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Little Men

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With two sons of her own, and twelve rescued orphan boys filling the informal school at Plumfield, Jo March -- now Jo Bhaer -- couldn't be happier. But despite the warm and affectionate help of the whole March family, boys have a habit of getting into scrapes, and there are plenty of troubles and adventures in store.


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With two sons of her own, and twelve rescued orphan boys filling the informal school at Plumfield, Jo March -- now Jo Bhaer -- couldn't be happier. But despite the warm and affectionate help of the whole March family, boys have a habit of getting into scrapes, and there are plenty of troubles and adventures in store.

30 review for Little Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    Do yourself a favor, o learned reader of mine: if you love Jo from "Little Women" with as much fervor as her progenitor, Bronson Alcott's famed and very original daughter*, then do not read this sequel. Its like the "Go Set a Watchman" of its time. But worse! Uninspired drudge, it makes one compelling argument about why girls lead more substantial, prettier lives than nasty-ass booger-faced boys. * She allows the little ladies-in-a-making cook for & entertain her little men at Plumfield. ENCOURAG Do yourself a favor, o learned reader of mine: if you love Jo from "Little Women" with as much fervor as her progenitor, Bronson Alcott's famed and very original daughter*, then do not read this sequel. Its like the "Go Set a Watchman" of its time. But worse! Uninspired drudge, it makes one compelling argument about why girls lead more substantial, prettier lives than nasty-ass booger-faced boys. * She allows the little ladies-in-a-making cook for & entertain her little men at Plumfield. ENCOURAGES it, voices it. Yuck!! PS: Happy 150th birthday, Little Women!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    There is not another book in all of literature that I hold as dear as this one; I never expect to find another that gives me half as much pleasure. It would be impossible to count how many times I've read it over the years (it has to be dozens and dozens by now), and it remains a locale of constant pilgrimage, as I still return to it at least once a year. I'm always a bit nervous whenever I take it up again that my education of postmodern "isms" will have made me suddenly immune to its charms (a There is not another book in all of literature that I hold as dear as this one; I never expect to find another that gives me half as much pleasure. It would be impossible to count how many times I've read it over the years (it has to be dozens and dozens by now), and it remains a locale of constant pilgrimage, as I still return to it at least once a year. I'm always a bit nervous whenever I take it up again that my education of postmodern "isms" will have made me suddenly immune to its charms (and if that day ever does come, it will honestly make me seriously reconsider a possible future in higher education). Thankfully, from the very first pages, where poor, bereft little Nat Blake arrives at Plumfield and is taken in with open arms by "jolly Mrs. Jo" and ushered into her and her husband's experimental school for boys, it never fails to win me over as quickly and completely as the warm hospitality does the sensitive little homeless boy. At this point I know all the tales—because that's all the book is, really—by heart, and as each chapter presents itself I can't help but smile with pleasure and recognition at the story I know is about to unfold. This time around it particularly struck me how much the stories have become an integral part of me—they're as much my memories as if I had actually experienced them "in the flesh," and if I'm honest I probably treasure them more than I do many many of the "legitimate" memories of my past. And every time I revisit it is striking how much it tells me about who I've become and who I am today—it's easy to comprehend now why the lonely little boy I was was so receptive to its vision of a utopian child society where shy and bookish boys have a place just as legitimate as the others; I can understand my complete identification with the character of Nat, because, that was me at that age. Needless to say, I can't help but chuckle now over Mr. and Mrs. Bhaer's asides to each other about Nat behind closed doors--whether intentionally or not (and I'd probably lean towards the latter), Alcott was implying an awful lot when writing that Mr. Bhaer considered Nat "his 'daughter,'" finding him "as docile and affectionate as a girl." Inevitably, I can't help but wonder if some facets of my own personality are rooted in this initial identification with Nat, if my attraction now to extroverted boys has some basis in Nat's relationship with the exuberant Tommy Bangs; it's kind