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An infamous gossip columnist is fatally stabbed in the back. The story circles a Yankees pitcher, a pop star, and an actor's apparently accidental overdose. Nikki Heat and hotshot reporter Jameson Rook trade barbs and innuendos while on the trail of a murderer. An infamous gossip columnist is fatally stabbed in the back. The story circles a Yankees pitcher, a pop star, and an actor's apparently accidental overdose. Nikki Heat and hotshot reporter Jameson Rook trade barbs and innuendos while on the trail of a murderer.


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An infamous gossip columnist is fatally stabbed in the back. The story circles a Yankees pitcher, a pop star, and an actor's apparently accidental overdose. Nikki Heat and hotshot reporter Jameson Rook trade barbs and innuendos while on the trail of a murderer. An infamous gossip columnist is fatally stabbed in the back. The story circles a Yankees pitcher, a pop star, and an actor's apparently accidental overdose. Nikki Heat and hotshot reporter Jameson Rook trade barbs and innuendos while on the trail of a murderer.

30 review for Naked Heat

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 78% | Good Notes: A complex plot, but seeded well enough that revelations and sudden turns don't feel grafted, but sprout organically. (B+) 78% | Good Notes: A complex plot, but seeded well enough that revelations and sudden turns don't feel grafted, but sprout organically.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Fanning

    As a fairly straight-forward work of mystery fiction, THREE STARS. People are murdered, clues are discovered, twists and turns, a narrow escape, a revelation, a sudden dead-end, kissy kissy, frantic chase, mystery solved, wait or is it?, ok now yes, mystery solved. Or something like that? I don't know. That's not the part I was paying attention to. BECAUSE as a cultural artifact that is such an engaging, layered and thoughtful piece of fan-fiction that I could barely even wrap my head around it, As a fairly straight-forward work of mystery fiction, THREE STARS. People are murdered, clues are discovered, twists and turns, a narrow escape, a revelation, a sudden dead-end, kissy kissy, frantic chase, mystery solved, wait or is it?, ok now yes, mystery solved. Or something like that? I don't know. That's not the part I was paying attention to. BECAUSE as a cultural artifact that is such an engaging, layered and thoughtful piece of fan-fiction that I could barely even wrap my head around it, FOUR STARS. Nathan Fillion plays a TV character named Richard Castle. Richard Castle is in love with Kate Beckett but it never really amounts to anything on the TV show. Which is great! It's what makes TV work--the wanting it to happen, but not having to deal with the inevitable boring Sam & Diane consequences. But the character Richard Castle has written a book inspired by Kate Beckett, called Naked Heat, and in Naked Heat, Castle's stand in, Jameson Rook, totally gets it on with Beckett's stand in, Nikki Heat. Of course, the book wasn't really written by Richard Castle or Nathan Fillion, we don't know who it's written by. So, like, either it's officially-sanctioned fanfic, which is brilliant, or ABC just gave someone in marketing a bunch of money and said "Uh, do...something?" which is even more impressive. Because yes, it's a marketing gimmick, ha ha, the TV author actually has books you can read, and there are pictures of Nathan Fillion on the back. But like, is this really going to convince anyone to watch the show? Doubtful! And is it going to sell millions and millions of copies and become a secondary source of revenue for the production company? Probably not! So it's really kind of a fun little shippy love note from the show to the fans. Which is amazing! Like fanfic finally won one, you know? The book opens up a whole window on this alternate universe that the show won't let us have, but that fans of the show think about and want desperately. Yes we do want it desperately, we want to see Nathan Fillion making out with Stana Katic. But that's not all! There is other interesting stuff happening here! Inside the in-game of the fake book written by the fake TV character, this is another in-game! And it's the ghost-writer commenting on their lot in life. Firstly, there's a part early on where detectives get compared to ghostwriters. Not a metaphor you read everyday, or a reference you generally see in a book that is clearly ghostwritten. My ears perked up. Then we find out something interesting about Jameson Rook. On the show, Richard Castle is a noted mystery author who hangs out with other noted authors. But Jameson Rook--even though he has the same voice and persona as Richard Castle--is NOT a noted author. He's a magazine writer, who also, it is revealed, happens to ghost-write romance novels. There are a bunch of jokes about this, and a bunch of embarrassment on Rook's part about the true nature of his/the author's work. Wouldn't it have been so much easier for either Richard Castle or the author to just use the same backstory for Jameson Rook that we have for Richard Castle? None of the other book characters diverge so wildly from their TV counterparts. Weird, right? (Never even mind the part where Nikki Heat has read and liked Jameson Rook's steamy ghostwritten romance fiction, which adds a whole other layer of sexy, shippy, fan-fic-ness that I can't even deal with.) BECAUSE! AND THEN! There's this blink and miss it part towards the end where Jameson Rook goes off to do some investigating in the company of Detectives Malcolm and Reynolds. And that was when I completely lost my shit. FIVE STARS. THIS AUTHOR KNOWS THEIR AUDIENCE. I am someone who a) writes things about TV characters, and b) watches Castle. And I thought this must be such an impossibly small and targeted Venn diagram for a book like this. But maybe it's not? Maybe the person whose idea this was just knows their audience really extremely well. Because for people like us, a book like this is our Ulysses and our Waiting for Godot and our Hamlet. This is shit that we will talk about and talk about and talk about. Dear Whoever Wrote This: Look, I know there's some contract you had to sign or something to keep your identity hidden. I don't care what else you've written, whether it's magazine articles or romance novels or what, I'm just saying I really like the cut of your jib, and I want to read everything else you've done. Please.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Donna Backshall

