of the world is focused on comparatively trivial things when they could be saving lives and ending misery. That is why Sachs is angry. And this book is the result. It leaves little doubt about the duty of this generation. Sachs is supposed to be most important economist of this generation, and based on his results, he might indeed be. There is definitely no doubt that he is the loudest (especially with Bono for company). You can question his approach, but not his passion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Sullivan

    You, being a smart person who is up on contemporary debates in economics and development and/or are a reader of Vanity Fair, probably already know all about Sachs and this book. Sachs made his name giving “shock therapy” to various third world economies. He recommended they jack up interest rates, and pushed them towards neo-liberal free market structures. His career hit a bit of a bad patch when he was associated with the economic meltdown of the former Soviet Socialist Republic. This book is hi You, being a smart person who is up on contemporary debates in economics and development and/or are a reader of Vanity Fair, probably already know all about Sachs and this book. Sachs made his name giving “shock therapy” to various third world economies. He recommended they jack up interest rates, and pushed them towards neo-liberal free market structures. His career hit a bit of a bad patch when he was associated with the economic meltdown of the former Soviet Socialist Republic. This book is his recommendations for development in Africa. Sach’s ideas at base a pretty simple - Sub Saharan Africa needs lots and lots more aid. This aid should be put to use curing easily defeatable diseases and establishing local agrarian and eventually manufacturing economies, and right wing type who say that more aid won’t fix the problem are wrong. That’s about it. I think Sach’s has this all about half right. More aid is a good idea, but alone, and in the style he suggests, I doubt it will lead to an end to poverty. Paul Collier’s more nuanced book The Bottom Billion, which I just finished, and will review soon, gives a better battle plan for dealing with seriously fucked countries. Sach’s plan is a little too throw-money-at-the-problem for me. Still, this book is worth a read. If you’re going to talk about world poverty now a days (and I tend to talk about world poverty a lot), you going to have to know what Sach is up to. He is by far the biggest name in the field. He may not always be right, but he’s a player that you need to know about.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    I expected to give this book one star, but I could get behind enough of Sachs' ideas to give it two. Sachs opposes IMF/WB austerity measures to promote development, and defends health care, education, and other services as public goods. He advocates taxing the rich and getting the world's wealthiest people to invest their money in the world's poorest people. He opposes Bush's excessive military spending because he thinks US and global security are more effectively guaranteed by cutting down glob I expected to give this book one star, but I could get behind enough of Sachs' ideas to give it two. Sachs opposes IMF/WB austerity measures to promote development, and defends health care, education, and other services as public goods. He advocates taxing the rich and getting the world's wealthiest people to invest their money in the world's poorest people. He opposes Bush's excessive military spending because he thinks US and global security are more effectively guaranteed by cutting down global poverty. He emphasizes the need to understand and act on the vast range of factors that might contribute to poverty in specific countries and regions. But predictably, Sachs, guided by Enlightenment and Adam Smith-type rationalism and market logic, is misguided on the basic point of what constitute "wealth," "poverty," and "development" (e.g., for him, private property is a precondition for ending poverty and inequality). He also drastically downplays colonialism's role in global inequality, posing it as purely a matter of economic relations. Overall, there are some decent ideas here, but Sachs isn't changing the terms of the development debate.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Poor Jeffrey Sachs. He reminds me of the autistic kid in elementary school who isn't sure why no one likes reading the marginalia of comic books as much as he does. After all, the other kids like Spiderman too. So why doesn't everyone else want to do the cross-referencing (I may have been awfully close to being that kid)? Jeffrey Sachs' basic perspective is that all we have to do to solve poverty is pump aid money in and engage in debt relief. Let's ignore, for a moment, the fact that he was larg Poor Jeffrey Sachs. He reminds me of the autistic kid in elementary school who isn't sure why no one likes reading the marginalia of comic books as much as he does. After all, the other kids like Spiderman too. So why doesn't everyone else want to do the cross-referencing (I may have been awfully close to being that kid)? Jeffrey Sachs' basic perspective is that all we have to do to solve poverty is pump aid money in and engage in debt relief. Let's ignore, for a moment, the fact that he was largely responsible (intellectually, and to a certain extent in practice) for disastrous shock programs in Eastern Europe that threw millions into sudden poverty, provided a fertile ground for the rise of crony capitalists of the worst order, and largely fueled the rise of neo-fascism, but let's look at his starry-eyed worldview, a world in which if enough nice people do nice things, everything will be nicer. But he ignores everything that would prevent this from happening, because he's, I'm guessing a very personable head-in-the-clouds idealist. He's right to criticize "cultural" explanations of poverty, and right to criticize the IMF and World Bank for keeping countries poor. And yet he ignores the brutal realities of extractive economies, the ways in which foreign capital colludes with militaries and gleefully ignores local laws, and the ways in which the aid machine pats donors' backs without making a real difference.

  5. 4 out of 5

    simon aloyts

    What do Bono, and countless other celebrities have in common with the author? A: They’ve always wanted to be celebrities. What is different? A: The celebs actually think that the world can be rid of poverty and misery and vice. Are you honestly going to tell me that one of the world’s most influential economists ACTUALLY believes that poverty can be banished or even meaningfully reduced? Not a chance. Not with Africa’s population growth rate. Sachs is selling panic again to promote himself and i What do Bono, and countless other celebrities have in common with the author? A: They’ve always wanted to be celebrities. What is different? A: The celebs actually think that the world can be rid of poverty and misery and vice. Are you honestly going to tell me that one of the world’s most influential economists ACTUALLY believes that poverty can be banished or even meaningfully reduced? Not a chance. Not with Africa’s population growth rate. Sachs is selling panic again to promote himself and it’s really beginning to grate my nerves. The entire book is a formula to get people “involved” i.e.: spending money a happy percentage of which Sachs and others like him will collect. The truth is that despite all the self-important boo-hooing about how a child dies every 3 seconds in Africa, no one ever mentions that 12 were just born and 8 survived which is why the continent has a growth rate of 3% and will harbor 1.2 billion starving souls in next 23 years. People who, when China and India become as rich as Japan, will be happy to stitch together our soccer balls.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A well written book. In my opinion it can not be read without also reading William Easterly's book "The Quest For Growth." The two scholors are at war with each other. Their debate is all the more interesting when you read the back and forth op-ed pieces they have written in the Washington Post. I tend to agree with Easterly: Sachs means well, but he is very full of himself. His book is more a tribute to what he can do, and other economists can't than a good debate on the issues. Flying Bono aro A well written book. In my opinion it can not be read without also reading William Easterly's book "The Quest For Growth." The two scholors are at war with each other. Their debate is all the more interesting when you read the back and forth op-ed pieces they have written in the Washington Post. I tend to agree with Easterly: Sachs means well, but he is very full of himself. His book is more a tribute to what he can do, and other economists can't than a good debate on the issues. Flying Bono around makes for nice PR but it doesn't address the serious economic issues/problems of international growth. Easterly takes a (in my opinion) less rigorous and more anecdotal approach, call it the softer side, to growth. He offers answers which everyone wants to hear, but which don't always bear fruit when fully analyzed. Unfortunately, it is this fluffy side of growth that politicians like to promote. They promote it because its easy, because people like to think they are doing something, even if all they are doing is throwing money into a black whole. Anyhow, this book makes for good reading, and I recommend it to everyone interested in economic growth, the hot topic of macroeconomic research these days. Just don't read it in isolation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership

    One of Cambridge Sustainability's Top 50 Books for Sustainability, as voted for by our alumni network of over 3,000 senior leaders from around the world. To find out more, click here. The End of Poverty argues that extreme poverty, defined by the World Bank as having an income of less than $1 a day, is 'the poverty that kills'. However, it is almost entirely preventable and solvable (as has been shown in developed countries and many developing countries) through the provision of basic services in One of Cambridge Sustainability's Top 50 Books for Sustainability, as voted for by our alumni network of over 3,000 senior leaders from around the world. To find out more, click here. The End of Poverty argues that extreme poverty, defined by the World Bank as having an income of less than $1 a day, is 'the poverty that kills'. However, it is almost entirely preventable and solvable (as has been shown in developed countries and many developing countries) through the provision of basic services in water, sanitation, healthcare and food. Hence, the end of poverty is not only possible, but also morally imperative. Sachs challenges the wholly pessimistic view of poverty, pointing out that five-sixths of the world have excaped extreme poverty due to the scientific and industrial revolution, which has raised living standards and life expectancy. This shows that development does work, and that the remaining one billion poor are not inevitably condemned to remain destitute.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ushan

    Sachs visited Malawi a few times in the 2000s, and met the country's vice-president, "a remarkably fine individual, a dignified, eloquent, a popular figure in what is against all odds a multiparty democracy." He "came to know Malawi relatively well" and saw people dying of AIDS, depleted soil, no medicines in the hospital, children stunted from malnutrition. Paul Theroux visited the country in 2001; unlike Sachs, he speaks Chichewa, the Bantu language widely spoken in Malawi, having worked in wh Sachs visited Malawi a few times in the 2000s, and met the country's vice-president, "a remarkably fine individual, a dignified, eloquent, a popular figure in what is against all odds a multiparty democracy." He "came to know Malawi relatively well" and saw people dying of AIDS, depleted soil, no medicines in the hospital, children stunted from malnutrition. Paul Theroux visited the country in 2001; unlike Sachs, he speaks Chichewa, the Bantu language widely spoken in Malawi, having worked in what was then called Nyasaland in the 1960s. He read that "on the day the minister of finance announces his financial austerity plan, it is revealed that thirty-eight Mercedes Benzes have just been ordered from Germany," saw ruins of the shops formerly owned by the Indians expelled by dictator Hastings Banda, heard a British nurse complain that African doctors wouldn't work for what she and her doctor husband are paid, and saw his own novel Jungle Lovers, which is set in Malawi, on the index of prohibited books, alongside works by Orwell, Nabokov and Rushdie. Theroux is a novelist, and Sachs is an economist; a novelist would say that malnourished children by themselves do not make a good story, but malnourished children juxtaposed with the ban on Nabokov do; an economist would say that the index of prohibited books is irrelevant to the problem of soil depletion. Yet it seems to me that Sachs came to know Malawi not at all compared to Theroux. How well did Sachs come to know the other countries he advised on economic reform, most famously Russia?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    Another book written by a rich caucasian on how to solve "Third World" problems. Sachs floats a lot of "economic theories" and Bono throws in his bit as well. Understandably so, they've never walked a mile in a poor person's shoes. Some things are just as nature intended. We cannot all be wealthy CEOs, who'll do the ground work?. Intervention does more harm than good, most of the time. Some relief schemes are built on greed and filth. Just look at USaid!! Closer to home, look at the giant retail Another book written by a rich caucasian on how to solve "Third World" problems. Sachs floats a lot of "economic theories" and Bono throws in his bit as well. Understandably so, they've never walked a mile in a poor person's shoes. Some things are just as nature intended. We cannot all be wealthy CEOs, who'll do the ground work?. Intervention does more harm than good, most of the time. Some relief schemes are built on greed and filth. Just look at USaid!! Closer to home, look at the giant retailers!!! We need to understand how each country is built first before we offer "tried and tested" solutions. Two industries keep a country going: farming and manufacturing. Stop outsourcing the manufacturing to the Chinese. Build factories here at home. Empower the citizens through transfer of skills!!! Enough said. Loathed the book! Sachs is an imperialist and snotty!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Arno Mosikyan

