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Coyote Wisdom: Healing Power in Native American Stories

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An in-depth look at the therapeutic and transformative powers of storytelling in Native American and other cultures- Explores how to create a healing state of mind using stories- Includes healing stories from Native American traditions and other cultures from around the world- By the author of the bestselling "Coyote Medicine"Stories are powerful sources of meaning that sh An in-depth look at the therapeutic and transformative powers of storytelling in Native American and other cultures- Explores how to create a healing state of mind using stories- Includes healing stories from Native American traditions and other cultures from around the world- By the author of the bestselling "Coyote Medicine"Stories are powerful sources of meaning that shape and transform our lives. We tell stories to track our process of personal and spiritual growth and to honor and respect the journeys we have made. Through stories we are provided with experiences of spiritual empowerment that can lead to transformation.In "Coyote Wisdom, " Lewis Mehl-Madrona explores the healing use of stories passed down from generation to generation in Native American culture and describes how we can apply this wisdom to empower and transform our own lives. A storytelling approach to transformation starts with how we were created and how we can re-create ourselves through the stories we tell. As we explore the archetypal characters and situations that populate the inner world of our stories, we can experience breakthroughs of healing and even miracles of transformation.This approach to healing through stories runs counter to the current model of modern psychology. The stories we tell about ourselves may model our lives, but by introducing new characters and plots, we can come to see ourselves in a new way. The author also draws upon the cultures of other indigenous peoples--the Maori, East Africans, Mongolians, Aborigines, and Laplanders--to illustrate the healing use of stories throughout the world.


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An in-depth look at the therapeutic and transformative powers of storytelling in Native American and other cultures- Explores how to create a healing state of mind using stories- Includes healing stories from Native American traditions and other cultures from around the world- By the author of the bestselling "Coyote Medicine"Stories are powerful sources of meaning that sh An in-depth look at the therapeutic and transformative powers of storytelling in Native American and other cultures- Explores how to create a healing state of mind using stories- Includes healing stories from Native American traditions and other cultures from around the world- By the author of the bestselling "Coyote Medicine"Stories are powerful sources of meaning that shape and transform our lives. We tell stories to track our process of personal and spiritual growth and to honor and respect the journeys we have made. Through stories we are provided with experiences of spiritual empowerment that can lead to transformation.In "Coyote Wisdom, " Lewis Mehl-Madrona explores the healing use of stories passed down from generation to generation in Native American culture and describes how we can apply this wisdom to empower and transform our own lives. A storytelling approach to transformation starts with how we were created and how we can re-create ourselves through the stories we tell. As we explore the archetypal characters and situations that populate the inner world of our stories, we can experience breakthroughs of healing and even miracles of transformation.This approach to healing through stories runs counter to the current model of modern psychology. The stories we tell about ourselves may model our lives, but by introducing new characters and plots, we can come to see ourselves in a new way. The author also draws upon the cultures of other indigenous peoples--the Maori, East Africans, Mongolians, Aborigines, and Laplanders--to illustrate the healing use of stories throughout the world.

30 review for Coyote Wisdom: Healing Power in Native American Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Gamble

    I had trouble deciding between giving this book four or five stars, but decided that if I had to think about it that much I shouldn't give it five. The thing is, I can't quite articulate what was uncomfortable in this read, only that it was present. Perhaps part of it was that the book wasn't what I expected. I thought I would read something on using story for healing, which it was, but it was presented by telling stories and how they were applied to the person. I found the back and forth nature I had trouble deciding between giving this book four or five stars, but decided that if I had to think about it that much I shouldn't give it five. The thing is, I can't quite articulate what was uncomfortable in this read, only that it was present. Perhaps part of it was that the book wasn't what I expected. I thought I would read something on using story for healing, which it was, but it was presented by telling stories and how they were applied to the person. I found the back and forth nature of those passages (a bit of story, a bit of conversation, a bit of story) jolting and hard to follow. I also had trouble connecting some of the stories to the person in question, which made it somewhat hard to follow. I couldn't seem to see the commonalities the author seemed to think were obvious. He also used a fair amount of Disney stories (sometimes not knowing that the Disney story is offensive to some people in their tradition, such as the Mulan example). There's nothing wrong with that, it just felt uncomfortable for some reason- I think mostly because I have a tendency to pull away from mainstream culture stories. He made a good point for using mainstream cultural stories, though. There were also connections I didn't make until the last chapter or two, which would have helped. He mentions, for instance, that he uses ceremony to create a slightly altered state before the story telling, but I didn't realize he was hypnotizing his clients before telling the story until the end. The 'problem,' if there is one, is probably me. I just still have trouble giving it five stars with my full heart.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A worthwhile dive into "alternative mental health" as I like to call it, recognizing that the stories we tell ourselves ultimately determine our very existence. We can allow stories to label or liberate. My greatest "a-ha!" was when he talked about healing stories versus sickness stories. I realized that the traumatic stories I have from my own life will, upon every retelling, promote more trauma in others and myself. But, the moment I heal from my trauma, I can then share those same stories, an A worthwhile dive into "alternative mental health" as I like to call it, recognizing that the stories we tell ourselves ultimately determine our very existence. We can allow stories to label or liberate. My greatest "a-ha!" was when he talked about healing stories versus sickness stories. I realized that the traumatic stories I have from my own life will, upon every retelling, promote more trauma in others and myself. But, the moment I heal from my trauma, I can then share those same stories, and it promotes healing instead. The stories themselves are generally the same, but based on the healing work I've done as the teller determines whether or not I'm sharing trauma or healing with the rest of the world. I'll never forget that.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miz Lizzie

    This is a book that spoke to my soul and my passion for stories. Lewis Mehl-Madrona is a physician who has come to use stories and his traditional culture in conjunction with Western medicine to help people heal themselves. Finding a story that speaks to you and your current struggle can be a catalyst for healing. Ceremony is also important to making a transition from one way of being to another. I've been telling the story of Raven stealing (back) the sun and the moon since reading this book. F This is a book that spoke to my soul and my passion for stories. Lewis Mehl-Madrona is a physician who has come to use stories and his traditional culture in conjunction with Western medicine to help people heal themselves. Finding a story that speaks to you and your current struggle can be a catalyst for healing. Ceremony is also important to making a transition from one way of being to another. I've been telling the story of Raven stealing (back) the sun and the moon since reading this book. For now at least it is my transformation story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    I really wanted more from this book, but it was good at what it was.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Best book I've read in several years. This guy is an incredible writer.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Cantrell

    Read this many years ago.... an awesome reference tool.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leroy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Sweeney

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alnem13

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  13. 5 out of 5

    Felicity G.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jim Magaw

  15. 4 out of 5

    Freya

  16. 5 out of 5

    Initially NO

  17. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy Elizabeth

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  21. 5 out of 5

    RaVen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Luckyluke

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angelo

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tyrrell H

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arabellagreenleaf

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vince

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