of odd observing now how the symbiotic Nat/Dan relationship play out through the book, as it so eerily parallels a friendship I had in high school (and my own intense emotional attachment to it). Stepping outside myself for a moment, I will make clear that I don't at all make any great claims for this book—it's no undiscovered masterpiece, or even comes within striking distance of such a characterization. It takes the basic formula of Little Women and, for better or worse, amplifies it in some ways, particularly the moralizing stance it often takes. After the first several chapters where Nat is introduced into Plumfield (serving as a narrative device to introduce the reader to its many characters and establishes the locale), the rest of the book is more or less a ramshackle collection of mostly unrelated anecdotes with a genial "don't kids say/do the darndest things?" tone, with Jo assuming Marmee's place in locating a moral or truth in every turn of events. And that's not at all a knock at all towards Alcott or her literary abilities—as I wrote in my review of Little Women, which I read for the first time last year, reading Alcott's work does make me ponder over the loss of what I called "the unsentimental Postmodern dumping of didactic literature." For my money, the "Damon and Pythias" chapter of the book is about as stellar an example of mixing a moral lesson with suspense as I've ever encountered—even though I know exactly how it all turns out, I still read it with my heart at the back of my throat. What can I say? I love this book completely, unreservedly, and perhaps a bit too nonjudgmentally. So it goes. I will continue to treasure the "Illustrated Junior Library" edition I have always had and read, and with each read its corners grow ever more worn, as much from love as from use. If I am remembering correctly I found this book in an abandoned house on a piece of property my family bought when I was a child, lending my discovery of it a bit of an aura of fate; I had also failed to notice until this time around that this is the 1984 reprint edition, making us exactly the same age. I'm not exactly sure what I think about the idea of fate, but if there is such a thing, then yes, this qualifies just as much as anything possibly could. I'm already looking forward to my next rereading.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Little Men, or Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (Little Women #2), Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott was an American novelist, short story writer and poet better known as the author of the novel Little Women and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Little Men, or Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys, first published in 1871. The novel reprises characters from Little Women and is considered by some the second book in an unofficial Little Women trilogy, which is completed with Alcott's 1886 novel Jo Little Men, or Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (Little Women #2), Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott was an American novelist, short story writer and poet better known as the author of the novel Little Women and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Little Men, or Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys, first published in 1871. The novel reprises characters from Little Women and is considered by some the second book in an unofficial Little Women trilogy, which is completed with Alcott's 1886 novel Jo's Boys, and How They Turned Out: A Sequel to "Little Men". It tells the story of Jo Bhaer and the children at Plumfield Estate School. It was inspired by the death of Alcott's brother-in-law, which reveals itself in one of the last chapters, when a beloved character from Little Women passes away. It has been adapted to a 1934 film, a 1940 film, a television series, and a Japanese animated television series. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1977 میلادی عنوان: م‍ردان‌ ک‍وچ‍ک‌؛ نویسنده: ل‍وئ‍ی‍زا ام‌. آل‍ک‍وت‌؛ مت‍رج‍م ش‍ه‍ی‍ن‌دخ‍ت‌ رئ‍ی‍س‌زاده‌؛ تهران، بنگاه ترجمه و نشر کتاب، 1356، چاپ دیگر تهران، فردوس، جام، 1376؛ در 348ص؛ شابک: 9645509734؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، علمی فرهنگی، 1384؛ در 426ص؛ شابک 9644456416؛ چاپ سوم 1388؛ شابک 9786001210525؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 19میلادی عنوان: م‍ردان‌ ک‍وچ‍ک‌؛ نویسنده: ل‍وئ‍ی‍زا ام‌. آل‍ک‍وت‌؛ مت‍رج‍مها: چیستا یثربی؛ فرشته موثق نژاد؛ ت‍ه‍ران‌ ن‍ام‍ی‍را‏‫، 1383؛ در 477ص؛‬ مردان کوچک دنباله داستان دختران خانواده «مارچ» و فرزندان آنهاست.کتاب مردان کوچک رمانی در حال و هوای زنان کوچک است ولی داستانش به زنان کوچک ربطی ندارد، اما با همان کاراکترها نوشته شده است.«جو» بزرگ شده، با آقای «بائر» ازدواج کرده، و آنها دو پسر کوچک دارند.آنها مدرسه ای شبانه روزی، با چند پسر بچه ی کوچیک را، که بیشترشان بی سرپرست، و نادار هستند را اداره میکنند.«جو» میکوشد با شیطنت پسرها کنار بیاید، و ...؛ ا. شربیانی