    some excerpts "Equality is a very big idea, connected to freedom, but an idea that doesn’t come for free. If we’re serious, we have to be prepared to pay the price. Some people will say we can’t afford to do it …. I disagree. I think we can’t afford not to do it. When the preconditions of basic infrastructure (roads, power, and ports) and human capital (health and education) are in place, markets are powerful engines of development. Without those preconditions, markets can cruelly bypass large pa some excerpts "Equality is a very big idea, connected to freedom, but an idea that doesn’t come for free. If we’re serious, we have to be prepared to pay the price. Some people will say we can’t afford to do it …. I disagree. I think we can’t afford not to do it. When the preconditions of basic infrastructure (roads, power, and ports) and human capital (health and education) are in place, markets are powerful engines of development. Without those preconditions, markets can cruelly bypass large parts of the world, leaving them impoverished and suffering without respite. One of the ironies of the recent success of India and China is the fear that has engulfed the United States that success in these two countries comes at the expense of the United States. These fears are fundamentally wrong and, even worse, dangerous. They are wrong because the world is not a zero-sum struggle in which one country’s gain is another’s loss, but is rather a positive-sum opportunity in which improving technologies and skills can raise living standards around the world. The greatest tragedy of our time is that one sixth of humanity is not even on the development ladder. The crucial puzzle for understanding today’s vast inequalities, therefore, is to understand why different regions of the world have grown at different rates during the period of modern economic growth. Technology has been the main force behind the long-term increases in income in the rich world, not exploitation of the poor. That news is very good indeed because it suggests that all of the world, including today’s laggard regions, has a reasonable hope of reaping the benefits of technological advance. Economic development is not a zero-sum game in which the winnings of some are inevitably mirróred by the losses of others. This game is one that everybody can win. First, British society was relatively open, with more scope for individual initiative and social mobility than most other societies of the world. Britain’s advantages, in summary, were marked by a combination of social, political, and geographical factors. British society was relatively free and politically stable. Scientific thinking was dynamic. Geography enabled Britain to benefit from trade, productive agriculture, and energy resources in vast stocks of coal. Most important, modern economic growth was not only a question of “more” (output per person) but also “change.” The transition to modern economic growth involved urbanization, changing gender roles, increased social mobility, changing family structure, and increasing specialization. I believe that the single most important reason why prosperity spread, and why it continues to spread, is the transmission of technologies and the ideas underlying them. Economists call ideas nonrival in the sense that one person’s use of an idea does not diminish the ability of others to use it as well. This is why we can envision a world in which everybody achieves prosperity. Countries are often told that if their debts are cancelled, they will no longer be creditworthy. This argument is backward. If a country has too much debt, it cannot be creditworthy. Rational investors will not make new loans. If debt cancellation is warranted by financial realities, is negotiated in good faith, and the country pursues sound economic policies afterward, then debt cancellation raises creditworthiness rather than reduces it. At that point, George Soros helped me to meet a young Soviet reformer, Grigory Yavlinsky, who was a new economic adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev. In November 1991, Boris Yeltsin asked Yegor Gaidar, a leading young Russian economist, to create an economic team. Gaidar invited me and David Lipton to a dacha outside of Moscow to work with the new economic team in putting together a reform plan for Russia. One recalls Chinese Premier Chou En-lai’s quip when asked whether the French Revolution had been a success or failure: “It’s too soon to say.” In China, the European incursion was especially disastrous. Great Britain attacked China in 1839 to promote British narcotics trafficking, launching the first of the Opium Wars of 1839–42 to force China to open up to trade. Among other things, Britain insisted that China agree to the importation of opium that British commercial interests were producing and trading in India. British policy makers were interested in China’s vast market, including solving the conundrum of how to pay for Britain’s national craze: Chinese tea. The solution was ingenious and utterly destructive. Britain would sell opium to China and earn the wherewithal to purchase China’s tea. It is as if Colombia waged war with the United States today for the right to sell cocaine. Boring as it may seem, we need to fix the “plumbing” of international development assistance in order to be effective in helping the well-governed countries. Aid flows through certain pipes—bilateral donors, the World Bank, the regional development banks (such as the African Development Bank)—but these pipes are clogged or simply too narrow, not able to carry a sufficient flow of aid. Redeem the Role of the United States in the World The richest and most powerful country in the world, long the leader and inspiration in democratic ideals, has become the most feared and divisive country in recent years. The self-professed quest by the United States for unchallenged supremacy and freedom of action has been a disaster, and it poses one of the greatest risks to global stability. The lack of U.S. participation in multilateral initiatives has undermined global security and progress toward social justice and environmental protection. Its own interests have been undermined by this unilateral turn. Forged in the crucible of the Enlightenment, the United States can become a champion of Enlightened Globalization. Political action within the United States and from abroad will be needed to restore its role on the road toward global peace and justice. Rescue the IMF and the World Bank Our leading international financial institutions are needed to play a decisive role in ending global poverty. They have the experience and technical sophistication to play an important role. They have the internal motivation of a highly professional staff. Yet they have been badly used, indeed misused, as creditor-run agencies rather than international institutions representing all of their 182 member governments. It is time to restore the international role of these agencies so that they are no longer the handmaidens of creditor governments, but the champions of economic justice and enlightened globalization. Strengthen the United Nations It is no use blaming the UN for the missteps of recent years. We have gotten the UN that has been willed by the powerful countries of the world, especially the United States. Why are UN agencies less operational than they should be? Not because of UN bureaucracy, though that exists, but because the powerful countries are reluctant to cede more authority to international institutions, fearing reduction of their own freedom of maneuver. The UN specialized agencies have a core role to play in the end of poverty. It is time to empower the likes of the UN Children’s Fund, the World Health Organization, the Food and Agricultural Organization, and many others to do the job—on the ground, country by country—that they are uniquely qualified to lead, helping the poorest of the poor to use modern science and technology to overcome the trap of poverty. Harness Global Science Science has been the key to development from the very start of the industrial revolution, the fulcrum by which reason is translated into technologies of social advance. As Condorcet predicted, science has empowered technological advances in food production, health, environmental management, and countless other basic sectors of production and human need. Yet science tends to follow market forces as well as to lead them. It is not surprising, I have noted repeatedly, that the rich get richer in a continuing cycle of endogenous growth, whereas the poorest of the poor are often left outside of this virtuous circle. When their needs are specific—by virtue of particular diseases, or crops, or ecological conditions—their problems are bypassed by global science. Therefore, a special effort of world science, led by global scientific research centers of governments, academia, and industry, must commit specifically to addressing the unmet challenges of the poor. Public funding, private philanthropies, and not-for-profit foundations will have to back these commitments, precisely because market forces alone will not suffice. Promote Sustainable Development While targeted investments in health, education, and infrastructure can unlock the trap of extreme poverty, the continuing environmental degradation at local, regional, and planetary scales threatens the long-term sustainability of all our social gains. Ending extreme poverty can relieve many of the pressures on the environment. When impoverished households are more productive on their farms, they face less pressure to cut down neighboring forests in search of new farmland. When their children survive with high probability, they have less incentive to maintain very high fertility rates with the attendant downside of rapid population growth. Still, even as extreme poverty ends, the environmental degradation related to industrial pollution and the long-term climate change associated with massive use of fossil fuels will have to be addressed. There are ways to confront these environmental challenges without destroying prosperity (for example, by building smarter power plants that capture and dispose of their carbon emissions and by increasing use of renewable energy sources). As we invest in ending extreme poverty, we must face the ongoing challenge of investing in the global sustainability of the world’s ecosystems."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Doigt