    What can I say? Richard Castle's Nikki Heat series isn't fine literature, but it's as perfectly satisfying and indulgent as the TV show Castle. Between the searing political non-fiction and the high-tech sci-fi, sometimes you just need a little mind candy to cleanse your palate. Naked Heat was deliciously readable, and I'll definitely continue the series. What can I say? Richard Castle's Nikki Heat series isn't fine literature, but it's as perfectly satisfying and indulgent as the TV show Castle. Between the searing political non-fiction and the high-tech sci-fi, sometimes you just need a little mind candy to cleanse your palate. Naked Heat was deliciously readable, and I'll definitely continue the series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mojca

    I’m happy to report, this was a huge improvement from the previous book (Heat Wave). While the first one came through as more of an inside joke, riding the tidal wave of the Castle TV show and seemed more like a fanfiction than an actual book written by a “New York Times Bestselling Author”, this one actually read like a book. The writing and style was the first obvious improvement, the characters had (a little) more depth— though still not enough for my liking, the pacing was good, and so was th I’m happy to report, this was a huge improvement from the previous book (Heat Wave). While the first one came through as more of an inside joke, riding the tidal wave of the Castle TV show and seemed more like a fanfiction than an actual book written by a “New York Times Bestselling Author”, this one actually read like a book. The writing and style was the first obvious improvement, the characters had (a little) more depth— though still not enough for my liking, the pacing was good, and so was the plot, and the villain was a little more difficult to spot. I’m so glad I decided to read this right after Heat Wave, because it improved my notion of “Richard Castle” as an actual writer in a big way. Also, the fact Rook wasn’t such an idiot was a major plus, though I still have some reservations regarding Nikki Heat. Now I can go back to the TV show (which is still better than the books, even for a big Caskett shipper like me) and wait for the next book in this series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    K.

    14/7/2016 So apparently my reading tastes have changed A LOT in the past five years. Because this was like wading through quicksand, and I could only get through 102 pages before I gave up and abandoned it. Really, this is self-insert fan-fiction of a fictional world. Like, it's supposed to be written by a fictional character. About a fictional version of himself and fictional versions of his friends. I gave very few fucks about the case, and given that I haven't watched Castle in at least three 14/7/2016 So apparently my reading tastes have changed A LOT in the past five years. Because this was like wading through quicksand, and I could only get through 102 pages before I gave up and abandoned it. Really, this is self-insert fan-fiction of a fictional world. Like, it's supposed to be written by a fictional character. About a fictional version of himself and fictional versions of his friends. I gave very few fucks about the case, and given that I haven't watched Castle in at least three years, the whole fictional-novelist-writes-the-book-he-writes-in-the-fictional-world schtick was no longer appealing to me. But really, this is 100% a me thing and a product of my reading tastes having done a dramatic turn down Not This Lane. Also, my copy smells really weird, so making the decision to put it down wasn't terribly difficult... 16/10/2011 Not the greatest book of all time, obviously, but it kept me amused for a day or two.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jacob the Bookworm

    "I've been thinking about how ugly gossip is. How it victimizes people, but how as much as we say we hate it, we still feed on it like it was crack.” This book was really good. I mean, it's no literary great, but it's still good. It reads just like an episode of Castle, with the chapters breaks being where the commercial breaks would be. I wouldn't recommend this to people who have either never seen the Castle or dislike it. The characters in this novel are carbon copies of Castle, Beckett, Ryan "I've been thinking about how ugly gossip is. How it victimizes people, but how as much as we say we hate it, we still feed on it like it was crack.” This book was really good. I mean, it's no literary great, but it's still good. It reads just like an episode of Castle, with the chapters breaks being where the commercial breaks would be. I wouldn't recommend this to people who have either never seen the Castle or dislike it. The characters in this novel are carbon copies of Castle, Beckett, Ryan, Esposito, and Lanie from the show. Overall, this was an enjoyable read, and I look forward to reading the rest of this series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shala Howell

