counter create hit 1984 And Animal Farm Audiobook - Download Free eBook

30 review for 1984 And Animal Farm Audiobook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dylan McIntosh

    I read Animal Farm once a decade. It is a quick read that constantly reminds me that I need to keep the blinders off and not take everything for granted. I have a strange desire for bacon for some reason.

  2. 5 out of 5

    C

    These are Orwell's most famous books. Both are dystopian tales of the dangers of a totalitarian government. Similarities between the books: The government knows best. The intelligentsia seize power. The naive proletariat are oppressed and kept ignorant. The government bends or breaks its own rules for its benefit. The government uses propaganda to keep the proletariat in check. The government rewrites history to prove that it's correct and that life is better with the government than it was before the These are Orwell's most famous books. Both are dystopian tales of the dangers of a totalitarian government. Similarities between the books: The government knows best. The intelligentsia seize power. The naive proletariat are oppressed and kept ignorant. The government bends or breaks its own rules for its benefit. The government uses propaganda to keep the proletariat in check. The government rewrites history to prove that it's correct and that life is better with the government than it was before the government's rise to power. Both books have pessimistic endings. Here are my reviews of the books: Animal Farm 1984 The SparkNotes for both books are very good: Animal Farm and 1984.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janete Fabricio ON SEMI HIATUS

    Two of my favorites books of all the time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Peterson

    2020-09-22 (This review is of 1984 only, at least for now.) "the three slogans of the Party stood out in bold capitals: WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH." This is the defining import of this book to me. The slogans were not only repeated many times in the book, but their importance and what they represented was carefully explained many times and ways. Orwell's masterpiece did a fantastic job of explaining how total corruption of the language (words were supposed to mean the ex 2020-09-22 (This review is of 1984 only, at least for now.) "the three slogans of the Party stood out in bold capitals: WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH." This is the defining import of this book to me. The slogans were not only repeated many times in the book, but their importance and what they represented was carefully explained many times and ways. Orwell's masterpiece did a fantastic job of explaining how total corruption of the language (words were supposed to mean the exact opposite of what they originally and truly meant in Newspeak") was key to the horror of the total state and every citizen's being controlled by "the party" of "Big Brother." I first read this book about 50 years ago, when I was in High School. It made a very big impression on me. I learned much about it and from it. Over the years I have been referred to it or myself referred to it literally hundreds of times. Fortunately, it is a classic and still well read. It has so much to offer. It is so prescient in so many ways. But probably because there were major errors, confusions, an almost total pessimism and lack of any good understanding of what a free society is really based on, too many people have lost sight of the good and important parts. Our society today is so overrun by the very things that Orwell so graphically warned us about, that I urge you in the strongest terms to read this book (or again, like me if necessary). Take the three slogans highlighted above. Orwell calls them part of the "Doublethink" he explains was the crucial strategy of the party/Big Brother to get people to eliminate any real critical thinking and be able to just parrot back anything the party wanted them to believe. The book goes into example after example. But let me suggest a few that are happening in our society today (and for the last 150 years or so), to show you how important Orwell's concept is: Progressive = those who believe in progress, right? Well, in fact, NO. It means the OPPOSITE to the people who claim that title. "Progressives" for the last 140+ years have believed in and acted on the idea that slavery = freedom, that more government control of our lives somehow equals more freedom. Their program is to slowly, piece by piece (or faster, if they come clean and admit to being Marxists, Bolsheviks, Khmer Rouge, Chavistas, Juche, etc. etc.) put government in control of our lives by taxing, regulating, regimenting - controlling us. Liberal = those who believe in liberty, right? Well, in fact, for most of them, NO, except in a few select areas. People who have taken over this word in the US (not everywhere in the world, where it actually does still mean pro-liberty policies, to a bit greater extent), want less liberty and more government taxes, schools, controls, regulations, etc. Very similarly to how "progressive" was corrupted the same way - liberal really now means partial slave or at least anti-liberty, in most key areas. They just delude themselves when they think they are getting more liberty with their policies. They always conveniently forget that taxes are compulsory, regulations put you in jail if you don't follow them, that you have less of your freedom the more the government takes from you or tells you what to do. Antifa = those who are Anti-Fascist, and actually fight fascists, right? Well, in fact NO. They are the ones who act most like the fascists of the 1930s and 40s - using violence to achieve their goals. Not caring about civilized behavior at all. Starting or expanding riots. Disrupting peaceful meetings, so audiences cannot hear speakers, but only the chants/shouting of the "protesters." Guess why I put that word in quotations? Bet you can. Does the term "mostly peaceful" ring a bell? Another lie and type of doublespeak of the mainstream media. Sure, most of the "protesters" may well be "peaceful," for a time. But when they allow and actually support (even if passively) the violent rioters, arsonists, looters, etc. they are should be called accomplices, NOT protesters at that point. So, I have tried to give you just a small taste of how super-relevant Orwell's classic is today. There are so many parts I could highlight to show this. But I trust you get it. Treat yourself - you will not regret it. So I want to move on to just a little on 1984's deficits and where you can and should go after reading or rereading 1984. First is a great biography of Orwell: "Orwell Your Orwell" by David Ramsay Steele. It is simply indispensable in explaining Orwell 's milieu and his thinking on this and all his other key writings, and life. Orwell's pessimism and pro-socialist confusions (in 1984 and elsewhere) as well as brilliant insights are explained in that book. Don't miss it. But in addition to Steele's bio of Orwell, one really needs to read at least some key works of Ludwig Mises to understand not just where Orwell went wrong, but the positive case for a better world, a free, peaceful and abundant world and the system of human social cooperation that makes it possible - free markets, otherwise known as capitalism, if you have a clear understanding of that term. To start, I would pick his "Liberalism" (in the original/classical sense). And next I would go to his fairly long, but totally worth it, "Socialism" to eviscerate that scourge of the mind and of the real physical world. Feel free to check out any of my Goodreads reviews of these books. Addenda: Perhaps listing some more gems of doublethink terms from 1984's Newspeak might be enticing: Ministry of Truth - Where the main character Winston works changing the historical record to suit the current party/Big Brother needs Memory Hole - where the past evidence is put and taken to be burned Ministry of Love - where the torture of citizens is performed - especially in "Room 101." Think Lubyanka Prison. Ministry of Peace - war making part of the government And how about a few passages I loved that seem so appropriate today: "He was a fattish but active man of paralyzing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms—one of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended." "so vicious was the boy’s demeanor, that it was not altogether a game.... He spun round just in time to see Mrs. Parsons dragging her son back into the doorway while the boy pocketed a catapult [slingshot]. “Goldstein!” bellowed the boy as the door closed on him. But what most struck Winston was the look of helpless fright on the woman’s grayish face....Another year, two years, and they would be watching her night and day for symptoms of unorthodoxy. Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages..." Any parallels with today's society? "and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it. The songs, the processions, the banners, the hiking, the drilling with dummy rifles, the yelling of slogans, the worship of Big Brother—it was all a sort of glorious game to them. All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which the Times did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak—“child hero” was the phrase generally used—had overheard some compromising remark and denounced his parents to the Thought Police." Think: Hitler youth, Red Guards, young pioneer, communist youth, present day eco groups, sjw groups ... "Even the slogans will change. How could you have a slogan like ‘freedom is slavery’ when the concept of freedom has been abolished?" Note: it is freedom that is abolished, not slavery! "In fact there will be no thought, as we understand it now. Orthodoxy means not thinking—not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness.” Note: Anther key point (think PC speak for "orthodoxy") that is happening now too! “There is a word in Newspeak,” said Syme. “I don’t know whether you know it: duckspeak, to quack like a duck. It is one of those interesting words that have two contradictory meanings. Applied to an opponent, it is abuse; applied to someone you agree with, it is praise.” Unquestionably Syme will be vaporized, Winston thought again. He thought it with a kind of sadness, although well knowing that Syme despised him and slightly disliked him, and was fully capable of denouncing him as a thought-criminal if he saw any reason for doing so. There was something subtly wrong with Syme. There was something that he lacked: discretion, aloofness, a sort of saving stupidity." I could go on and on. this book has so much to give. But I bet you get the point.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mariel