    Oh Jeff...can I call you Jeff? No? Ok. Dr. Sachs, you're ideas are way too lofty and boring, but you're really enthusiastic about them so everyone likes you. I only think you're OK. What happens when all of Bono's money goes into the pockets of corrupt dictators? Will he be able to afford more sunglasses so he can continue to have pictures of himself taken with brown kids in the bright African sun? I think he will. Meanwhile, entrepreneurs in those bright African places will continue stay stagna Oh Jeff...can I call you Jeff? No? Ok. Dr. Sachs, you're ideas are way too lofty and boring, but you're really enthusiastic about them so everyone likes you. I only think you're OK. What happens when all of Bono's money goes into the pockets of corrupt dictators? Will he be able to afford more sunglasses so he can continue to have pictures of himself taken with brown kids in the bright African sun? I think he will. Meanwhile, entrepreneurs in those bright African places will continue stay stagnant and poor.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Uzair Ahmed

    CORRUPTION IS NOT THE CAUSE OF POVERTY IT'S THE UNFORTUNATE ORIGIN It greatly signifies poverty, a problem that must be handled with infallible plan, with efforts from everywhere around the world is must. Thanks to it's simple use of language, I was able to understand myriad basics and background details of economic development and governance in a respectable degree. But it almost felt like a guide book (like a youtube video tutorial hehe 😁) and the points it discussed were almost similar through CORRUPTION IS NOT THE CAUSE OF POVERTY IT'S THE UNFORTUNATE ORIGIN It greatly signifies poverty, a problem that must be handled with infallible plan, with efforts from everywhere around the world is must. Thanks to it's simple use of language, I was able to understand myriad basics and background details of economic development and governance in a respectable degree. But it almost felt like a guide book (like a youtube video tutorial hehe 😁) and the points it discussed were almost similar throughout the book (almost got bored at end and I skipped few end pages of book hehe 😅😁). At random occasions, I didn't felt persuaded to arguments and points. Persuasion department of writing was fine (if jeffery focused on it, quality of book would vastly increase, just saying hehe 😁🤗😉). But overall, a great book! Very Good, Jeffery Sachs! I enjoyed it very much! ☺️❤️

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brady

    As someone with a passion for helping the poor, I thought this book would be a worthwhile read. However, I walk away feeling like I listened to a broken record for the entire book. Sachs' main thesis in my opinion is that poor countries need a fresh start via debt cancellation, coupled with an injection of ODA provided by the world's rich countries. He illustrated this argument 500 times in a variety of ways. His style was too confrontational and "I know best" for my liking. After hearing "me", As someone with a passion for helping the poor, I thought this book would be a worthwhile read. However, I walk away feeling like I listened to a broken record for the entire book. Sachs' main thesis in my opinion is that poor countries need a fresh start via debt cancellation, coupled with an injection of ODA provided by the world's rich countries. He illustrated this argument 500 times in a variety of ways. His style was too confrontational and "I know best" for my liking. After hearing "me", "my", and "I" more times than I could count in the first half of the book, I was partially turned off. Not only that, but Sachs managed to condemn more groups and individuals than he praised. Throughout the book, he gave a black eye to America, Americans, President Reagan, President Bush, Christians and other religious folks, the rich, Republicans, neoconservatives, and more. I imagined him coming to my door, punching me in the face, and then asking for my tax and personal dollars like nothing even happened. My opinions of economists have not improved after reading Antifragile and Think Like a Freak. I sincerely wish the world met his challenge of giving 0.7% of GDP to see whether it would work or not. Economists can make predictions and give advice all they want, but life is not rational, predictable, or linear enough for them to work out a majority of the time. For a balanced perspective and a book that was critical of Sachs conclusions, try Why Nations Fail. I also found Poor Economics to be much more readable and interesting, with more behavioral economics tie-ins.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Johnson

    Generation X seems to have missed out on causes greater than ourselves. The Greatest Generation had World War II. The baby boomers had efforts to overcome racial discrimination and end the war in Vietnam. Gen X'ers have enjoyed economic prosperity and although there were events going on in the world where we should have stood up and rallied the nation around the need to do the right thing (ending genocide in Bosnia, Rwanda, and Darfur come to mind), we opted to continue the materialistic pursuit Generation X seems to have missed out on causes greater than ourselves. The Greatest Generation had World War II. The baby boomers had efforts to overcome racial discrimination and end the war in Vietnam. Gen X'ers have enjoyed economic prosperity and although there were events going on in the world where we should have stood up and rallied the nation around the need to do the right thing (ending genocide in Bosnia, Rwanda, and Darfur come to mind), we opted to continue the materialistic pursuits chronicled in the media during our formative years in the '80s and exemplified by the movie Wall Street ("Greed is good"). Sachs outlines a cause we can and should all support, namely, ending extreme poverty in the world within 30 years. As an econ major, I enjoyed reviewing the figures Sachs provided, but I know that certain sections of the book are dry reading for many. Regardless, the case is clearly made that as lofty as his stated goal may sound, it is more than possible. It is entirely realistic, but it will require that the US stand behind its commitments to the global community. If we simply allocate 0.7% of the world's GDP to a concerted effort to improve infrastructure, technology, and farming methods in Africa and Asia, extreme poverty will no longer exist on this planet. How do you rally the nations of the world around this cause? One convert at a time. And it begins by reading this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    H Wesselius

    I was more impressed by this book than I thought I would be. My distaste for Jeffery Sachs stems from his intervention in Eastern Europe specifically Poland where I thought his "shock therapy" was unnecessary and determintal to people as much as it was good for macroeconomic statistics. His blase dismissal of the middle age workforce he acknowledged was disrupted and hurt by his policies did little to impress me. The first part of the book recounts his Polish and other experiences and are far mo I was more impressed by this book than I thought I would be. My distaste for Jeffery Sachs stems from his intervention in Eastern Europe specifically Poland where I thought his "shock therapy" was unnecessary and determintal to people as much as it was good for macroeconomic statistics. His blase dismissal of the middle age workforce he acknowledged was disrupted and hurt by his policies did little to impress me. The first part of the book recounts his Polish and other experiences and are far more interesting than the second part where he lays out in an alphabet soup of agencies, reports and goals that he thinks may be helpful. Its apparent that he has learned from his experience and is less market inclined thah he was initially. However, he still fails to credit non-market policies when he should. India's jump into the IT world as opposed to the traditional sweatshop labour of most Third World countries stems from Nehru's education policies. Nehru fails to recieve proper credit and is dismissed as the License Raj for his fondness of bureacracy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anders K.