    I admit it. I enjoy watching Nathan Fillion. I enjoyed watching Firefly more intensely than Castle, but I’m happy that Castle exists because I believe strongly in this man’s right to have a steady acting job so that I can enjoy a steady diet of his roguish sense of humor. As a mostly regular Castle watcher, I noticed a smudge in the line of reality when those Nikki Heat books that Nathan Fillion’s character writes on the show suddenly starting popping up in my local bookstore. I resisted buying t I admit it. I enjoy watching Nathan Fillion. I enjoyed watching Firefly more intensely than Castle, but I’m happy that Castle exists because I believe strongly in this man’s right to have a steady acting job so that I can enjoy a steady diet of his roguish sense of humor. As a mostly regular Castle watcher, I noticed a smudge in the line of reality when those Nikki Heat books that Nathan Fillion’s character writes on the show suddenly starting popping up in my local bookstore. I resisted buying them for at least a year, afraid that the fairly clever merchandising tie-in masked some not so clever writing. But last week I gave in. I blame Nathan Fillion’s smile. You know the one in the author photo that seems to say, “Yes, I know this whole thing is a little silly, but don’t you really think it’s kind of fun anyway?” And you know, I think it’s fair to say that if you enjoy watching Castle, you’ll enjoy these books. Reading Naked Heat is like reading an episode of the show. It’s really quite remarkable. Kudos to the author for that, whoever he or she may be. (Review originally posted on my blog, bostonwriters.wordpress.com.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    B

    It sounds kind of stupid in this day and age, but this book was written with a kind of sexist mentality. Usually the sex of the (anonymous) author plays only a little into the writing, and rarely detracts from the story, but this whole thing is a bad joke. The story is supposed to be about this awesome female detective, but it undermines that whole idea repeatedly. It makes multiple commentary within the writing of the character being "balsy" as a positive, (obviously male, and as positive ass It sounds kind of stupid in this day and age, but this book was written with a kind of sexist mentality. Usually the sex of the (anonymous) author plays only a little into the writing, and rarely detracts from the story, but this whole thing is a bad joke. The story is supposed to be about this awesome female detective, but it undermines that whole idea repeatedly. It makes multiple commentary within the writing of the character being "balsy" as a positive, (obviously male, and as positive association,) or other characters having "brass balls" (seen by many males as a positive) but when a female reference is used, it is always negative. For example, when interrogating a pair of suspects, the detective was trying to find "the bitch" (obviously negative female connotation) among the two males because "You can always break the bitch(p.80)" (negative female connotation, weakness, dominated). It seems that any reference to her being gutsy were male references, and MANY of the words or terms choosen to describe negative things were female. It was so bad that it actually stood out. (It's much like a males version of a female drawn in a comic book. She may be a great character, but she'll always be ridiculously busty with a "live at the superhero gym" figure. Lame.) It is not cleverly or covertly but rather overtly sexual, also of little importance to the story. Lastly, and most strangely, there are grammatical mistakes within the text itself, not just in the use of the spoken text for character coloring. Quite a few of them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie and Louis Rigod

    This second book was written with more confidence than the first. The characters are filling out with more dimension and make my enjoyment of the series even more. The mystery and murders were well crafted and interesting and I loved the ending! When is Book 3 coming out?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andy Angel