  4. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    I probably judge Little Men unfairly because, well, it's just not Little Women. I think I was expecting to much of it. I was also upset by, and this is silly, the fact that Jo turned down Teddy's proposal which then led me to view Jo's and the professor's relationship negatively. So it had a big strike against it to start with for me. Let's be honest, it's hard to top something as good as Little Women. I gave it 3 stars, it probably deserved four.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I adore the book 'Little Women'. I read that when I was much younger. I have read much more widely since then and I have become accustomed to the modern pacing. My point is, I think I would have enjoyed this a little bit more when I was younger. As a modern reader, pacing and stories have changed. This is a fairly outdated story. It was wonderful characters and lovely language, but it comes off, now, as a bit preachy and slow. The author at one point admits that their isn't a whole lot of plot i I adore the book 'Little Women'. I read that when I was much younger. I have read much more widely since then and I have become accustomed to the modern pacing. My point is, I think I would have enjoyed this a little bit more when I was younger. As a modern reader, pacing and stories have changed. This is a fairly outdated story. It was wonderful characters and lovely language, but it comes off, now, as a bit preachy and slow. The author at one point admits that their isn't a whole lot of plot in this story. It was strange. It's just a book about the funny things children do. I did like the story, but it was slow and not a whole lot happens. I also get tired of all the sermons about being wicked and acting good. It isn't that those things are bad, it's just, we get it. Do we have to hear it again, but it was the style of the day. I still adore 'Little Women', even if it's slower paced. This book is OK, but the original is much more fun. Laurie does show up in the story, but I believe that is the only other character besides Jo in the story. Jo is good for the boys and loves them dearly. I'm glad I read this and this wasn't my favorite. I am beginning to think that storytelling has changed so much that these old classics might not be able to survive the new readers, unless people love the words that authors used back then. Still, even for classics, I don't think this is as good. I might go on with this story and I might be done. I don't know. It sure is a long slow book for kids. It's a lot to hang in for.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    Note, July 26, 2019: I've just edited this review to correct a chronological error --thanks for pointing it out, Shannen! Although this is the second novel of Alcott's Little Women trilogy (Part 2 of Little Women, the first novel, was first published separately as Good Wives, but after that, the two were published as a unit), I read it first, and at about the age of eight; it was one of the earliest books I read by myself that I can actually remember. (As I sometimes say, I "cut my teeth" as a re Note, July 26, 2019: I've just edited this review to correct a chronological error --thanks for pointing it out, Shannen! Although this is the second novel of Alcott's Little Women trilogy (Part 2 of Little Women, the first novel, was first published separately as Good Wives, but after that, the two were published as a unit), I read it first, and at about the age of eight; it was one of the earliest books I read by myself that I can actually remember. (As I sometimes say, I "cut my teeth" as a reader on Victorian and Edwardian-era classics.) This review has no spoilers for this book, but the situation it describes inevitably involves some "spoilers" in relation to the preceding book. At the conclusion of the previous tale, Jo March and her German-born suitor, Professor Bhaer, are engaged, and planning to turn Plumfield, the country estate outside of Boston that Jo has inherited from her now-deceased Aunt March, into a boarding school for boys. I don't have Little Women in front of me; and don't perfectly recall the conclusion, but at that time they were planning to marry the following year. The second book simply recounts about six months, from spring to Thanksgiving, in the life of the school --an eventful period that introduces several new pupils-- beginning when their oldest natural son is a bit younger than his twin cousins, who are 10. (That sets up an interesting chronological situation; the internal chronology of the first book, which was published in 1868-69, means that the Bhaers couldn't have married before 1870. This would date the events of Little Men no earlier than 1878, when the cousins, born in 1868, would be about 10; but it was published in 1871. So Alcott was projecting the events, from her own perspective, several years into the future. However, the real-life material and social culture didn't change markedly from 1871 to 1878, so the text as we have it fits pretty well into that chronological setting.) At one point in this book, Alcott writes "...there is no particular plan to this story, except to describe a few scenes in the life at Plumfield for the amusement of certain little persons...." As this suggests, it was written for younger readers; and I think it has a slightly less "grown-up" tone, and deals with somewhat less (or deals somewhat less with) serious and deep themes than the first book. (That may be simply my impression from reading it myself at a very young age, but I don't think so.) It also correctly suggests that there's no very intricate plot here; though the story-line is eventful, the book is somewhat episodic, and more a study of characters than a plot-driven work. It's also an illustration, by rosy example, of the "progressive" educational theories of Alcott's own father, Bronson Alcott, who served as the model for Professor Bhaer; because Plumfield is an unconventional school in a number of ways. Personally, I think a lot of the ideas used here really do have merit. But I'm very skeptical (and already was as a kid) of his rather pacifist approach to discipline --rather than him using the ruler on the hands of offenders, for instance, they have to strike him with the ruler. (Alcott's father actually used that technique.) IMO, it works a lot better here than it probably did in actual practice, and Plumfield is a more successful school than any of Bronson Alcott's real-life educational ventures really were. Unlike Jo, Alcott herself didn't have any actual experience with running a school, and tends to view the kids in the book with somewhat rose-colored spectacles; they don't generally present many serious behavioral issues. (Though to be fair, there are some of these, especially surrounding one of the boys.) All of that said, there's a lot of realistic incident here, and very good development of character; the dozen or so boys at the school, and a couple of girls --Jo's niece Daisy attends Plumfield with her twin brother, John Brooke Jr. (hence "Demijohn," or "Demi" for short), and tomboy Nan winds up here as well-- are all developed as distinct individuals, and drawn as vividly as the adults. (Two of the newcomers, musically-talented Nat and rough-edged Dan, have the most of an actual story arc associated with them, and Dan is the most dynamic character, in the sense of growing and developing in the course of the book). I liked most of the boys, and both of the girls, but Nan was far-and-away my favorite of the latter (I guess I had a thing for tough tomboy types even then, and she earned my admiration early :-) ). Childhood friendship, good life lessons for growing up, adventures, mischief, puppy love --it's all here, and Alcott tells it well. The diction isn't hard to understand, even for kids (at least, motivated kids who like reading), but the story and story-telling isn't so "kiddish" that adults couldn't enjoy it. In fact, I've decided that this would make a good book for Barb and I to read together sometime! (I'd normally recommend that one read Little Women first; but in her case, she saw and liked the movie adaptation of the latter.