    Note: Old review. TEOP may be canon in the development field but should merely be read as a starting point, or perhaps a snapshot of development theory in the early 2000s from a simplistic liberal econ perspective. ----------------- I strongly believe that this is an important book to read for everyone of our generation. Although Sachs at times seems like an ideologist, I share his sentiments and I am grateful for how his book portrays that ending extreme poverty is within our grasp- and probably Note: Old review. TEOP may be canon in the development field but should merely be read as a starting point, or perhaps a snapshot of development theory in the early 2000s from a simplistic liberal econ perspective. ----------------- I strongly believe that this is an important book to read for everyone of our generation. Although Sachs at times seems like an ideologist, I share his sentiments and I am grateful for how his book portrays that ending extreme poverty is within our grasp- and probably a lot simpler than we think. His experiences weave a compelling narrative which provides generalized but valuable lessons on development work. His check-list approach to the causes of (and solutions to) poverty is widely discredited for being overly simplistic and essentializing, and many disagree with his old 'shock therapy' approach (which he has supposedly distanced himself from in later years), but 'The End of Poverty' remains an important starting point in the development studies literature.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    A new way to think of global economics, for sure. I need some time to process his concept of capitalism with a heart as the best vehicle for social justice. I can respect the way Sachs tries to find a middle ground between dog-eat-dog free-market systems and closed authoritarian systems. A little repetitive at the end and not super well-written.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Okay, I would most likely never have read this book anyway, but chapter 3 of Mexico Unconquered begins with some of Sachs' ideas and basically says how far off base he is, so I'm going to quote/summarize some of John Gibler's comments from Mexico Unconquered. Gibler quotes Sachs: "Let me dispose of one idea right from the start. Many people assume that the rich have gotten rich because the poor have gotten poor. In other words, they assume that Europe and the United States used military force an Okay, I would most likely never have read this book anyway, but chapter 3 of Mexico Unconquered begins with some of Sachs' ideas and basically says how far off base he is, so I'm going to quote/summarize some of John Gibler's comments from Mexico Unconquered. Gibler quotes Sachs: "Let me dispose of one idea right from the start. Many people assume that the rich have gotten rich because the poor have gotten poor. In other words, they assume that Europe and the United States used military force and political strength during and after the era of colonialism to extract wealth from the poorest regions, and thereby to grow rich" (89). Gibler points out Sachs' immediate dismissal of this idea ("Let me dispose of one idea right from the start"), without even considering it or having a thought-out argument about it, as if "the idea has no basis in historical reality" (90). Strike one. Strike two: please prove to me that's wrong. If you're going to say that this is an unworthy view, tell me why it's not. Because, really, they did, right? Europe and the U.S. *did* use military force and political strength to extract wealth from areas and people who couldn't stand up to them. Next: Sachs also says "The key fact of modern times is not the transfer of income from one region to another, by force or otherwise, but rather the overall increase in world income, but at a different rate in different regions" (qtd. p. 89). Gibler responds by saying that Sachs is basically considering enslavement, slaughter, land theft, and genocide as a "transfer of economic goods" (91). So, okay, you consider slave labor, land theft, etc., as a simple "transfer of income...by force," an "Oopsie, maybe they had to get rough a little." Also, an "increase in world income, but at a different rate in different regions" -- could those be the natives the Europeans took the land from, and the enslaved people they brought to work their ("their") new (Newly found! Look ma, I was just walking along, and tripped over this land that didn't belong to anyone! Can I keep it?) land? That's definitely a different rate in income: the natives and slaves had a rate of 0 (more like a rate of a negative number, what with their own resources and land being taken away from them), while the Europeans had an actual positive rate, and both situations have continued. Gibler later quotes Sachs as saying "The Americans, for example, believe that they earned their wealth all by themselves. They forget that they inherited a vast continent rich in natural resources..." (92). Sachs seems to believe that the Americans inherited their land and resources. He forgets that the European explorers came over and forcibly took the land and resources away from the people who were living here, forced them off their home lands, forced people from other continents to come to this land and work the natural resources, and neglected to let them be free or own their own land, which, for both of these non-European groups, led to them living -- and continuing to live, thanks to years and years of systemic racism -- in poverty. Sachs also says that the "white man's burden" was "the right and obligation of European and European-descended whites to rule the lives of others..." (qtd. p. 92-93). Now, Gibler takes offense to a different part of the quote, which I haven't included, and at first, I did, too, but on re-reading, I wonder if Sachs is actually making the same point Gibler is, but not as strongly. Still, my problem is with the white man's burden being "the right and obligation" of the white men. Not *perceived* right and obligation, or "they saw it as their right and obligation"; Sachs uses no language to imply or state that this was *their* view; he makes it sound like he's right there with them that The White Man's Burden Is To Civilize Everyone Else, And That's Just HOW IT IS. True, Sachs calls The White Man's Burden "infamous," but ... can we throw a qualifier like "perceived" or "they thought" or "they felt like" in there? Based on just these few passages that Gibler quotes, as well as his overall summary of Sachs' book and the fantasy world he seems to be living in, I can't imagine what other tripe is in Sachs' arguments.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    A rallying whimper JDN 24565554 PDT 20:54. A review of The End of Poverty by Jeffrey Sachs This should have been one of the greatest books ever written. It should have been the rallying cry for a radical new approach to global development, a seminal advance in what it means to do economics—it should have been quite literally a book to save a billion lives. And make no mistake, Jeffrey Sachs has a project that really does have the potential to have that kind of impact. But The End of Poverty doesn't A rallying whimper JDN 24565554 PDT 20:54. A review of The End of Poverty by Jeffrey Sachs This should have been one of the greatest books ever written. It should have been the rallying cry for a radical new approach to global development, a seminal advance in what it means to do economics—it should have been quite literally a book to save a billion lives. And make no mistake, Jeffrey Sachs has a project that really does have the potential to have that kind of impact. But The End of Poverty doesn't quite manage to sell that project, for reasons that are not all that easy to pin down. I think part of the problem is that Sachs was trained as a neoclassical economist and hasn't quite managed to break free from this indoctrination. This makes Sachs, and thus The End of Poverty, of two minds: On the one hand he wants to say that the Washington Consensus has failed, capitalism is in crisis, and we are approaching a fundamental paradigm shift in development economics. On the other hand, he keeps talking about market incentives and rational expectations, and dismisses socialism as an obvious failure—even though many of the reforms he wants are in some sense socialist reforms. I couldn't find the passage when I looked back to quote it, but there's even a section where he talks about the shift from communism to capitalism and says "only then did unemployment emerge" and makes it sound like a good thing. It's really bizarre; rather than saying, "Yes, these workers had to bear the pain of unemployment, but in the long run the market reforms were necessary and made everyone better off," he actually speaks as though he thinks laying off all those state employees was intrinsically beneficial. At the end of the book he calls upon us to see past narrow self-interest and work to create the world we want to live in. This is exactly right; and like him, I do believe it is possible. But in earlier pages he talks about how collective farms obviously fail because they don't have market incentives... and I find myself asking, "Well, why couldn't they see past narrow self-interest?" Much of what Sachs says is not only right, it is desperately needed. His message sounds like a pipe dream—ending poverty in less than 20 years?—but his economic sophistication is undeniable. He not only shows how it can be done, he calculates how much it would cost and what would be the most efficient way to pay for it. The number he derives is now widely accepted by development economists, yet so few laypeople comprehend it: $100 billion per year. 0.7% of GDP. That's how much the United States would need to spend; the rest of the First World, mostly Europe and Japan, would add another $100 billion. And that's it. That's all it would take. For less than 1% of our total income, we could end extreme poverty forever. Now, to be fair, this is extreme poverty—it's the kind of crushing poverty that leaves you starving in a rusting shack made of corrugated steel in a slum by the train tracks in Ghana. Sachs is not proposing to eliminate relative poverty—the dramatic difference between the richest and the poorest in the US—and it's not clear whether his plan would even fully eradicate absolute poverty—the state in which some people don't have enough to meet their basic needs. There are some things that might be considered "basic needs", especially in a First World society (like electricity, transportation, and dentistry) that might still remain out of reach for some of the world's poor. But Sachs' proposal really does have a serious chance of ensuring that everyone in the world has food to eat, water to drink, shelter to live in, and basic medical care. Sachs asks us to imagine a world without starvation or malaria, and then provides concrete steps we could take right now to get us closer to that world. The problem is, Sachs appears torn between the neoclassical concept of selfishness and an idealistic concept of altruism. What he needs is a fundamentally new paradigm, something that is neither selfishness nor altruism—what he needs is what I call the tribal paradigm. Humans are not selfish individual utility maximizers; indeed, one would have to be a psychopath to act that way. But nor are we selfless altruists, giving everything we have to anyone who asks. The default setting for human moral intuition is tribalism—it is to think in terms of an "in group" that we are altruistic toward, and an "out group" that we are not. Put another way, our unit of rational action is the tribe, not the individual. I'm actually working on how I might work this into an empirical paper or an econometric argument—perhaps my master's thesis will ultimately be titled, "The Tribal Paradigm"—but for now, let me offer some illustrative examples. Are racists selfish? Is it acting in your self-interest to hate Black people? No, it isn't. Indeed, the reason neoclassicists have thus far utterly failed to explain or respond to racism is that it couldn't exist within their model of human behavior. There would always be a market incentive to not be racist, because whatever the color of their skin, the color of their money is the same. But does this mean racists are altruistic? It certainly seems odd to say so; if they're such altruists, shouldn't they be nicer to Black people? The answer is that they are tribalists—they are altruistic to their in-group (White people) and not to those outside it. Here's another example, particularly relevant to economics: We often speak of "the firm" or "firms" as economic agents with well-defined interests and actions. Sometimes we speak of "the government" in a similar way. But for fundamental game-theory reasons, there's no reason to think that the interests of a firm are the same as the interests of any individual in that firm, or even necessarily an aggregate of all their interests put together. Yet we can with some accuracy predict the behavior of firms by assuming they are self-interested agents; how? Because sometimes people identify with the company as their tribe. And let's be honest: Who in the US government doesn't think of the US government, or the American people as a whole, as their tribe? You have to at least convincingly fake such tribalism to even be elected—we call this "patriotism". I certainly hope Sachs succeeds. I just wish he were a little better at selling it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Izzie