    This was a strange one that I'm still trying to get my head around. The general idea is that the book is written by Richard Castle, who is one of the leads in the tv cop show Castle. In the show Castle is an author who is shadowing a police officer (Kate Becket) to see how she works and to use her for the basis of the cop in his novels (Nikki Heat). Together they solve crimes and eventually become an item. So, this story follows the same format only here the guy following Nikki Heat is Jamesone R This was a strange one that I'm still trying to get my head around. The general idea is that the book is written by Richard Castle, who is one of the leads in the tv cop show Castle. In the show Castle is an author who is shadowing a police officer (Kate Becket) to see how she works and to use her for the basis of the cop in his novels (Nikki Heat). Together they solve crimes and eventually become an item. So, this story follows the same format only here the guy following Nikki Heat is Jamesone Rook (and I'm slightly ashamed to say it took me too long to put Castle/Took together for the pun that it is). And there in lies the problem for me, although the story was enjoyable enough it felt like an episode of Castle but with everyone having different names. As for the story itself, well, as I say, I quite enjoyed it. A gossip columnist is found murdered just as she was about to hand over her 'block buster' manuscript (that will put someone in a whole heap of trouble). There are a whole heap of celebrity types who could be tied in to the case and it's up to Heat and Castle, sorry Rook, and co. to solve the case and try not to get in too many scrapes. Well enough written and keeps you guessing for a good while. One thing I did like (just because it made me chuckle) - in the series, Castle, the character of Castle is played by Nathan Fillon and in this story there is a passing mention of two police officers called Malcolm and Reynolds. In Fillon's other Big Show, Firefly, he plays the character of... Wait for it... Malcolm Reynolds.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Detective Nikki is on the trail of a murdered, mud-slinging socialite who has more enemies than New York has panhandlers. Among the suspects are a top notch Yankee pitcher, a rock star and his girlfriend, a gourmet chef, and the like. The writing was great, from the characters to the continuity throughout the story, with her writing friend from the first novel, Rook, back for more quips.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Another installment for fans of the ABC TV show "Castle", "Naked Heat" continues the adventures of NYPD detective Nikki Heat (based on the TV show character "Kate Beckett") about 6 months after "Heat Wave". Although my primary complaint about "Heat Wave" (the constant use of Nikki Heat's full name throughout the narrative) is still partly there, this book is superior to its predecessor in several ways. First off, there is more to the 2nd novel. Where the first book felt like you were reading a lo Another installment for fans of the ABC TV show "Castle", "Naked Heat" continues the adventures of NYPD detective Nikki Heat (based on the TV show character "Kate Beckett") about 6 months after "Heat Wave". Although my primary complaint about "Heat Wave" (the constant use of Nikki Heat's full name throughout the narrative) is still partly there, this book is superior to its predecessor in several ways. First off, there is more to the 2nd novel. Where the first book felt like you were reading a long episode (maybe two-parter) of "Castle", this second book is more epic in scale: more characters (both victims and suspects), more tense situations, and more character development. These are all done well too - it is not merely another example of "the sequel has to be bigger". It is a product of both better writing as well as the sequel's "little exposition needed" advantage over the first. Secondly, the book makes more implied references to the TV show. In fact, it can become a bit of a game to try to figure out in which episode it was that Rick Castle got his inspiration for the next bit of the story. This makes the tie-in to the show that much more enjoyable for fans of the show: Easter eggs abound! Finally, the romance angle is played better than in the original. Whereas the first book handled romance like a tequila-laced sledge hammer, the follow-up becomes more about the thrill of the chase, the questions and doubts about feelings and emotions, as well as rivalries and communication issues. All in all, fans of the show will really appreciate the additional effort that went into this book. It's not Shakespeare, Austen, or Tolkien, but it's way better than your average "bodice ripper" (spoiler?).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nola Lorraine

    3.5 stars. This is the second in the Detective Nikki Heat series that tie in with the TV series Castle. When ruthless gossip columnist Cassidy Towne is murdered, there's no shortage of suspects. But does her murder have anything to do with the deaths of a limo driver and a concierge? And what do a pop star and a baseball star have to do with any of this, not to mention a coyote and a Texan with a penchant for torturing his victims first? The answer may lie with the missing tell-all manuscript sh 3.5 stars. This is the second in the Detective Nikki Heat series that tie in with the TV series Castle. When ruthless gossip columnist Cassidy Towne is murdered, there's no shortage of suspects. But does her murder have anything to do with the deaths of a limo driver and a concierge? And what do a pop star and a baseball star have to do with any of this, not to mention a coyote and a Texan with a penchant for torturing his victims first? The answer may lie with the missing tell-all manuscript she was working on, but where is it? And why did she withhold the final chapter from her publisher? This is an entertaining, solid police procedural that once again sees Detective Nikki Heat and journalist Jamieson Rook join forces to solve the crime. There's lots of snappy banter and good plotting. However, the omniscient POV was a bit distant for me. I'm not sure now if it was all the way through. Maybe some of it was third-person POV with head-hopping. But once I started noticing it, it did explain why some of the action/suspense scenes didn't seem as gripping as they could have been. I felt I was a bit too far removed. This is a shame because the author is great at dialogue and interesting metaphors and other turns of phrase. It didn't grab me quite as much as the first book in the series, but I'm not sure if that was because the case itself wasn't as interesting to me or if some of the novelty had rubbed off. I didn't really feel for the victim, so maybe I wasn't as invested in finding her murderer. However, it was an entertaining read overall and I'll probably read more in the series. If you like the TV series Castle, you'll like the parallels with this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

