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The final episode in the trilogy that began with the million-copy bestseller MAN AND BOY Ten years on from MAN AND BOY, it is crunch time for Harry… Life is good for Harry Silver. He has a beautiful wife, three wonderful children and a great job as producer of the cult radio show, A Clip Round the Ear. But Harry is about to turn forty and his ex-wife is back in town. Soon it The final episode in the trilogy that began with the million-copy bestseller MAN AND BOY Ten years on from MAN AND BOY, it is crunch time for Harry… Life is good for Harry Silver. He has a beautiful wife, three wonderful children and a great job as producer of the cult radio show, A Clip Round the Ear. But Harry is about to turn forty and his ex-wife is back in town. Soon it could be time to kiss the good life goodbye… When Harry's fifteen-year-old son Pat moves out to live with his mother, the hard times have only just begun. With his son gone, his job at risk and his wife unsettled by the reappearance of her own ex, their dream seems to be falling apart. Into the chaos of Harry Silver's life stroll two old soldiers who fought alongside Harry's late father in The Battle of Monte Cassino in the spring of 1944. Will these two grumpy old men help Harry reclaim his son, his family and his life? And can they show Harry Silver what it really means to be a man? Funny, moving and unforgettable, MEN FROM THE BOYS is a story of how we live now.


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The final episode in the trilogy that began with the million-copy bestseller MAN AND BOY Ten years on from MAN AND BOY, it is crunch time for Harry… Life is good for Harry Silver. He has a beautiful wife, three wonderful children and a great job as producer of the cult radio show, A Clip Round the Ear. But Harry is about to turn forty and his ex-wife is back in town. Soon it The final episode in the trilogy that began with the million-copy bestseller MAN AND BOY Ten years on from MAN AND BOY, it is crunch time for Harry… Life is good for Harry Silver. He has a beautiful wife, three wonderful children and a great job as producer of the cult radio show, A Clip Round the Ear. But Harry is about to turn forty and his ex-wife is back in town. Soon it could be time to kiss the good life goodbye… When Harry's fifteen-year-old son Pat moves out to live with his mother, the hard times have only just begun. With his son gone, his job at risk and his wife unsettled by the reappearance of her own ex, their dream seems to be falling apart. Into the chaos of Harry Silver's life stroll two old soldiers who fought alongside Harry's late father in The Battle of Monte Cassino in the spring of 1944. Will these two grumpy old men help Harry reclaim his son, his family and his life? And can they show Harry Silver what it really means to be a man? Funny, moving and unforgettable, MEN FROM THE BOYS is a story of how we live now.

30 review for Men From The Boys

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    I'm almost certain that I read the first two books in this trilogy. What does it say that I had NO recollection of the characters, and didn't even realize it was part of a series until I saw a review? I thought I really liked Tony Parsons' books, but it turns out that I find them very unmemorable! This one was ok, about the differences between generations. It did state quite a few profound truisms, but on the whole I didn't love the story, and didn't find the ending particularly satisfying. I'm almost certain that I read the first two books in this trilogy. What does it say that I had NO recollection of the characters, and didn't even realize it was part of a series until I saw a review? I thought I really liked Tony Parsons' books, but it turns out that I find them very unmemorable! This one was ok, about the differences between generations. It did state quite a few profound truisms, but on the whole I didn't love the story, and didn't find the ending particularly satisfying.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steve lovell