    I found Jeffrey Sachs' The End of Poverty to be extremely enlightening and informative on the issues of poverty, globalization, and the issues developing countries face that prevent them to achieve the first steps towards economic development. I'll admit to having no prior knowledge or experience in this area, especially in economics. There were parts of the book where I became confused by the data explained and density of the writing, but, in general, Sachs' ideas are easy to comprehend and c I found Jeffrey Sachs' The End of Poverty to be extremely enlightening and informative on the issues of poverty, globalization, and the issues developing countries face that prevent them to achieve the first steps towards economic development. I'll admit to having no prior knowledge or experience in this area, especially in economics. There were parts of the book where I became confused by the data explained and density of the writing, but, in general, Sachs' ideas are easy to comprehend and clarified in very specific detail. Sachs shows how all issues, like climate, health, poverty, technology, etc., are interconnected and effective different communities. Sachs passionately argues on what the reader and the global community can do to help improve the conditions of impoverished countries and communities. Additionally in the book, Sachs describes his work as an economist and advisor to other countries, like Bolivia, Poland, and India. His recount of his experience in those countries are fascinating to read about and I don't find myself saying that often about economics. This book was thorough, thoughtful, and gave the reader information that appears very practical to implement. After finishing The End of Poverty , I definitely felt Sachs' call to action to end extreme poverty.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Kettler

    I read this book several years ago as an undergrad and picked it up at a garage sale to re-read. Although I do think several of Sachs ideas have merit, I couldn’t get over some of the language he used to describe African countries. In addition to painting a very general picture of the continent, I found his description propagated the narrative of Africa being a “dark” continent in need of “saving”. To his credit, he has done some very important work - especially related to health (HIV/AIDS) but I read this book several years ago as an undergrad and picked it up at a garage sale to re-read. Although I do think several of Sachs ideas have merit, I couldn’t get over some of the language he used to describe African countries. In addition to painting a very general picture of the continent, I found his description propagated the narrative of Africa being a “dark” continent in need of “saving”. To his credit, he has done some very important work - especially related to health (HIV/AIDS) but I do think the way he speaks about poverty contributes to a colonial/white saviour narrative.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allison Olson

    Well written and intriguing, but I was looking for more of a boots on the ground directive of how to help those in poverty. This does give a great overview of the history and the situation and the fix.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    The book epitomizes a top-down, experts-know-best approach to international development. Sachs is knowledgeable, but oh so arrogant. Read this in combination with William Easterly's The White Man's Burden, just to get a little balance. Sachs' fawning praise for the celebrities and politicians who either wrote reviews for the book or retain him as an expert consultant is particularly distasteful. That said, it's worth reading.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette Lukens

    This reads like an autobiography, which seemed a little bit strange, but it is very impressive what Sachs has participated in and accomplished. I think the most interesting and may be poignant Takeaway was how often and consistently there exists prejudiced against those in poverty.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kuljinder Singh

    very outstanding book , thoughtprovoking and informative

  26. 4 out of 5

    Praneesh K

    Quick primer on development economics.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Willis