    My wife and I are fans of Castle on ABC TV. I bought and read "Heat Wave", the first of the two Richard Castle books, as soon as it was published. Mostly I read ebooks on the Kindle. To say I bought the Castle books hardcover means something, I think. As exciting as these thrillers are, I perked up when I found a professional writing lesson. I'm in week 13 of a 52-week online writing course from Publication Coach Daphne Gray-Grant. If you skip to Chapter 17 of "Heat Wave", you'll find a lesson in My wife and I are fans of Castle on ABC TV. I bought and read "Heat Wave", the first of the two Richard Castle books, as soon as it was published. Mostly I read ebooks on the Kindle. To say I bought the Castle books hardcover means something, I think. As exciting as these thrillers are, I perked up when I found a professional writing lesson. I'm in week 13 of a 52-week online writing course from Publication Coach Daphne Gray-Grant. If you skip to Chapter 17 of "Heat Wave", you'll find a lesson in fiction writing laid out for you. Here's how Jameson Rook writes. "Rook knew the stories were in the experience, not on the Internet. He had a vivid memory and a notes system that delivered him back into the moment every time ... his Moleskin bookmark... a lined page of quotes remembered and details observed. "He worked rapidly from beginning to end of the articles as he wrote, drafting at first-impression speed, leaving gaps and reserving the fine work to be done later... He made numerous passes like that but always continuously, without any backtracking, for a sense of flow. He wrote as if he were the reader... Rook was a journalist..." I wondered as I read each of these books who the real author is. There is a brief autobiographical profile of the author if your read between the lines. My guess it's a woman writing as a man might write. Undoubtedly a popular fiction writer who has at least two current series running with unique pseudonyms. I could do a full blog post about readers' and writers' attitudes about fiction vs non-fiction. The controversy of preference has become cliche on TV, in movie scripts, and in printed news media. Don't let bias blind you to the possibility of finding valuable research while reading entertainment fiction.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Fen

    I'm amazed at how good these books have been and really quite curious about the ghostwriter. Whoever is in charge of these things has certainly come up with an excellent way to do tie-in novels to the TV show... by making it the fictional creation of a fictional character. You've got most of the characters from the show present (I do miss Alexis in these books), with only slight alterations to make them different from the "real people" they represent... the voices for each are spot on and the pl I'm amazed at how good these books have been and really quite curious about the ghostwriter. Whoever is in charge of these things has certainly come up with an excellent way to do tie-in novels to the TV show... by making it the fictional creation of a fictional character. You've got most of the characters from the show present (I do miss Alexis in these books), with only slight alterations to make them different from the "real people" they represent... the voices for each are spot on and the plot uses elements from episodes in the last season of the show, as if those events have really been gleaned for the plot by an author who experienced them (and then given new twists so that even if you watched the show, you won't necessarily guess where things are going). Wonderfully done! And just to give it that added edge of surreality, there's the Acknowledgments in the back... a combination of thanks from the fictional author to the fictional people who helped him "create" his work intermingled with thanks to the very real people who help bring the show to life. Love it and can't wait for the next book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    It's not quite as delightful as the last novel novel, but this new production of "Richard Castle" or whoever is writing for him is still pretty darn fun. If it wasn't attached to a television show, this would be, at best, a mid-level airplane read -- the kind of thing it would be fine to pass two hours with in an enclosed space that offers limited options. The attachment to the TV show "Castle," though, makes it an extension of a world I'm already amused by, though not exactly in a fan-fiction t It's not quite as delightful as the last novel novel, but this new production of "Richard Castle" or whoever is writing for him is still pretty darn fun. If it wasn't attached to a television show, this would be, at best, a mid-level airplane read -- the kind of thing it would be fine to pass two hours with in an enclosed space that offers limited options. The attachment to the TV show "Castle," though, makes it an extension of a world I'm already amused by, though not exactly in a fan-fiction type way. Half the fun of this book is reading between the lines to what Castle (the fictional writer) is saying about his real life (which is, of course, not at all real). The experience is still vertiginous, offering layer upon layer of fun. It's like spending each week spying on a writer's life, and then getting to see the product of it, once a year -- and yet none of that is true. I liked it. It was a funny, flirty book, much lighter than the usual mystery genre and much more willing to play with its characters -- both into and against stereotype.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I wish they would write these with less crap. The stories are fun and I love the show. Why can't the books be as clean as the show?! I wish they would write these with less crap. The stories are fun and I love the show. Why can't the books be as clean as the show?!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    This is incredibly lame compared to the tv series of all things. Usually, but not always its the other way around. I commend the tv writers and condem this novel. Very lame. 1 of 10 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marie Christensen