    Celebrity Death Match tournament versus Macbeth. In a galaxy that's this one and today only most people don't realize it because it scrolls on the screen in teeny tiny neon green letters with a sterile surgical instrumental backdrop. Or CNN. Once upon a time that's today. There was a MAN and a Big Brother and they were one and the same. What about the sisters? "You could be big brother, you know. People always ask who the MAN is supposed to be. You're a man, aren't you? Although it has been some t Celebrity Death Match tournament versus Macbeth. In a galaxy that's this one and today only most people don't realize it because it scrolls on the screen in teeny tiny neon green letters with a sterile surgical instrumental backdrop. Or CNN. Once upon a time that's today. There was a MAN and a Big Brother and they were one and the same. What about the sisters? "You could be big brother, you know. People always ask who the MAN is supposed to be. You're a man, aren't you? Although it has been some time since you were able to get it up... I do know you're keeping me down with your accepted level of mediocrity." Macbeth was tired after a long day of omitting the thous and thys from the Dougie Howser's Dictionary. His wife reported his mouth breathing coworker and he was a shoo-in for the promotion of updating each and every one of Shakespeare's plays into a high school comedy for the ABC Big Brother telescreens. Why couldn't she let him be well enough alone? Why did they have to move up one more spot on the assembly line? "I've enrolled you into the adopt a brother program. To be a Big Brother you must be a brother." "But that's for perverts!" It was useless to argue. The two minutes of hate was over and it wouldn't do to have a tiff with his wife that couldn't be passed off as mandatory aggression. Macbeth did not want to argue with his wife. To end it meant doing something. The girl half of the Macbeth team had assigned herself another job. "It's not like I'm not working for us too, you know. I have to hit on that duffer Winston. Do you think that I like suggesting power behind the curtain to feeble men who cannot live with themselves as impotence personified?" "Duffer is out of the accepted lingo, as is impotence. How about loser?" Offered the Macbeth with a penis. Lady Macbeth wanted Macbeth to think for himself, so long as he was thinking what she wanted him to think. Was that too much to ask? The use of if-you-don't-already-know-then-I-can't-tell-you worked wonders on the thoughtpolice. They were helpless against it. "If no one knows who Big Brother really is then why can't it be you?" "You is out of the dictionary. How about they?" "That's my point! Who is they? Why can't they be me?" Macbeth did not understand what his wife was saying. He had not the words to understand it. He had worked all day to take those words away from himself. Work and the telescreen. Who had room for anything else? "Are you a man?" Macbeth did not know. "What do I want to be married to this man for? I don't know what I want and the thoughtpolice cannot tell me what that is. I know that." What was that feeling? The sense of things that were already bad getting a lot worse. It happened more frequently than anything touching on how to dust off the twenty dollar words no one could afford anymore (after all, they were not on the rations list) to describe the other range of experience and emotions. Ambition? Voided out. Don't look to see the man behind the curtain. "Um, honey, you left the telescreen on, didn't you?" "No, they did." Win: 1984