    Very powerful book, Sach's is very passionate on the topic of world poverty and how billions of the world's population is living on less than $1 a day. He details policies and ideas that have been tried and those that he believes can work to end world poverty. It is amazing to me that an book by an economist can come across as more christian and how do we help the poor and disadvantaged than a lot of christians that I come in contact with on the same subject. Well written book and it gave me a n Very powerful book, Sach's is very passionate on the topic of world poverty and how billions of the world's population is living on less than $1 a day. He details policies and ideas that have been tried and those that he believes can work to end world poverty. It is amazing to me that an book by an economist can come across as more christian and how do we help the poor and disadvantaged than a lot of christians that I come in contact with on the same subject. Well written book and it gave me a new perspective on globalization and working together.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ashna Kumar

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENT “Any accomplishment requires work and effort of many people.” This book review is no different. We ‘Group-29' has reviewed the book “End of property by Jeffery D. Sachs “.Working on this assignment was a source of immense knowledge to us. The entire work is done by six members: Abhishek, Aditya, Akriti, Ayushi, Ashna & Giti. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to Dr. Mala Reddy and Akash Sondhi for their guidance and valuable support throughout the entire course. We ack ACKNOWLEDGEMENT “Any accomplishment requires work and effort of many people.” This book review is no different. We ‘Group-29' has reviewed the book “End of property by Jeffery D. Sachs “.Working on this assignment was a source of immense knowledge to us. The entire work is done by six members: Abhishek, Aditya, Akriti, Ayushi, Ashna & Giti. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to Dr. Mala Reddy and Akash Sondhi for their guidance and valuable support throughout the entire course. We acknowledge with a deep sense of gratitude and encouragement from our faculty members and classmates. “Poverty is not a fate, it is a condition; it is not misfortune, it is an injustice” In today’s time much of the people are dreaming of a poverty free world as it has been a serious and a long lasting issue since years. The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. Similarly, this book talks about the scholarly expertise and experience to argue extreme global poverty which can be eliminated by the year 2025 i.e. if the wealthy nations of the world truly wish to do so. Sachs says the initial step ought to be to increment outside guide in a way that would give a more prominent come back to private venture. Once these speculations are made, private business visionaries will acquire a more noteworthy rate of profit for their organizations, activating business sector drove monetary development. He subtle elements a multidimensional arrangement for global mediation that goes past basic market financial matters - including human capital, business capital, normal capital, open institutional capital, learning capital and foundation. In these pages Sachs' technocratic energy rises over. At a certain point he composes that the greater part of the difficulties of extraordinary destitution ''can be met, with known, demonstrated, solid and suitable advances and intercessions.'' He puts forth a ground-breaking defense: the sorts of innovations he calls for incorporate composts, cellphones, antiretroviral AIDS medications and antimalarial bed nets. For skeptics who question whether the universal network has the will to achieve such a great undertaking, Sachs brings up that worldwide endeavors on this scale have prevailing previously: the annihilation of smallpox and the Green Revolution in Asia are cases. He additionally noticed that his proposed yearly spending plan is still not as much as the promise made by the created world at the 2002 Monterey Summit to give 0.7 percent of its total national output to advancement help. Sachs' evangelist enthusiasm is irresistible, yet the defects in ''The End of Poverty'' should sound essential notes of alert. There is, for a certain something, the matter of Sachs' conscience. Any individual who can compose that ''as a youthful employee, I addressed generally to high recognition, distributed comprehensively and was on a quick scholastic move to residency, which I got in 1983 when I was 28'' unmistakably does not have the endowment of modest representation of the truth. This confidence in his own particular capacities is the thing that permitted him, as a relative newcomer to improvement financial matters, to pronounce that he had discovered the response to extraordinary worldwide destitution where other people who had dedicated their lives to it have fizzled. Be that as it may, long-term specialists in the field who read this book may feel a solid feeling of history repeating itself. They should. A lot of Sachs' contention can be summed up in this section from Walt W. Rostow's book ''The Stages of Economic Growth,'' written in 1960: ''The formation of the preconditions for departure was to a great extent a matter of building social overhead capital - railroads, ports and streets - and of finding a monetary setting in which a move from horticulture and exchange to fabricate was gainful.'' Sachs fails to specify the degree to which the Rostow demonstrate overwhelmed dialogs of improvement in the 1950's, 60's and 70's. Yet, in that period, waste and defilement filled out United Nations offices and beneficiary governments while doing next to no for poor people. As the advancement master William Easterly has watched, Sachs' attempt to close the deal has been made before, and the outcomes were pitiful. Somewhere else, Sachs oversells or repudiates his own particular contentions. On the topic of AIDS avoidance, for instance, he triumphantly refers to an ongoing article to contend against the theory that Africans take part in more sexual action outside of marriage than is the situation in different societies. Sachs' declaration, while politically right, is missing the goal. The plain article he refers to proceeds to state that as a result of ''the significantly higher number of total sexual acts'' with only one parent present in nations like Uganda, the probability of H.I.V. transmission is significantly more prominent in Africa. Moreover, these sexual practices make handy solution arrangements - like advancing condom utilize - significantly less successful. Also, Sachs expels commentators who contend that culture is a critical factor in clarifying neediness even as he surrenders that religious and social conventions have kept ladies from instructing themselves, which thusly has impeded improvement. He recognizes that legislatures ought not to put resources into business capital: ''When governments run organizations, they have a tendency to do as such for political instead of monetary reasons.'' But he neglects to consider exactly how much this announcement applies to everything governments run. His implicit supposition is that administrations as degenerate as Nigeria's or Kenya's would assign wellbeing or training interests in a nonpolitical way. Sachs additionally says things that may distance potential partners. He wisely watches that before, bolster from America's religious right has been vital for empowering outside guide. In the meantime he hates ''silly scriptural prescience,'' which, he says, ''is frightening for those of us who might preferably utilize judiciousness than scriptural prediction to decide U.S. outside approach.'' This is not really the sort of remark computed to win Christian moderates to his side. It's very far-fetched that Sachs' proposition will ever be embraced in full. But then, is there some other method for burning through $150 billion a year that would decrease outrageous destitution all the more successfully? Regardless of whether ''The End of Poverty'' is just half right, the result would be tremendous: in excess of 500 million individuals made a difference. Sachs hasn't discovered a beyond any doubt thing. In any case, that doesn't mean his wager ought not to be made. For instance, while recognizing that defilement and poor administration in low-pay nations must be survived if help is to be powerful, he uncovered the dissatisfactions looked by moderately all around administered nations, for example, Ghana, who in spite of their very much contemplated national techniques are still stonewalled by an absence of global office bolster. The deplorability of HIV/AIDS rose, all things considered, in conditions where wellbeing spending plans in many nations in sub-Saharan Africa were overshadowed by obligation reimbursement commitments to rich nations (a sharp differentiation to how the US had given help to post– World War II remaking through the Marshall Plan, as is distinctly exhibited). The methodical disappointment of rich nations to satisfy their guarantees may eventually remain the most crucial shortcoming of the pronouncement that Sachs has created. It is hard to have confidence in the practicality of the world's intense all of a sudden taking up his medicines when these same nations so disappointingly moved far from looking up to their responsibility for destroying neediness and meeting Millennium Development Goals at the UN's Summit and the G8 meeting in 2005. Sachs invests little energy considering how other worldwide powers might be required to weight a move in approach, as was seen at the round of universal exchange talks in Cancun when low-and center wage nations declined to acknowledge the motivation being advanced by the world's well off, for example, assist limitations on global property rights. Also, there is nary a specify of nations, for example, Cuba that have opposed customary improvement models and gave phenomenal wellbeing results notwithstanding powerless financial development. Another shortcoming of the book is the normal routine with regards to a storyteller setting himself in a positive light and staying away from self-basic evaluations. In asserting triumph for the fruitful vanquishing of hyperinflation in Bolivia, for instance, Sachs treads gently on the extreme auxiliary issues of destitution that hold on, frequently irritated by the privatization that his strategy proposals advanced. In spite of its restrictions, The End of Poverty makes an imposing commitment to our comprehension of the abberations that assault our 21st-century world, and an update that the potential for change exists on the off chance that we can gather the essential political will. The outrageous poor need not generally be with us all things considered. The key, Sachs says, lies more in the money related responsibility of the rich nations than in the fixation on misrule advanced by the United States, Britain and others. Shockingly, in spite of Blair's guarantees to put Africa all important focal point at the G8, and the Make Poverty History coalition's admonishments, these cures are not quite offer, basically in light of the fact that the US doesn't get them. Contrasted with the less conspicuous however more extensive Africa Commission, an assemblage of African heads of state and other people who contemplated for a year and revealed a month ago in some detail on how best to enable Africa to build up, Sachs' answers appear to be thin. The Africa officials, as well, look for all that he needs, however they perceive that other significant issues, for example, struggle, the assault of assets, natural debasement, privatization, multinational organizations, populace increments and urban ghettos must be thought about as well. In the meantime, Bono, who trusts Sachs is a standout amongst the most imaginative and wonderful individuals on the planet, is regularly liberal, contributing an enthusiastic foreword indicating how this age can end the degenerate connection between the ground-breaking and the weakest parts of the world. In any case, with deference, that isn't indistinguishable thing from terminating all outrageous neediness. Finally we can conclude that, “The end of poverty is road map to a more prosperous and secure world”. GROUP G29 Ayushi Ashna Giti Abhishek Aditya Akriti

