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College of the Overwhelmed: The Campus Mental Health Crisis and What to Do about It

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Written for parents, students, college counselors, and administrators, College of the Overwhelmed is a landmark book that explores the stressors that cause so many college students to suffer psychological problems. The book is filled with insights and stories about the current mental health crisis on our nation's campuses and offers: A hands-on guide for helping students ov Written for parents, students, college counselors, and administrators, College of the Overwhelmed is a landmark book that explores the stressors that cause so many college students to suffer psychological problems. The book is filled with insights and stories about the current mental health crisis on our nation's campuses and offers: A hands-on guide for helping students overcome stress and succeed in a college environment. An examination of the effects of such commonplace stress factors such as: identity development, relationships, sexuality, roommate problems, academic pressures, extracurricular demands, parental expectations, and racial and cultural differences that affect self-worth. Personal stories of students under stress and describes how they overcame a variety of problems. The warning signs and symptoms of common problems, including depression, sleep disorders, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, impulsive behaviors, and suicide. Order your copy now.


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Written for parents, students, college counselors, and administrators, College of the Overwhelmed is a landmark book that explores the stressors that cause so many college students to suffer psychological problems. The book is filled with insights and stories about the current mental health crisis on our nation's campuses and offers: A hands-on guide for helping students ov Written for parents, students, college counselors, and administrators, College of the Overwhelmed is a landmark book that explores the stressors that cause so many college students to suffer psychological problems. The book is filled with insights and stories about the current mental health crisis on our nation's campuses and offers: A hands-on guide for helping students overcome stress and succeed in a college environment. An examination of the effects of such commonplace stress factors such as: identity development, relationships, sexuality, roommate problems, academic pressures, extracurricular demands, parental expectations, and racial and cultural differences that affect self-worth. Personal stories of students under stress and describes how they overcame a variety of problems. The warning signs and symptoms of common problems, including depression, sleep disorders, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, impulsive behaviors, and suicide. Order your copy now.

30 review for College of the Overwhelmed: The Campus Mental Health Crisis and What to Do about It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    This book did a sound job of providing an overview to families that might be experiencing mental health related concerns with their child in higher education. Where it lacked was a perspective that could be more relevant to a higher education professional. Though it can be useful to hear what information parents read, it is also valuable for a professional not in the counseling field to glean a deeper understanding of the students they work with. It was an easy read for the most part and I would This book did a sound job of providing an overview to families that might be experiencing mental health related concerns with their child in higher education. Where it lacked was a perspective that could be more relevant to a higher education professional. Though it can be useful to hear what information parents read, it is also valuable for a professional not in the counseling field to glean a deeper understanding of the students they work with. It was an easy read for the most part and I would echo some concerns around anecdotal examples and statements being used which detracted from the overall statement of this text.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This was a helpful read for the field I work in (higher ed administration and student advising). It was written by the head of mental health services at Harvard - someone who has a lot of experience working with students who have been - and are - in pressure-cooker type environments. The experience in the field that Kadison brought to the table definitely added to the book. The book is divided into 2 parts: "The Problem: Why are Some Kids so Unhappy at College" and "The Solution: For Colleges, P This was a helpful read for the field I work in (higher ed administration and student advising). It was written by the head of mental health services at Harvard - someone who has a lot of experience working with students who have been - and are - in pressure-cooker type environments. The experience in the field that Kadison brought to the table definitely added to the book. The book is divided into 2 parts: "The Problem: Why are Some Kids so Unhappy at College" and "The Solution: For Colleges, Parents, and Students." Part 1 was both helpful and interesting - Kadison discussed a lot of developmental issues, particular triggers for mental illness (academic pressure; social issues; financial worries, etc.) Part 2 was unfortunately a little weaker. It contained general suggestions about what institutions might do, though this focused primarily on beefing up mental health services, as opposed to more 'organic' things that can be built into the culture and systems so that students who might be struggling can be connected with resources before moments of crisis. The section within part 2 related to parents (as opposed to colleges) was a bit stronger - I thought (though am not a parent) that the suggestions for communication, and more generally the directive to be engaged and aware of potential issues could certainly be helpful to many. A sad, but interesting related read: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/28/mag...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Raetz

    It was OK. The language is a bit melodramatic and overstated, as if almost all college students are barely holding on and suffering from severe mental illnesses. The first few chapters have very few citations and lots of assertions that need citations, so I was highly critical of that at first but the author provided evidence for his statements after about chapter four. I think this would be a good book for parents of students who are coming to college with an already-diagnosed mental health iss It was OK. The language is a bit melodramatic and overstated, as if almost all college students are barely holding on and suffering from severe mental illnesses. The first few chapters have very few citations and lots of assertions that need citations, so I was highly critical of that at first but the author provided evidence for his statements after about chapter four. I think this would be a good book for parents of students who are coming to college with an already-diagnosed mental health issue or who develop one while at school. There is a chapter dedicated to them that is useful, with step-by-step directions for how to handle a crisis, questions to ask in advance to gauge the available services for the student, and good communication tips. There are some pretty large omissions, however. Saying nothing about how to teach or encourage resilience in your child, for example, is a sizable oversight. The book claims to be aimed at a variety of audiences, including students, parents and administrators. There is very little here for administrators unless you are completely new to the idea that college students sometimes encounter some very serious problems at school. But if you've read the national counseling center directors survey that's done regularly, this offers nothing new. There is almost nothing here for students (one chapter). For parents, yes, this would probably be helpful, but otherwise...meh.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miri

    Generally, I liked this book and found it a really good resource for anyone who's involved in higher education or mental healthcare. (Personally, I'm an undergraduate studying psychology, suffering from depression, and hoping to go into clinical psych, so it's relevant on many grounds.) However, I did find it a bit too "easy" of a read at times, though I suppose that's because it's meant for the average reader, not for people like me who have an academic interest in these issues. It's definitely Generally, I liked this book and found it a really good resource for anyone who's involved in higher education or mental healthcare. (Personally, I'm an undergraduate studying psychology, suffering from depression, and hoping to go into clinical psych, so it's relevant on many grounds.) However, I did find it a bit too "easy" of a read at times, though I suppose that's because it's meant for the average reader, not for people like me who have an academic interest in these issues. It's definitely a good starting point.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joy-Ellen

    A very clear and disturbing view of the stressors that afflict college students and the resultant problems that occur. Full of statistics (from 2004) that every college teacher should know about, how to recognize problems in students, and developing a list for students of campus resources.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jean Marie Angelo

    A very important book about a pervasive issue. We need to help our young people and students accept themselves and work hard without beating themselves up. Mental health is a crisis on campus. Read this book as part of an assignement for University Business.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mab

    Not something I would normally read, but I picked it up for a report I'm writing and it definitly was an eye opener Not something I would normally read, but I picked it up for a report I'm writing and it definitly was an eye opener

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terry Brown

  9. 4 out of 5

    Connie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Green

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  13. 5 out of 5

    bekah

  14. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda Ethier

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nina Castro

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  22. 4 out of 5

    Becca Altimier

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dwroblew

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erin Nunn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sabado

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claire H

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Schiestle

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