    I liked this book....didn’t realize it was book 2 though....not sure if it matters or not,but I’ll be reading the rest of the series

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    Naked Heat is book 2 in the Nikki Heat series of books. The series was published as to tie-in with the TV series Castle in which Richard Castle, an author, first comes in contact with Detective Kate Beckett when a copycat killer bases his crimes on the former’s books, and decides to base his next series on her. The books were actually written by screenwriter Tom Straw, but published under Castle’s name and feature his picture as author. Since I enjoyed the series so much, the initial seasons par Naked Heat is book 2 in the Nikki Heat series of books. The series was published as to tie-in with the TV series Castle in which Richard Castle, an author, first comes in contact with Detective Kate Beckett when a copycat killer bases his crimes on the former’s books, and decides to base his next series on her. The books were actually written by screenwriter Tom Straw, but published under Castle’s name and feature his picture as author. Since I enjoyed the series so much, the initial seasons particularly, I had been meaning to give the books a try as well, and now I finally read this one which I’d bought last year. This one opens with Nikki Heat on her way to a crime scene when she encounters something rather unusual. At the crime scene, she finds a victim who used to drive a truck delivering vegetables and fruit with no apparent reason why anyone would kill him. Almost before finishing with that scene, she is called to a second crime scene. Here the victim is a gossip columnist, Cassidy Towne and the person that reporter the murder is journalist Jameson Rook, who was working on a story on her. Needless to say, Towne was no pleasant person and has an endless list of ‘victims’ who’d wish her dead. We follow Rook and Heat and officers Riley and Ochoa as they interview suspects and try to find out which of them actually did her in. As Towne was a celebrity columnist, this is the world they find themselves navigating—not just a singer and a sportsman but also a politician whose career Towne cut short, and Rook’s connections help get them around a bit. On the personal front, Rook and Heat have broken up since the article he was shadowing her team for ended up focusing on her rather than the team as a whole which left them all angry, and Nikki feeling wronged. Working with Nikki again on this case, Rook hopes to patch things up with her and the others, but Nikki’s old boyfriend enters the scene complicating things a little. This is an enjoyable read that plays out more or less like any episode of the show Castle. The characters are basically versions of those—Castle is Rook, Beckett is Heat, Ryan is Riley, Esposito is Ochoa, and medical examiner Lanie is Lauren, while Castle’s mother Martha becomes Margaret though his daughter is not in the book (nor mentioned). The mystery is fairly complicated with plenty of suspects (all with strong enough motives) and some red herrings. We also learn something interesting about Rook; while Heat’s mother’s murder is mentioned but there are no developments in that direction. The only complaint if any I had was that may be it felt was a touch too long; but as someone who really enjoyed the show, I thought this was a great deal of fun.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Finn

    New case with a lot more suspects and a lot more different characters, but the book never looses the proverbial plot. It's another Nikki Heat/Jameson Rook case which you just can't stop reading. =D It delivers on all fronts. New case with a lot more suspects and a lot more different characters, but the book never looses the proverbial plot. It's another Nikki Heat/Jameson Rook case which you just can't stop reading. =D It delivers on all fronts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This review originally posted here. Here’s the thing: I don’t read mysteries. To me, mysteries usually feel contrived, and I don’t really like to feel as though a writer is holding my head and telling me “ssh, not yet.” Usually, I feel like the narrator or writer is keeping things from me, because the characters are working through the mystery as I am. But that doesn’t mean the author doesn’t know the ending; of course, the writer knows! But I make an exception to my “no mysteries” library by read This review originally posted here. Here’s the thing: I don’t read mysteries. To me, mysteries usually feel contrived, and I don’t really like to feel as though a writer is holding my head and telling me “ssh, not yet.” Usually, I feel like the narrator or writer is keeping things from me, because the characters are working through the mystery as I am. But that doesn’t mean the author doesn’t know the ending; of course, the writer knows! But I make an exception to my “no mysteries” library by reading books by Richard Castle. Who is Richard Castle? Well, he’s a fictional author played by Nathan Fillion on ABC’s Monday night TV show “Castle.” So what ABC has done is release now two books “written” by Castle that are also featured on the show. See, Castle shadows Kate Beckett, a kick-ass homicide detective in New York City. So she’s the inspiration for his new series about a kick-ass homicide detective in NYC — Nikki Heat. Nikki Heat is Kate Beckett. And Nikki Heat is plagued by Jameson Rook, a journalist who writes a tell-all about Nikki, and he is obviously Castle’s counterpart. The book reads like an episode of “Castle,” which is what I love about it. The biggest difference between the Nikki Heat books and “Castle” is that Nikki and Jameson have sex. Naked Heat centers around the murder of an infamous gossip columnist. She was killed by being stabbed in the back. Ironic, no? The story circles several famous people — a Yankees pitcher, a pop star, and the recent apparent accidental overdose of a great actor a la Heath Ledger (Castle’s comparison, not mine). The story did keep me guessing even if the writing wasn’t that great. It was the writing of a genre mystery, and I just can’t help but wonder: who actually writes the Richard Castle books? A fun tidbit — I don’t remember the first book as well as I wish I did, but the opening pages of Naked Heat take place on the Upper West Side of NYC. In fact, on the first page, Nikki Heat drives past a restaurant I was physically at last weekend! Her precinct is on 82nd on the UWS. I live on the UWS now, and I’m sure that I’m recognizing streets and places more now because I live her. I wouldn’t have known Amsterdam or 83rd St. or anything a year ago, prior to living in New York City myself. And I love how “Richard Castle” in his acknowledgments to Naked Heat, thanks “Nathan, Stana, Seamus, Jon, Ruben, Molly, Susan, and Tamala.” If you’re not a “Castle” watcher, here’s a hint: those are the names of the entire cast of the TV show!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rayment