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Sachs focuses on the plight of the 1 billion people in extreme poverty, of which 20,000 perish each day. The book centers on the idea that we need to help the extreme poor to climb onto the ladder of economic development, which is currently out of their reach. Eight problems are noted that can cause a country to fail: Poverty trap (unable to accumulate capital per person), physical geography, fiscal trap (limited government resources), governance failures, cultural barriers (undermined rights of Sachs focuses on the plight of the 1 billion people in extreme poverty, of which 20,000 perish each day. The book centers on the idea that we need to help the extreme poor to climb onto the ladder of economic development, which is currently out of their reach. Eight problems are noted that can cause a country to fail: Poverty trap (unable to accumulate capital per person), physical geography, fiscal trap (limited government resources), governance failures, cultural barriers (undermined rights of parts of population), geopolitics (trade barriers), lack of innovation (lack of markets) and demographic trap (high fertility rates). Getting the first foot on the economic development ladder requires six types of capital: human capital (health, nutrition, and skills needed for each person to be economically productive), business capital (the machinery, facilities, motorized transport used in agriculture, industry and services), infrastructure (roads, power, water and sanitation, airports and seaports and telecommunications systems), natural capital (arable land, healthy soils, biodiversity and well functioning ecosystems), public institutional capital (commercial law, judicial systems, government services and policing) and knowledge capital (scientific and technological know-how). Prosperity ultimately spreads when technology and ideas have a foundation to flourish upon. Like clinical medicine in the treatment of a body, we need to understand how the interrelated facets of a country and region interrelate through a differential and context based diagnosis to solve the extreme poverty problem. Support needs to focus on addressing the interrelated problems concurrently rather than in isolation. This would consist of approximately $60 US of aid per person per year, well within the 0.7% GNP commitment made by all developed countries. The problem is that the true nature of aid is hidden in a sea of numbers. Of the 2002 gross foreign aid of $76b, only $12b went to low income countries in a form deemed to be budgetary support. Viewed specifically in the context of Africa, of the $30 per sub-Saharan African aid contributed by the global community in 2002, $5 went to consultants from donor countries, $3 went to food and emergency aid, $4 went to servicing debts and $5 for debt relief, leaving only $12 to go directly to Africa (the US contribution being $0.06). We must act upon the injustice of circumstances today to address the problems compounded over centuries. Africa for example has been subjected to three centuries of slave trade (1500-1800s) followed by a century of brutal colonial rule. The colonial era left Africa bereft of educated citizens and leaders, basic infrastructure and public health facilities. The borders of the newly independent states followed arbitrary lines of the former empires dividing ethnic groups, ecosystems, watersheds and resource deposits. After the colonial period Africa became a pawn in the cold war and was frequently manipulated by the West that contributed to a series of political crisis. No culture or society should be destined to perpetual poverty. In the 1870s the Japan Gazette predicted that Japan will never be rich because of their indolence and backward principles. The book ended with a quote from Robert Kennedy which I liked: "Let no one be discouraged by the belief there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of the world's ills - against misery and ignorance, injustice and violence...Few will have the greatness to bend history itself; but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation...It is from the numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    This is a good book and it shares with us Sach's wealth of experience in international economics. The problem for me is that I read Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty first, and that book changed the whole way I look at politics and international development- it was mind-blowing. Sachs suffers from the comparison with kind of run-of-the-mill recommendations. This is a good book and it shares with us Sach's wealth of experience in international economics. The problem for me is that I read Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty first, and that book changed the whole way I look at politics and international development- it was mind-blowing. Sachs suffers from the comparison with kind of run-of-the-mill recommendations.

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