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Although I have definitely for the most part rather enjoyed Louisa May Alcott's Little Men and do therefore also consider it both a successful sequel to Little Women and also what I would consider an interesting and delightful late 19th century American boarding school story (and yes, a school story that really does descriptively and with much textual pleasure demonstrate how at Jo and Professor Bhaer's Plumfield, not only book learning and lessons are important and cherished, but also how the s Although I have definitely for the most part rather enjoyed Louisa May Alcott's Little Men and do therefore also consider it both a successful sequel to Little Women and also what I would consider an interesting and delightful late 19th century American boarding school story (and yes, a school story that really does descriptively and with much textual pleasure demonstrate how at Jo and Professor Bhaer's Plumfield, not only book learning and lessons are important and cherished, but also how the students are equally and intensely instructed and expected to be physically active, to engage in sports, gardening and the like), I also (and indeed frustratingly) have found that occasionally whilst reading Little Men, I was definitely feeling a just trifle impatient, that I really was wishing Louisa May Alcott would get to the point and move away from being so preachy. For while the majority of the often rather episodic chapters of Little Men certainly are entertaining and engaging enough (even though I sometimes have found Dan's escapades and even his entire story to be a trifle too one-sided and even a bit artificial in scope), there is (at least in my opinion) occasionally just too many doses of morality and how to successfully live and prosper with honour and integrity lessons and messages being presented, and yes indeed, that especially Jo seems in Little Men to have totally morphed into simply being Professor Bhaer's wife and a mother-like figure to and for her students, her so-called little men (and with a few female students being thrown in for good measure, although I do very much appreciate in Little Men that Nan is being actively encouraged to follow her dreams of perhaps later becoming a doctor, even if Daisy is still generally being depicted as a standard and like her mother Meg entirely housewifely individual). Combined with the fact that in Little Men I have also rather missed reading more about Amy/Laurie and Meg/John and that I do rather find it annoying that the only information about John Brooke in Little Men is the chapter concerning his untimely death (realistic perhaps, as John Pratt, the model for John Brooke, did in fact die very young and unexpectedly, but why could Louisa May Alcott not have devoted a bit of her Little Men narrative to Meg and John before the latter's death), while I most definitely have found Little Men engaging and readable, it also does not and never will have the same kind of reading magic appeal to and for me as Little Women does (and no, I will thus also not likely all that often be considering rereading Little Men, whereas for Little Women rereading it is both totally a pleasure and something that I continuously and happily do engage in).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    When I was in the 5th grade, my mother gave me this book. Granted, it was an abridged version for children, but it was a CHAPTER BOOK, and was REALLY LONG, and was the first - absolute first - classic story that I'd ever read. I spent the next two years reading this book over and over again. I remember having a Snoopy sticker - the nicest sticker I'd ever seen of Snoopy - and stuck it to the front cover of my book to mark it as my own. 30 years later, I read Little Women. Which I loved. And a week When I was in the 5th grade, my mother gave me this book. Granted, it was an abridged version for children, but it was a CHAPTER BOOK, and was REALLY LONG, and was the first - absolute first - classic story that I'd ever read. I spent the next two years reading this book over and over again. I remember having a Snoopy sticker - the nicest sticker I'd ever seen of Snoopy - and stuck it to the front cover of my book to mark it as my own. 30 years later, I read Little Women. Which I loved. And a week later, when I was describing Little Women to my mother-in-law (who works in a book store) she linked the two together for me. I was telling her how much I loved Jo, and she said Little Men was the story of the house/school for boys at the end of Little Women. WHAT?!? So, I read these out of order, and NOW I want to re-read Little Men with my newfound background knowledge.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    This was...boring. You can tell Alcott's heart just wasn't into writing this the way it was with Little Women. It's episodic, which doesn't bother me, except that the 'episodes' don't make you feel any closer to any of the characters. The only ones I felt close to were carry-overs from Little Women--Jo, Laurie, Fritz, etc. The kids all sort of blended together after a while, and I wasn't really invested in any of them. Spoiler in this sentence-->The death of John Brooke felt like it was thrown i This was...boring. You can tell Alcott's heart just wasn't into writing this the way it was with Little Women. It's episodic, which doesn't bother me, except that the 'episodes' don't make you feel any closer to any of the characters. The only ones I felt close to were carry-overs from Little Women--Jo, Laurie, Fritz, etc. The kids all sort of blended together after a while, and I wasn't really invested in any of them. Spoiler in this sentence-->The death of John Brooke felt like it was thrown in to try to lend the novel some gravitas, but since the sudden illness and death was sprung on us, rather than built up to, and since we are merely informed that it changes Demi, rather than shown, and since John doesn't actually appear in the novel to show us his relationships with each of the characters, it only ends up coming off as a cheap bid for tears. As always, obvious attempts to make me cry just make me mad rather than make me cry, so I merely ended up scowling at that part, rather than being moved the way I was with Beth's death in Little Women. All in all, I would say you could read this if you really can't bear not to satisfy your curiosity, but it just isn't worth the time or effort otherwise, and it may be a case of curiosity killing the cat anyway.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yusra ✨

