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Self-Defense in Islamic and International Law: Assessing Al-Qaeda and the Invasion of Iraq

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Shah argues that the concept of self-defense in Islamic and International law is compatible. Al-Qaeda’s declaration of Jihad does not meet the Islamic legal test. Similarly, the invasion of Iraq does not meet the international legal test. Dr Shah examines those causes attributed to Islam and non-Islamic causes of terrorism and argues that the theory of ‘reactive terror’ pr Shah argues that the concept of self-defense in Islamic and International law is compatible. Al-Qaeda’s declaration of Jihad does not meet the Islamic legal test. Similarly, the invasion of Iraq does not meet the international legal test. Dr Shah examines those causes attributed to Islam and non-Islamic causes of terrorism and argues that the theory of ‘reactive terror’ provides the most plausible explanation for so-called Islamic terrorism. The nature of conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq is changing and Muslim leaders (not including Al-Qaeda or pro Anglo-American governments) may, by consensus, declare Jihad if the occupying forces do not withdraw. Such declaration would be according to Islamic and international law.   


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Shah argues that the concept of self-defense in Islamic and International law is compatible. Al-Qaeda’s declaration of Jihad does not meet the Islamic legal test. Similarly, the invasion of Iraq does not meet the international legal test. Dr Shah examines those causes attributed to Islam and non-Islamic causes of terrorism and argues that the theory of ‘reactive terror’ pr Shah argues that the concept of self-defense in Islamic and International law is compatible. Al-Qaeda’s declaration of Jihad does not meet the Islamic legal test. Similarly, the invasion of Iraq does not meet the international legal test. Dr Shah examines those causes attributed to Islam and non-Islamic causes of terrorism and argues that the theory of ‘reactive terror’ provides the most plausible explanation for so-called Islamic terrorism. The nature of conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq is changing and Muslim leaders (not including Al-Qaeda or pro Anglo-American governments) may, by consensus, declare Jihad if the occupying forces do not withdraw. Such declaration would be according to Islamic and international law.   

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