    This is a novel of old men with steel in their spines, ice at their core, disdain for the soft purgatory of modern life in twenty-first century UK, but tenderness remaining deep down in their souls for those who can touch their hearts. It is a novel of what love has become in this new millennium – a very confusing place to be at the best of times, let alone the worst of times. It is a novel of the ‘Karate Kid’ cliché, and of failing to be alive at a time of the great moments in history where men This is a novel of old men with steel in their spines, ice at their core, disdain for the soft purgatory of modern life in twenty-first century UK, but tenderness remaining deep down in their souls for those who can touch their hearts. It is a novel of what love has become in this new millennium – a very confusing place to be at the best of times, let alone the worst of times. It is a novel of the ‘Karate Kid’ cliché, and of failing to be alive at a time of the great moments in history where men were called on to pay, en masse, the ultimate price to protect the world from evil. This is a novel that ends with ‘A pretty young woman with Melbourne in her voice and sunshine in her hair’ heading off on a ‘flying kangaroo.’ It is a beautiful novel – but ever since Tony Parsons first hit the stands with ‘Man and Boy’ in the dying days of the previous century and captured hearts, one would expect no less. Reflecting his own history in so many ways in his novels, particularly those continuing the story of Harry Silver as he advances through the decades, as this does, Parsons continues to shed gilded light on what it means to be a man in perplexing times. Male ‘baby-boomers’ will never measure up to their fathers who answered the call, who had to contend with the possibility of death just around the corner, but even so, it was all so straight forward back then when England (and our nation) was mono-cultural and people knew their place, the proper way to behave. ‘Life was so much simpler then’. Our Harry in his forties loves his wife and blended family, but all is disrupted by job loss, returning ex-spouse and Elizabeth Montgomery. Plot-wise a few through-lines don’t quite gel, and making a point about reality television through the use of ridiculous names did grate. It remains, though, that there is little else to fault this seamlessly written contribution to a more mature form of ‘lad-lit’. Tissues may be required at the end, indicative of a practitioner who entices the reader really care about his fictional creations. Did I see anything of may own father, who shared a war with the old soldiers, in these pages? I must admit there was very little, but I recall mates of his that were much like Ken Grimwood – damaged in so many ways by the terrors of those great and terrible events. Parsons own father was a war hero, so we know his words come from the heart. His words also spoke to me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Proffitt

    This is a book that was passed onto me by my wife who said “you really must read this”. Fair enough I thought. Why not? What she didn’t tell me was that is the third of a three part series! Mind you, if she hadn’t said that I would never have known, as it is self-contained and does not rely on having read the other two. For some reason I had been expecting a funny story. Not sure why, as none of the sleeve notes said it was, but what I found was a very engaging and touching tale of a man trying d This is a book that was passed onto me by my wife who said “you really must read this”. Fair enough I thought. Why not? What she didn’t tell me was that is the third of a three part series! Mind you, if she hadn’t said that I would never have known, as it is self-contained and does not rely on having read the other two. For some reason I had been expecting a funny story. Not sure why, as none of the sleeve notes said it was, but what I found was a very engaging and touching tale of a man trying desperately to hold onto his family. The central character is Harry Silver, a radio producer who lives in London with his second wife, his son, her daughter and their own daughter. About as complex a modern family as you can get! And on the face of it, life is good for the Silvers, but underneath there are cracks beginning to emerge. As Harry approaches his fortieth birthday, events outside his cosy household bring chaos and frustration into their lives. With the return of his ex-wife and the appearance of two old army comrades of his father’s, Harry’s world begins to change. Every parent will recognise the frustrations and seeming futility of trying to understand and deal with teenagers. And I think most of us have faced the frustration of dealing with elderly friends and relatives who refuse to play by the rules of the modern world – any why should they? In Harry Silver we have a character that most modern men can relate to. Often in the shadow of his strong father, unable to fully understand the world his teenage son and daughter inhabit, he finds himself loosing grip on everything he holds dear. “Men from the Boys” is a touching and, yes, sometimes funny look at the trials and tribulations of 21st century men. I read all 320 pages in just over two days, something I haven’t managed for quite some time, but I couldn’t put the book down. Certainly a welcome change from the more intense books I seem to be reading of late. Thanks to my wife, I have several more Tony Parsons novels waiting for me on the book shelves. I am looking forward to reading them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rhuddem Gwelin

    Now I remember why I don't like Tony Parsons' books. His characters are unlikeable and the story is boring. Some authors are sympathetic to their characters and treat them with warmth, even the minor characters. Parsons doesn't. The book is bitter and mean-spirited. It gets a couple of stars, though, because it's an attempt to look at a valid subject, and it's about London. I'm being generous. Now I remember why I don't like Tony Parsons' books. His characters are unlikeable and the story is boring. Some authors are sympathetic to their characters and treat them with warmth, even the minor characters. Parsons doesn't. The book is bitter and mean-spirited. It gets a couple of stars, though, because it's an attempt to look at a valid subject, and it's about London. I'm being generous.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lucija