    I didn’t know this existed asdfghkklv but at the same time, super worried to read this bc I’ll likely not like it :/

  11. 5 out of 5

    SailingByAshBreeze

    I found this book to be even more entertaining and heart-warming than Little Women (and I loved, loved, loved that book!). Little Women, of course, is a pre-requisite to Little Men. However, my 10 year old boy read Little Men first and still absolutely fell in love with the book and all the characters. Now, he is inspired to read Little Women (something he felt sure boys would not read) My 13 year old girl read Jo's boys (sequel to Little Men)---loved it as well! Here is my Little Men review I pos I found this book to be even more entertaining and heart-warming than Little Women (and I loved, loved, loved that book!). Little Women, of course, is a pre-requisite to Little Men. However, my 10 year old boy read Little Men first and still absolutely fell in love with the book and all the characters. Now, he is inspired to read Little Women (something he felt sure boys would not read) My 13 year old girl read Jo's boys (sequel to Little Men)---loved it as well! Here is my Little Men review I posted on PaperbackSwap.com: Loved this book even more than Little Women! More importantly, my 10 year old boy loved this book. In this book you will learn what happens to Jo and her family after Little Women. Jo and her husband run a boarding school for boys. Some of the boys' families pay tuition. While others are orphans who are taken in and given a beautiful new chance at life. The book is full of boyish adventures and the reader is both entertained and inspired by Jo and her parenting style. I highly recommend this book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I have always enjoyed these classic books. They were originally written for older children and the easy language and innocent themes reflect this. This is the 3rd in the Little Women series and follows the lives of grown-up Jo, her husband and the 12 boys and 2 girls that she teaches in her boarding school. It is full of traditional morals and is highly didactic. It is essentially a collection of short stories. As a mother, these books remind me of some of the traditional values that I want to t I have always enjoyed these classic books. They were originally written for older children and the easy language and innocent themes reflect this. This is the 3rd in the Little Women series and follows the lives of grown-up Jo, her husband and the 12 boys and 2 girls that she teaches in her boarding school. It is full of traditional morals and is highly didactic. It is essentially a collection of short stories. As a mother, these books remind me of some of the traditional values that I want to teach my children and about the importance of love and acceptance for families. Many people may find these books boring or childish compared with current literary fashions but I will always have a soft spot for Louisa May Alcott and look forward to the next instalment of the March family.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kimiya Roudgar

    Reading this book felt so right! There are not lots of books out there that you can say this about. I could totally feel those old feelings that I used to get when I was first reading Little Women. The atmosphere was so familiar and fortunately, this fact didn't make it a boring read. My only problem with it was (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!!) (I'm gonna give you some space so that you don't accidentally read it) ... . . . . . John Brooke's death. I mean, why?!?!???!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Reem Ghabbany

    I should have known from the title that this book will not be about my precious girls but about the little boys in Jo's school. The main characters of little women were scarcely mentioned. still, I enjoyed this cute book about these goodhearted boys. I enjoyed reading about a jo as a loving mother and wife. I love how Louisa may Alcott always manages to make her characters this loveable