    Mini Book Review: I have to read these since I am a huge Castle fan, I just can't help myself. I love the fact that they have a picture of Nathan Fillion on the back cover as the author, makes me giggle. I know they are gimmicky and the writing not the best, but I still really enjoy them. This story was no exception. It's fast paced and filled with fun TV style dialogue. The characters are loosely based on the actual characters on the show which makes it lots of fun. Also some of the plot is tak Mini Book Review: I have to read these since I am a huge Castle fan, I just can't help myself. I love the fact that they have a picture of Nathan Fillion on the back cover as the author, makes me giggle. I know they are gimmicky and the writing not the best, but I still really enjoy them. This story was no exception. It's fast paced and filled with fun TV style dialogue. The characters are loosely based on the actual characters on the show which makes it lots of fun. Also some of the plot is taken from various episodes of the show and it appeals to my nerdy humour to figure out which one. My only complaint no naughty scenes between Rook and Nikki, that was hilarious to read in the first installment. A perfect book for a day at the beach and a must have for fans of Castle. I have the first book in paperback and will be buying this one as well when it comes out in that format. Hopefully one day I will be able to get Nathan Fillion to sign my copies, and I am still dying to know who ACTUALLY writes them. 3.5 Dewey's I borrowed this from Natasha and didn't have to review (But I will be buying my own copy when it comes out in paperback)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This is a fast, light read, but Nikki Heat and Jameson Rook just aren't as likable as their TV counterparts. The prose is clunky and too full of distracting jargon that interrupts the flow of the story. The mystery is overcomplicated and tedious, partly because so many of the characters (even minor ones) are cut-and-pasted from Castle episodes. Those types of connections were seriously overdone. A few cute callouts to the show would have been fun, but the heavy-handed inclusion of so many refere This is a fast, light read, but Nikki Heat and Jameson Rook just aren't as likable as their TV counterparts. The prose is clunky and too full of distracting jargon that interrupts the flow of the story. The mystery is overcomplicated and tedious, partly because so many of the characters (even minor ones) are cut-and-pasted from Castle episodes. Those types of connections were seriously overdone. A few cute callouts to the show would have been fun, but the heavy-handed inclusion of so many references muddied the waters too much and made the book feel like a retread of things we'd already seen. I love the series and I really want to like these books. But the people behind Naked Heat were clearly more interested in making a tie-in than telling a good story. I'd love to read about these characters in a more original story (and preferably written by someone with a more polished style).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Another enjoyable installment from the fictional author, Richard Castle. I'm not giving it a higher rating because it was too easy to put down in the first half. Also, I realize the fictional character of Rook, although charming, doesn't come across as winsome as Nathan Fillion does as Castle in the TV series. Fillion has a little-boy charm about him that makes the self-centeredness and cluelessness come out all right, even if it earns him an eye-roll. But in print, the same characteristics, clu Another enjoyable installment from the fictional author, Richard Castle. I'm not giving it a higher rating because it was too easy to put down in the first half. Also, I realize the fictional character of Rook, although charming, doesn't come across as winsome as Nathan Fillion does as Castle in the TV series. Fillion has a little-boy charm about him that makes the self-centeredness and cluelessness come out all right, even if it earns him an eye-roll. But in print, the same characteristics, cluelessness, etc., aren't as easy to over look. While I like Rook, I don't like him as much as Castle. Nikki, on the other hand, comes across quite well in print and I like her almost as well as Dec. Beckett. The story reads pretty much like a TV script for the show, which means it's light and fun, but well done and interesting. I'll go on to book 3 of the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chichipio