    Nicely written, easy-going and unchallenging book alltogether. It is the last book in the trilogy about Harry Silver, where we get to see his life as a father of three, one of whom is a teenager and will put Harry’s parenting skills to a test. However, I liked “Man and Boy” better, since Harry Silver was 10 years younger there and you could understand his insecurities and eagerness for having a settled life and family, just like his parents had. But in this book, those insecurities just got me i Nicely written, easy-going and unchallenging book alltogether. It is the last book in the trilogy about Harry Silver, where we get to see his life as a father of three, one of whom is a teenager and will put Harry’s parenting skills to a test. However, I liked “Man and Boy” better, since Harry Silver was 10 years younger there and you could understand his insecurities and eagerness for having a settled life and family, just like his parents had. But in this book, those insecurities just got me irritated. I hoped he would mature over the time and start to see beyond his own problems. Moreover, the characterization of his ex-wife is something that bothered me in the first book, and it hasn’t changed throughout the whole trilogy. I believe there is more to her than the pure spite and vengeance towards Harry, as it seems while he talks about her. Also, the newly introduced characters of Ken and Singe Rana did not impress me but I don’t think they were a bad addition to the storyline. All in all, this book had some good insights in hardships of parenting, maintaining a steady marriage, succeeding in carrier while trying to find yourself along the way. The quote that stood out to me was: “They say a child needs your love most when he deserves it the least.”

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cathreen Shiucheng

    This is a continuing plot from the two books earlier. Kinda like this book as unlike most fiction novels where sometimes, the books will leave you in awe and then, realizing its just a mere fiction. However, for this novel, it's more related to our lives and makes you realize a certain things in life, like, -do you want to get married, and divorce will be a solution when the marriage ain't working? -will you accept the other half with an extra baggage? -do you want to have your own kids? -what bout This is a continuing plot from the two books earlier. Kinda like this book as unlike most fiction novels where sometimes, the books will leave you in awe and then, realizing its just a mere fiction. However, for this novel, it's more related to our lives and makes you realize a certain things in life, like, -do you want to get married, and divorce will be a solution when the marriage ain't working? -will you accept the other half with an extra baggage? -do you want to have your own kids? -what bout adopting kids who aren't your own blood and flesh? -where will you and what will you do when you are turning old and fragile? This novel really makes you stop and ponder a lil while about life. Midlife crisis, employment and stuff.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sidra

    I won the book from a competition. I haven't read the books earlier form this series, nor the latter ones nor am I going to. The story was good, and the narration fresh. I enjoyed how the writer wrote everything he felt, in simple words. I enjoyed the story of 3 different generations, of the army, of broken families, and of today's youth. I enjoyed the words at the end. I won the book from a competition. I haven't read the books earlier form this series, nor the latter ones nor am I going to. The story was good, and the narration fresh. I enjoyed how the writer wrote everything he felt, in simple words. I enjoyed the story of 3 different generations, of the army, of broken families, and of today's youth. I enjoyed the words at the end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rob Bamforth

    Would have been 4-stars but for the ridiculous story involving the kidnapping of a teenager by two adults - locked in the boot of a car - and made to fight their son. For which, by the way, there were no repercussions. It ruined what was otherwise a very real and in places relatable story. Better than than the second, not as good as the first in the trilogy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marie (UK)

    Parsons has managed to maintain the characterisation and storyline in this series so that this book 3 is every bit as good as the first. There is a gentle underlying humour and a relationship to everyday life which makes the book really enjoyable

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Bradbury-Horton

    I'm a fan of Tony Parsons, and this was confirmed after reading Men From The Boys. What I really enjoy is how he tells a simple story of family life, that many of us lead, bringing warmth, anger, despair and joy to life. I'm a fan of Tony Parsons, and this was confirmed after reading Men From The Boys. What I really enjoy is how he tells a simple story of family life, that many of us lead, bringing warmth, anger, despair and joy to life.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rubina Savage