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Lovable hoyden Jo from Little Women has grown up and married and, along with her Germanic Bhaer of a husband, now runs a school for boys at Plumfield. In addition to her own children she's got 12 little men that she's lovingly shaping and wants to add some girls to the mix as well. Through a series of vignettes we see Jo and her charges through a series of adventures where the March family continue their almost too good to be true development of "real family values" in post civil war Massachuset Lovable hoyden Jo from Little Women has grown up and married and, along with her Germanic Bhaer of a husband, now runs a school for boys at Plumfield. In addition to her own children she's got 12 little men that she's lovingly shaping and wants to add some girls to the mix as well. Through a series of vignettes we see Jo and her charges through a series of adventures where the March family continue their almost too good to be true development of "real family values" in post civil war Massachusetts. Unlike Dickens and the waifs he writes about, Alcott and her characters seem to always end up making the right and loving and ultimately virtuous decisions in an almost "panglossian" best of all possible worlds, where virtue is rewarded and everyone who deserves to be loved, is. While this is perhaps somewhat unrealistic, it provides a number of healthy values lessons while at the same time providing a wholesome break from our more up to date, less optimistic modern fiction. And unlike much escapist fiction, there is much here that is actually good for you. Read and enjoy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book was a beloved favorite book the first time I read it. There was such an air of childhood innocence that wasn't tainted by cynicism or the changing nature of childhood today. I loved reading stories told from a variety of viewpoints from the inhabitants at Plumfield, both adult and children. Reading this book a second time around, there were a few problematic areas that would no longer be socially acceptable in the twenty-first century. Some of the solutions to problems in the story wer This book was a beloved favorite book the first time I read it. There was such an air of childhood innocence that wasn't tainted by cynicism or the changing nature of childhood today. I loved reading stories told from a variety of viewpoints from the inhabitants at Plumfield, both adult and children. Reading this book a second time around, there were a few problematic areas that would no longer be socially acceptable in the twenty-first century. Some of the solutions to problems in the story were overly simplified but since this is a children's book, I'm willing to give it more leeway than if it had been geared towards adults. My experience this time around lost some of its shine but it still managed to be an enjoyable and entertaining read. I would downgrade this book from a 4 to a 3 as an adult reader.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    “Dear me, if men and women would only trust, understand, and help one another as my children do, what a capital place the world would be!” This was de-lightful. Alcott takes us through a year at the Bhaer’s school in Aunt March’s old estate, where Fritz is teacher and Jo is mother and moral instructor to an assortment of lost boys. Meg and John’s twins attend the school and Laurie and Amy’s little princess of a daughter makes appearances. It’s like fan fiction—some of us just want the story of our “Dear me, if men and women would only trust, understand, and help one another as my children do, what a capital place the world would be!” This was de-lightful. Alcott takes us through a year at the Bhaer’s school in Aunt March’s old estate, where Fritz is teacher and Jo is mother and moral instructor to an assortment of lost boys. Meg and John’s twins attend the school and Laurie and Amy’s little princess of a daughter makes appearances. It’s like fan fiction—some of us just want the story of our beloved characters’ lives to continue, and with Little Men, Alcott gives us a very satisfying continuation. Not that there weren’t problems. She lays on the moralizing and stereotypes quite thick here. (And talk about fat-shaming, what she does with the character “Stuffy,” giving him only one personality trait and beating it to death, is more than annoying.) And I don’t think it was on par with Little Women. Rather than that organic wonderfulness, it really seemed to be written to the demand of her fans. “As there is no particular plan to this story, except to describe a few scenes in the life at Plumfield for the amusement of certain little persons, we will gently ramble along …” Still, there is something about Alcott’s engaging writing that really holds up. She has created all of these interesting little dramas, and her characters are so distinctive and full of fun and charm that I enjoyed every page. Next, I’m on to Jo's Boys, my favorite when I last read these as a young girl.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This book brought me so much joy. The boys in this book are characters I’ll keep in my heart forever. I also loved the sprinkle of the original characters in here too (apart from Jo of course).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Little Men is, technically, the sequel to Little Women and picks up a good numbers of years later, after Jo March and her husband, Professor Bhaer, as they start their school at Plumfield, the house that originally was owned by Jo’s Aunt March. The novel opens when Nat, a street-bound boy with an amazing ability to play the violin beautifully, shows up on Jo’s doorstep, and from then on out the story features a stable but large group of kids and their kind and guiding adult influences. The Bhaer Little Men is, technically, the sequel to Little Women and picks up a good numbers of years later, after Jo March and her husband, Professor Bhaer, as they start their school at Plumfield, the house that originally was owned by Jo’s Aunt March. The novel opens when Nat, a street-bound boy with an amazing ability to play the violin beautifully, shows up on Jo’s doorstep, and from then on out the story features a stable but large group of kids and their kind and guiding adult influences. The Bhaer’s host about ten boys in their school and two girls, and I have to say that, despite the fact that this book should be everything I hate, I can’t help but be in love with it! First of all, there are a number of things about this book that I SHOULDN’T like: It’s highly, HIGHLY moralizing (as in, every time a small speech is made or a story is told, you can be damn sure that there is a moral behind it), it’s saccharin sweet, only a few of the main children are fully developed, and the writing style has the wonderfully early 19th-century aspect where, if you don’t catch the subject and verb right away, you’re going to be lost by the end of a VERY long sentence! But, even with all of these things, I LOVE this book! Perhaps it’s because it’s a sequel to one of my top five favorite books of all time, and, even more than that, follows my favorite character out of said book (what tom-boyish, bookish little girl wouldn’t find a heroine in Jo March), or perhaps it’s because I liked so many of the morals that were being jammed down my throat on almost every page – morals on things like trusting yourself, believing in love, investing in the goodness of people, continuing to believe, having faith – all things that I find extremely important in addition to extremely true! It also has to be said that the morals are taught in some very interesting ways, through some really involved metaphors, that made it fun to learn the lesson, whether the learner by nine or ten (as the ones within the book) or much, much older than that (as the reader was, this particular time). All in all, it has to be said that the book is worth reading, especially if you at all enjoyed Little Women (if you didn’t like Little Women, please, PLEASE don’t ever tell me that. We won’t be able to be friends anymore. I can deal with a lot, but not that). It wasn’t necessarily the best book I’ve ever read, but I didn’t end feeling at all disappointed, and in fact am rather looking forward to reading the last book in the ‘Little Women series’, Jo’s Boys, which follows the children of Little Men into their adult lives. It was a wonderful little book to bring me in to 2010, and be prepared – if you can get through this book without shedding a tear, you’re a far more stony person than I am

