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The Oxford Anthology of English Literature 4: Romantic Poetry & Prose

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This volume devotes over 100 pages to William Blake, including The Book of Thel and the entire "Night the Ninth" from The Four Zoas, as well as excerpts from Milton and Jerusalem. It also includes poems and prose by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron. This volume devotes over 100 pages to William Blake, including The Book of Thel and the entire "Night the Ninth" from The Four Zoas, as well as excerpts from Milton and Jerusalem. It also includes poems and prose by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron.


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This volume devotes over 100 pages to William Blake, including The Book of Thel and the entire "Night the Ninth" from The Four Zoas, as well as excerpts from Milton and Jerusalem. It also includes poems and prose by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron. This volume devotes over 100 pages to William Blake, including The Book of Thel and the entire "Night the Ninth" from The Four Zoas, as well as excerpts from Milton and Jerusalem. It also includes poems and prose by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron.

30 review for The Oxford Anthology of English Literature 4: Romantic Poetry & Prose

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    Every single great poem of this era is here! And then there's Harold Bloom's commentary - worth reading even without the benefit of the poetry! Every single great poem of this era is here! And then there's Harold Bloom's commentary - worth reading even without the benefit of the poetry!

  2. 5 out of 5

    J. Alfred

    My thoughts on the Great Romantic Poets (in chronological order): Blake, at least in his longer works, has to be the least intelligible of any writer in the Western canon from Ezekiel to Eliot. Wordsworth can get dry at times but is generally a pure pleasure to read. Coleridge is downright exciting. Someone has probably made a graphic novel out of The Ancient Mariner. Byron has this tortured sort of intelligence that alternates between real humor and despairing sarcasm-- I think he could fit right My thoughts on the Great Romantic Poets (in chronological order): Blake, at least in his longer works, has to be the least intelligible of any writer in the Western canon from Ezekiel to Eliot. Wordsworth can get dry at times but is generally a pure pleasure to read. Coleridge is downright exciting. Someone has probably made a graphic novel out of The Ancient Mariner. Byron has this tortured sort of intelligence that alternates between real humor and despairing sarcasm-- I think he could fit right into our society without skipping a beat. Shelley takes work to appreciate, but he is as magnificent as a slightly mystical, brilliant humanistic optimist could possibly be. Chesterson said that Keats is the only English poetry who was incapable of writing a bad line. Read "Hyperion," see what you think!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    This book has an excellent collection of Romantic Poetry and excerpts from many important prose documents as well, like Shelley's "A Defence of Poetry." It also has in depth insights from the masterful critics, Bloom and Trilling. For anyone who enjoys Romantic period work, or would like to know more about the predecessors to poets like Whitman and Frost, this book is very much worthwhile. This book has an excellent collection of Romantic Poetry and excerpts from many important prose documents as well, like Shelley's "A Defence of Poetry." It also has in depth insights from the masterful critics, Bloom and Trilling. For anyone who enjoys Romantic period work, or would like to know more about the predecessors to poets like Whitman and Frost, this book is very much worthwhile.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ross McKie

    Has to be open at all times while reading Ross Woodman's, "Sanity, Madness, Transformation: The Psyche in Romanticism." Also-- I knew I had a soul! I just knew it! Has to be open at all times while reading Ross Woodman's, "Sanity, Madness, Transformation: The Psyche in Romanticism." Also-- I knew I had a soul! I just knew it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is one college textbook that I will always have with me. Has the best poetic work from the likes of Colridge, Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelly as well as commentary and philisophical writings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Great poems. Awesome anthology.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mandie

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mel mehitabel

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Pavelle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Renata

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hemingwayhero

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

  15. 5 out of 5

    GAURAV

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Herold

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katharine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Kimble

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rashi Bhaya

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cammy

  24. 4 out of 5

    John Dalton

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wesley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Horn Bori

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jon Frankel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  30. 5 out of 5

    dipandjelly

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