    What a lovely book. So different from what I usually read, thrillers and detective stories. I've read a lot of Tony Parsons books about Max Wolfe and I love them. This was a surprise and a delight to read. I now have to download the first two in the trilogy which I didn't know about. What a lovely book. So different from what I usually read, thrillers and detective stories. I've read a lot of Tony Parsons books about Max Wolfe and I love them. This was a surprise and a delight to read. I now have to download the first two in the trilogy which I didn't know about.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Hutchinson

    Interesting book about a father’s relationship with his teenage son.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate Chaffe

    Easy read. Does make you want to shout the main character quite alot, he's a bit of a drip. Easy read. Does make you want to shout the main character quite alot, he's a bit of a drip.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alec Downie

    A masterclass in anxiety and not just teen.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James M

    Another pointless sequel to Man and Boy. Harry, Cyd, and Pat are so far from likeable in this, and the plot is thin at best. Also signs that Parsons was well on his way to going full Tory here.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I really liked this series. Not a challenging read, but was really enjoyable. Nice to have a male protagonist for once. Also nice to see a difference to the usual boy-meets-girl set up, this is more about the family dynamics.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    The third and final part of harry and Pats story it was never going to live up to the first two books but its well worth your time and rounds of the trilogy nicely. Harry after many years finally grows up and finds meaning in his life. As always well written and the story just flows from the page you can see that Parsons just loves these two characters he has created. As a final part in a trilogy its the weakest but as a body of work all three books together are outstanding look at fatherhood and The third and final part of harry and Pats story it was never going to live up to the first two books but its well worth your time and rounds of the trilogy nicely. Harry after many years finally grows up and finds meaning in his life. As always well written and the story just flows from the page you can see that Parsons just loves these two characters he has created. As a final part in a trilogy its the weakest but as a body of work all three books together are outstanding look at fatherhood and our modern society. Well worth you time and hard spent cash a trilogy that should not be missed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ain Romeli

    Mid-life crisis, that's what it's about. "They say a child needs your love most when he deserves it the least." I had that quote lingering in my mind for a few good hours after I finished reading Men From The Boys (actually no was thinking about pizzas). If anything, once again Tony Parsons has done a good job in capturing the thoughts of a man in his 40's, which I personally think a lot of people will be able to relate to and not just bounded by age limit or gender. This is a story of a son who Mid-life crisis, that's what it's about. "They say a child needs your love most when he deserves it the least." I had that quote lingering in my mind for a few good hours after I finished reading Men From The Boys (actually no was thinking about pizzas). If anything, once again Tony Parsons has done a good job in capturing the thoughts of a man in his 40's, which I personally think a lot of people will be able to relate to and not just bounded by age limit or gender. This is a story of a son who tried to find his father in the midst of emotional blockage which stems from years of fighting grueling wars. I guess opening yourself up to love and beloved is not easy when you have spent years toughening up your physical to not be affected or be made vulnerable by emotions. The son grew up to find himself lurking in the shadow of his father's acquaintances, trying to find his long gone father. I think this issue is more prevalent in his first book of the series, The Man and The Boys (which I haven't read actually) but in this particular book, you could see how it affects Harry as he goes through fatherhood. It is also a story of how love, as cliche as it sounds, knows no boundaries as Harry shows unconditional love to all of his children, even Peggy. Though the blood always wins, he does not let it set a defining bar in his life. I also like how the circumstances are (most of the times) grounded in the book. As in, when it comes to the matter of love, as abstract as the definition is, so does the perseverance of it. Especially after years of living together, one might find himself/herself to be dumbfounded by uncertainties from the fights, and the misunderstandings. I think this is a fear that everyone would have in their mind. What if the love dies out? What if you find yourself to live in happiness conditioned by habits rather than enjoying it as it is? What if you get tired of the romance? Dun dun dun. Hence, it is important to cherish love as it is, not because of the privileges of emotional comfort that comes along with the relationship. If love really is subjective, then really, it is up to you on how would you define it. If you manoeuvre your relationship on a checklist of an unbending rules, it might not be able to hold it up for a long time. But if you can learn to always love the simple things and find perfection in them, you can learn to look past trivial characteristics, then you can certainly find a way to love again and again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Having really enjoyed Man and Boy and Man and Wife, I expected a lot from this third part to the Harry Silver trilogy. And as a page-turner, it delivered; I read it in about three sittings. Yet, at the same time, I can't help feeling slightly disappointed. The old fire seems to have gone out; maybe it was Harry's fecklessness that made him more interesting, but the calmer, 40-year-old Harry of this final episode seems a different animal. There's enough of the old Pat to keep you interested in his Having really enjoyed Man and Boy and Man and Wife, I expected a lot from this third part to the Harry Silver trilogy. And as a page-turner, it delivered; I read it in about three sittings. Yet, at the same time, I can't help feeling slightly disappointed. The old fire seems to have gone out; maybe it was Harry's fecklessness that made him more interesting, but the calmer, 40-year-old Harry of this final episode seems a different animal. There's enough of the old Pat to keep you interested in his welfare despite his morphing into a vaguely stroppy teenager, and Gina seems to drift in and out of the narrative without much purpose. The Ken/Singe Rana pairing was more interesting, recalling my own grandfather's few tales of his experiences at Monte Cassino during WW2 - if half of the stories told by Singe Rana are true, it wouldn't surprise me that my grandfather didn't mention such events himself. So, Men from the Boys delivered in places and under-delivered in places. I enjoyed it - and would recommend Harry Silver fans to read it - but I can't help feeling that it could have been so much more. Still, the fact that my copy was personally signed for me by Tony Parsons at the Hay Festival is something!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Baljit