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I re-read Little Women, which resonated with me at age 24 going on 25 in a way that it never did when I was younger, and then since I knew nothing would satisfy me but more Alcott, I decided to keep going, since I'd never read the sequels. Little Men is utterly charming, and you can tell that Alcott just went to town creating the school of her dreams. I told my mom about it and she said, "It sounds like homeschooling!" Each boy has his education tailored to his interests and abilities, when they I re-read Little Women, which resonated with me at age 24 going on 25 in a way that it never did when I was younger, and then since I knew nothing would satisfy me but more Alcott, I decided to keep going, since I'd never read the sequels. Little Men is utterly charming, and you can tell that Alcott just went to town creating the school of her dreams. I told my mom about it and she said, "It sounds like homeschooling!" Each boy has his education tailored to his interests and abilities, when they can't get the kids to focus on their studies, they find something else useful and educational for them to do, and "Mrs. Jo" loves all of them like they were her own. It doesn't cover as much ground as Little Women, obviously, so it does tend to be a series of episodes of "kids do the darndest things," but it packs a special emotional punch of its own, when you're least expecting it. I also really liked that Alcott managed to keep Jo the same person she was in Little Women--obviously older and mellowed by marriage, motherhood and fulfillment of some of her dreams, but still mischievous and fun-loving. Looking forward to Jo's Boys. Will Dan go to South America? Will Tommy marry Nan? Will Nat become a professional musician? What on earth is Demi going to be when he grows up? Burning questions, my friends.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chicklet