    Giving it 2 stars feels a bit harsh because I enjoyed it, but I admit that 3 is a little generous compared to the ratings I've been giving lately. So, 2.5? Also, no review for this one other than what I said in the comment section. They're like Castle fan-fiction but written by pros, so there aren't any typos or grammar issues and the plot progresses smoothly. Anyone who likes Castle should find these entertaining, but don't expect having your mind blown away. Giving it 2 stars feels a bit harsh because I enjoyed it, but I admit that 3 is a little generous compared to the ratings I've been giving lately. So, 2.5? Also, no review for this one other than what I said in the comment section. They're like Castle fan-fiction but written by pros, so there aren't any typos or grammar issues and the plot progresses smoothly. Anyone who likes Castle should find these entertaining, but don't expect having your mind blown away.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terence M

    An enjoyable read, pretty much following the theme of book 1, but I think it was a bit convoluted and reasonably predictable. Nothing to get excited about, but I need to refrain from reading/listening to one book by a new author (to me), liking it, and then reading/listening to the next in the series almost immediately. I figure this might be spoiling some future reads for me. A reasonable 3.0 stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Anne Hamilton

    Look is this good writing? Nah not really. But it's fun for anyone who's a fan of Castle. I loved that tv show (though U didn't watch the final series cos I felt it went on too long) but omg it's just so fun to be back in this world. I pretty much just read the dialogue in this but really enjoyed it. Not enough to rate it any higher but yeah. I now wanna rewatch the series ahh Look is this good writing? Nah not really. But it's fun for anyone who's a fan of Castle. I loved that tv show (though U didn't watch the final series cos I felt it went on too long) but omg it's just so fun to be back in this world. I pretty much just read the dialogue in this but really enjoyed it. Not enough to rate it any higher but yeah. I now wanna rewatch the series ahh

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I really wanted to love this book, but if I'm honest, I went in with low expectations. When I first read Heat Wave, my expectations were pretty high. Castle is one of my favourite shows and I could not imagine that the Nikki Heat-series would not meet the standards the TV show set. Sadly, I was wrong. And after I didn't like Heat Wave all that much, I was not motivated to read Naked Heat at all - especially because the teaser sounded terribly boring. The solution? I listened to the audiobook, whi I really wanted to love this book, but if I'm honest, I went in with low expectations. When I first read Heat Wave, my expectations were pretty high. Castle is one of my favourite shows and I could not imagine that the Nikki Heat-series would not meet the standards the TV show set. Sadly, I was wrong. And after I didn't like Heat Wave all that much, I was not motivated to read Naked Heat at all - especially because the teaser sounded terribly boring. The solution? I listened to the audiobook, which was a great choice. I am sure that I would have had to force myself to read the physical book - it was just too boring for me. Sure, there were some action scenes, but the overall case the novel is set around is just not interesting to me. I'll gladly admit that I enjoyed listening to it, though. I appreciate the writing a lot; Richard Castle is portrayed as having a way with words and it's great that they picked a ghost writer who does this character justice. Moreover, I love Castle's characters. They're not really round, but I reckon most readers have watched the show and know the people who inspired Nikki and the others well enough, which is why the author could not actually be bothered to develop them too much. As I said, I did not love Naked Heat. Btw, did I ever mentioned how much I like the titles of these books, though? I love such plays on words. Still, I liked listening to it. I did not have to concentrate on it too much, which is really good since the semester has started and I should really be focusing on uni. Anyway, I will certainly read Frozen Heat - it is the first book in the series whose teaser genuinely sounds thrilling.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    It's been a while since I read any of the Richard Castle books, but I've had a few of them on my TBR cart for a while, and I decided to pick up Naked Heat as an easy read in between some of my other August reads. Naked Heat picks up where Heat Wave left off. I didn't reread Heat Wave before diving into this one, and I didn't feel like I was missing anything even though it's been years since I read Heat Wave. This book was a pleasant read, and it is perfect for fans of the Castle TV show. The stor It's been a while since I read any of the Richard Castle books, but I've had a few of them on my TBR cart for a while, and I decided to pick up Naked Heat as an easy read in between some of my other August reads. Naked Heat picks up where Heat Wave left off. I didn't reread Heat Wave before diving into this one, and I didn't feel like I was missing anything even though it's been years since I read Heat Wave. This book was a pleasant read, and it is perfect for fans of the Castle TV show. The story in Naked Heat parallels the TV series more than I remember the first book doing, and while it was predictable at times, it was still enjoyable.

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