    In this book, the final of the trilogy, Harry Silver forms un unlikely frienship with 2 retired commandos who had served with his late father. Thru his association with them he wraggles with issues he had with his father. Reflective of the times we live in, households no longer consist of parents and kids, with visits to grandparents, aunts and uncles. Harry copes with his wife, wife's ex, step-daugther,his teenage son,Pat, and his daughter fom this marriage. The order is his life is thrown assu In this book, the final of the trilogy, Harry Silver forms un unlikely frienship with 2 retired commandos who had served with his late father. Thru his association with them he wraggles with issues he had with his father. Reflective of the times we live in, households no longer consist of parents and kids, with visits to grandparents, aunts and uncles. Harry copes with his wife, wife's ex, step-daugther,his teenage son,Pat, and his daughter fom this marriage. The order is his life is thrown assunder when his ex-wife returns to London and Pat chooses to live with his mother. harry feels abandoned and this strains his relationship with his son. his feelings of insecurities are compounded when he loses his job, and he suspects his wife of cheating on him. While Parsons does deliver the turmoil and angst of some of the characters in this story, there were certain areas that were rather foggy. of the trilogy, i liked the 1st novel best.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hanih

    This novel is the first Tony Parson's that I read. It's actually the third installment of the trilogy, the previous two are Man and Boy, and Man and Wife. As I hadn't yet read the other two, so my review is based solely on the one book that I'd read. The story is about Harry Silver who was a single parent who had remarried and live with three children. The plots of the story mainly involves Harry's relationship with his ex-wife concerning their matters and their son, Harry's relationship with his This novel is the first Tony Parson's that I read. It's actually the third installment of the trilogy, the previous two are Man and Boy, and Man and Wife. As I hadn't yet read the other two, so my review is based solely on the one book that I'd read. The story is about Harry Silver who was a single parent who had remarried and live with three children. The plots of the story mainly involves Harry's relationship with his ex-wife concerning their matters and their son, Harry's relationship with his wife, Harry's struggle with the growth of his son, and also Harry's relationship with the friends of his late father, apart from Harry's daily job at a broadcasting company. The story is easily relatable or connectable with the readers as the problems that the characters endured are mostly problems that people had everyday. I' d say, it's a real-life fiction. The writing style is good & the level of the language used is grea