    Someone once told me that Little Men was written before Little Women. When she tried to get it published she was refused. She was told that the public wanted a story about young ladies from a woman, not young men. It was after that, that she wrote Little Women. Sometime after that became a huge success she published Little Men...I'm not certain if she found someone to publish it for finally resorted to doing it herself. This motivated me to find and read Little Men which was good....and with th Someone once told me that Little Men was written before Little Women. When she tried to get it published she was refused. She was told that the public wanted a story about young ladies from a woman, not young men. It was after that, that she wrote Little Women. Sometime after that became a huge success she published Little Men...I'm not certain if she found someone to publish it for finally resorted to doing it herself. This motivated me to find and read Little Men which was good....and with this prior knowledge I felt a little rebellious just reading it. I've never had this story confirmed, but like to believe it to be true.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    After finishing Little Women, I dove straight into Little Men, the second volume of the series. Little Men continues some years after Little Women left of and details the life of Jo as she and her husband runs a school for young boys. This is a charming book, almost as charming as Little Women but not quite. It also lacks the depth of the latter and reads more like a series of short stories detailing the lives of the boys attending the school. I really liked Dan, the young wild boy who has experie After finishing Little Women, I dove straight into Little Men, the second volume of the series. Little Men continues some years after Little Women left of and details the life of Jo as she and her husband runs a school for young boys. This is a charming book, almost as charming as Little Women but not quite. It also lacks the depth of the latter and reads more like a series of short stories detailing the lives of the boys attending the school. I really liked Dan, the young wild boy who has experienced so much hurt and neglect and who has a hard time adjusting to the rules of the school even though Jo tries her hardest to love and help him along with the love of her baby son Teddy. I also liked Nat, the young musical prodigy. Even though I liked the stories, I felt like the book lacked a lot in living up to what I've come to expect after reading Little Women. I missed a lot of the important characters from the first book because although they appeared in this book as well, they only played rather small parts, sort of only an attempt to add some of the original flavour. Although this is a cosy read and I recommend it for anyone enjoying Little Women, I don't think I will read this again even though I will probably read Little Women again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    August 2016 - re-listened with the kids For the last 20 years this book has been one of the greatest influences over my life. The moral lessons, as are commonplace in Alcott's writing, are tender and sweet. The storytelling is so enjoyable. The characters are lovable and easy to invest in. Taken together, however, the effect is downright inspiring. LMA has proven that she knows and loves boys and their pranks as much as she loves girls and their many complexities. I am a better mother, a better t August 2016 - re-listened with the kids For the last 20 years this book has been one of the greatest influences over my life. The moral lessons, as are commonplace in Alcott's writing, are tender and sweet. The storytelling is so enjoyable. The characters are lovable and easy to invest in. Taken together, however, the effect is downright inspiring. LMA has proven that she knows and loves boys and their pranks as much as she loves girls and their many complexities. I am a better mother, a better teacher and a more tender wife because of Jo March and Marmee. I am a better scholar and thinker because of Professor's Bhaer's love for knowledge. My review is not profound but it is with genuine admiration that rank this as being among my most favorite novels.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I mostly remember almost crying through this entire book, because I was so upset that Jo was still married to the old German dude and not Laurie. It was fun to see the March sisters' childen, and the stories about the school were interesting. But there will always be that little part of me that wants Jo and her Teddy to be together . . .

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn Buxton

    This is just a lovely little romp, very similar to Little Women, and therefore very warm and comfortable, just like its predecessor. If you like Little Women, you'll like this! It's one of those books that just meanders on, and feels so familiar and charming because it captures the child in all of us.

  26. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    Audiobook #201 Are adults ever so sincere and giving as Jo and her husband? This was just the sweetest ever! Those dear boys got a family AND they never took if for granted. I dont know if this story could be written today.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Oh, Jo.... *sigh*

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eloria

    I liked it but it was not just as amazing as the other Alcott novels I have read. I am excited for Jo's boys though bc they will be older in that one and older = romance and I loveeee classic romance.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michaila

    I'm just going to say that this book was adorable. Demi and Daisy, Nat and Dan, ALL the boys, and Nan, made up the book so wonderfully well and added such detailed characters it would be hard not to like almost all of them. My favorite was Dan, however. Because he entered the book as such a ruff, loveless, wild creature, who harmed the school and was sent away. But when Jo (Mother Bhaer ;) sees him all torn and hurt lying in the straw, pleading with his eyes, you just want to rescue him yourself. I'm just going to say that this book was adorable. Demi and Daisy, Nat and Dan, ALL the boys, and Nan, made up the book so wonderfully well and added such detailed characters it would be hard not to like almost all of them. My favorite was Dan, however. Because he entered the book as such a ruff, loveless, wild creature, who harmed the school and was sent away. But when Jo (Mother Bhaer ;) sees him all torn and hurt lying in the straw, pleading with his eyes, you just want to rescue him yourself. And then he changes. He takes the blame for Nat, when neither of them took Tommy's dollar, just so the younger boy will not be tormented. Teddy adores him, he pleases Jo, and helps the boys. He tames a wild colt in attempt to tame his own restless spirit, and when he helps Jo find Teddy and Nan, he becomes such a brilliant part of the family. Each trial and temptation, dream and fancy, was life-like and enjoyable to see the good outcome. Louisa May Alcott is definitely a favorite of mine. ~Mic

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    I like this one better than Little Women but not as much as Jo's Boys. I adore Dan from the moment he slouches in, and Tommy Bangs reminds me of my own boy. There's not as much overt moralizing here as in LW, and the scenes of domestic life are somehow a little more vibrant in their cheerful chaos. It's in this book that one really sees how perfect the Professor is for Jo, and how happy she is with a houseful of harum-scarum boys to tend. It's certainly hard to be objective about a book one has I like this one better than Little Women but not as much as Jo's Boys. I adore Dan from the moment he slouches in, and Tommy Bangs reminds me of my own boy. There's not as much overt moralizing here as in LW, and the scenes of domestic life are somehow a little more vibrant in their cheerful chaos. It's in this book that one really sees how perfect the Professor is for Jo, and how happy she is with a houseful of harum-scarum boys to tend. It's certainly hard to be objective about a book one has read a zillion times. I love this one and always will, no doubt.

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