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Jalfon

    this is the third in a trilogy although I never felt that I had missed out on previous events. On the front cover, the Guardian is quoted as saying it's the best book he's written by far, so maybe I got the best to read first. The book chronicles the mess of modern family life which is too often following divorce, abandonment, parental distance and strong feelings of bitterness and loss that don't die even after years. It is quite depressing actually and the protagonist is sympathetic but still this is the third in a trilogy although I never felt that I had missed out on previous events. On the front cover, the Guardian is quoted as saying it's the best book he's written by far, so maybe I got the best to read first. The book chronicles the mess of modern family life which is too often following divorce, abandonment, parental distance and strong feelings of bitterness and loss that don't die even after years. It is quite depressing actually and the protagonist is sympathetic but still not always the most lovable character - which is great in my opinion because he comes across as so real, faults and all and there is a lot of honesty since it is written in the first person. The ending is optimistic and shows how people can grow and behave better and shift their priorities to what is important in life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Larter

    I am very much a fan of Tony Parsons and the way he writes. It is no secret that I count One for My Baby as one of my absolute favourite books. Men from the Boys is the third and final installment in the Harry Silver series. Harry Silver is a single dad and the trilogy is basically dedicated to the journey he faces as he raises his son. The first two books meant a lot to me personally. The first especially helped me to consider what my own ex was going through when faced with the inevitability o I am very much a fan of Tony Parsons and the way he writes. It is no secret that I count One for My Baby as one of my absolute favourite books. Men from the Boys is the third and final installment in the Harry Silver series. Harry Silver is a single dad and the trilogy is basically dedicated to the journey he faces as he raises his son. The first two books meant a lot to me personally. The first especially helped me to consider what my own ex was going through when faced with the inevitability of not being a daily part of his own child's life. I loved getting the male perspective on a lot of ordinary things. I didn't really relate to the this particular book at all though. Most likely because I do have a teenager to deal with yet. I struggled to get into it at first but I did enjoy it in the end. It's definitely a must-read if you've read the other two.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    Men from the Boys by Tony Parsons is not his best. The angry young man who I first met in the pages of the NME as the punk era exploded has certainly turned into a heck of a writer. He has produced some of the most sensitively crafted books of the age. But the first two in this trilogy were better. Here he is, I guess, writing about a more complex time in life. And the book doesn't flow in the same way as the others. The central theme - involving friends of his father - didn't work for me. But i Men from the Boys by Tony Parsons is not his best. The angry young man who I first met in the pages of the NME as the punk era exploded has certainly turned into a heck of a writer. He has produced some of the most sensitively crafted books of the age. But the first two in this trilogy were better. Here he is, I guess, writing about a more complex time in life. And the book doesn't flow in the same way as the others. The central theme - involving friends of his father - didn't work for me. But it's still worth the read. He addresses 21st century father issues better than any other current author I can think of. Its all here; unemployment; children going off the rails; dealing with ex wives; children not going off the rails; keeping new wife sweet; friendship; thugs etc etc. Plus, there are still those wonderful laugh out loud moments (I loved the shark). Bring on his next.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lazar Jovanović

    What a brilliant conclusion to the amazing trilogy. You just can not miss with Parsons. This man is quite an artist when it comes to making extraordinary stories out of ordinary lives. In fact, he can show you how extraordinary every life actually is. His rich and turbulent life reflects widely onto his lines, making his work a whole lot more worth reading. He can read family relations and a man`s brain like no other male author before. He shows you the emotions the way they are, without addition What a brilliant conclusion to the amazing trilogy. You just can not miss with Parsons. This man is quite an artist when it comes to making extraordinary stories out of ordinary lives. In fact, he can show you how extraordinary every life actually is. His rich and turbulent life reflects widely onto his lines, making his work a whole lot more worth reading. He can read family relations and a man`s brain like no other male author before. He shows you the emotions the way they are, without additional embellishment, taken through everyday events. His easy, non-tyring writing style gives you no less to think about than the other philosophical novels. All in all... an outstanding ending of a novel series. I am definitely looking forward to reading more of him. And an easy five-star grade for this one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Meirav Berale

    *CONTAINS SPOILERS* I liked the first two in this trilogy, but this one left me feeling rather meh. In the first two I actually liked the guy (the main character, also the narrator) but in this one I ended up feeling less and less sympathy and more and more of a desire to give him a good kicking and tell him to stop being such a wimp. One of the threads in the story is about his son learning to be a man and stand up for himself, while Harry continues to resemble a doormat for his wife to step on. *CONTAINS SPOILERS* I liked the first two in this trilogy, but this one left me feeling rather meh. In the first two I actually liked the guy (the main character, also the narrator) but in this one I ended up feeling less and less sympathy and more and more of a desire to give him a good kicking and tell him to stop being such a wimp. One of the threads in the story is about his son learning to be a man and stand up for himself, while Harry continues to resemble a doormat for his wife to step on. She's treating him as though he's worthless, and his reaction is totally passive, as though that's what he deserves. She gets up and leaves, and he's still passive. She comes back and... yeah, he's still passive :/ Also, I didn't feel there was anything there to make sense of why she left and, even more so, of why she came back.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alison Evans

    Harry Silver has a wife and three children and produces a radio show. However, he and his wife both have exes, who are the parents of the older two children. So life is fairly complicated. When his ex wife returns from abroad, their teenaged son moves in with her. His wife seems to be spending more time with her ex, and his job is looking more and more at risk. Then two old soldiers turn up, who fought with his father in WW2 and he finds himself ferrying one of them to and from hospital. Can the Harry Silver has a wife and three children and produces a radio show. However, he and his wife both have exes, who are the parents of the older two children. So life is fairly complicated. When his ex wife returns from abroad, their teenaged son moves in with her. His wife seems to be spending more time with her ex, and his job is looking more and more at risk. Then two old soldiers turn up, who fought with his father in WW2 and he finds himself ferrying one of them to and from hospital. Can these old soldiers teach him anything about relationships, and help him repair the ones with his various family members? I haven't read the earlier books about Harry Silver, so clearly there are gaps in my knowledge of what went on before, but that doesn't seem to matter. It's an easy read, but not gripping.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scotchneat

    Like many a Tony Parsons book, there is an easy likeability and light but insightful characterizations. This is the third book in the trilogy that started with Man and Boy. By now, Harry Silver is doing well with the radio show. But his ex-wife is back in town and his eldest son Pat can't resist wanting to know more about her, and eventually, leaves to live with her. At the same time, Harry meets up with two old turnips who fought with his father in the war. Across these three generations of men, Like many a Tony Parsons book, there is an easy likeability and light but insightful characterizations. This is the third book in the trilogy that started with Man and Boy. By now, Harry Silver is doing well with the radio show. But his ex-wife is back in town and his eldest son Pat can't resist wanting to know more about her, and eventually, leaves to live with her. At the same time, Harry meets up with two old turnips who fought with his father in the war. Across these three generations of men, there are some ways that they can reach an understanding.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allan

    So, 10 years+ on from Man and Boy.....and whilst I have read other Tony Parsons books in the meantime, this reminds me of why I enjoyed him first time around. Modern, witty, but above all else he gets inside men and how they tick, not afraid to explore the emotional side. Similar to Nick Hornby but more streetwise. It's a book that spans the whole generational spectrum, as well as dealing with the insecurities and complexities of modern family life.....and this book goes down as the first one I So, 10 years+ on from Man and Boy.....and whilst I have read other Tony Parsons books in the meantime, this reminds me of why I enjoyed him first time around. Modern, witty, but above all else he gets inside men and how they tick, not afraid to explore the emotional side. Similar to Nick Hornby but more streetwise. It's a book that spans the whole generational spectrum, as well as dealing with the insecurities and complexities of modern family life.....and this book goes down as the first one I have borrowed from the library as an ebook .

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lucina Pshegubj

    This book is real life, this book slaps you back into your reality that you might have never noticed before, or even before it's too late. Do not take your life for granted, or your loved ones, your friends, all the blessings! This is a warm, beautiful conclusion for the trilogy, with slightly a different style from the other two books, but the reason behind that is that the characters evolved noticeably, got lost in their lives, twists and turns, and learned and dug their way out. This book is This book is real life, this book slaps you back into your reality that you might have never noticed before, or even before it's too late. Do not take your life for granted, or your loved ones, your friends, all the blessings! This is a warm, beautiful conclusion for the trilogy, with slightly a different style from the other two books, but the reason behind that is that the characters evolved noticeably, got lost in their lives, twists and turns, and learned and dug their way out. This book is recommended.

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