  6. 4 out of 5

    Garg Ankit

    4.5 rounded to 5 stars. For individual reviews, follow the links below: Animal Farm 1984 4.5 rounded to 5 stars. For individual reviews, follow the links below: Animal Farm 1984

  7. 4 out of 5

    Markus Molina

    I love 1984, I love Animal Farm, and I love George Orwell. There is so much wisdom and depth to these two stories and there is so much that has been written or said about them, it would be a struggle to review them without subconsciously regurgitating all the good things I've heard. I just feel like both of these stories, and especially 1984 should be read by everyone. I believe it helps you appreciate what you got and to question everything you hear. I believe they are some of the most thought I love 1984, I love Animal Farm, and I love George Orwell. There is so much wisdom and depth to these two stories and there is so much that has been written or said about them, it would be a struggle to review them without subconsciously regurgitating all the good things I've heard. I just feel like both of these stories, and especially 1984 should be read by everyone. I believe it helps you appreciate what you got and to question everything you hear. I believe they are some of the most thought provoking stories ever written and they're also fun to read, which sometimes isn't the case for a lot of the literary books people tell you that you should read. I recall once when my friend Winston (I actually have a friend named Winston, I'm not referring to the protagonist of 1984,) had to read 1984 and was kind of down about it because he heard it was just political satire or something and he presumed it would be dull. I told him that I really enjoyed it and I assumed he would too. And when he was finished with it, he came up to me and told me how when he finished-- he had tears streaming down his eyes from how much it had touched him and that he loved it. And, even after having finished it for a 2nd time, I had tears welling up and my heart strings were being tugged and my love for these stories has only grown. These are the types of stories that turn people into readers. The endings for both of them are probably my two favorite endings of all time and I feel that would be a crime not to mention. 10/10

  8. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Two classic books in one! I read both of these stories years ago and loved them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    Re-read. brilliant. a must-read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dana Turk

    It is difficult to rate a novel which is incomplete. This version if Animal Farm and 1984 does not contain the full versions of either book. Animal Farm has only the first 10 chapters and ends abruptly on page 86. 1984 has only the first 3 sections and repeats itself. This is more a sampling of Orwells Classics rather than a complete read. If you want to read the full novel. Don't purchase this one It is difficult to rate a novel which is incomplete. This version if Animal Farm and 1984 does not contain the full versions of either book. Animal Farm has only the first 10 chapters and ends abruptly on page 86. 1984 has only the first 3 sections and repeats itself. This is more a sampling of Orwells Classics rather than a complete read. If you want to read the full novel. Don't purchase this one

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kara Belden

    Two of my favorite books! Meant to re-read 1984 with the student book club, but it got away from me. 1984 was one of my favorite required high school reads my senior year, and I LOVE to teach Animal Farm!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Text Publishing

    ‘There are no replacements for George Orwell, just as there are no replacements for a Bernard Shaw or a Mark Twain…he pricked, provoked and badgered lazy minds, delighted those who enjoyed watching an original intelligence at work.’ Time

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leonard

    “All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.” Joseph Stalin In Animal Farm George Orwell reenacted the Russian Revolution and its aftermath, Major, Napoleon, Snowball, Jones, and Frederick incarnating Lenin, Stalin, Trotsky, Tsar Nicolas II and Hitler. But through the fable, Orwell critiques not only communism but also any corruption of power, leaders highlighting real or imagined threats to instill fear in followers and solidify power. Leon Trotsky As often repeated throu “All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.” Joseph Stalin In Animal Farm George Orwell reenacted the Russian Revolution and its aftermath, Major, Napoleon, Snowball, Jones, and Frederick incarnating Lenin, Stalin, Trotsky, Tsar Nicolas II and Hitler. But through the fable, Orwell critiques not only communism but also any corruption of power, leaders highlighting real or imagined threats to instill fear in followers and solidify power. Leon Trotsky As often repeated throughout history, people out of fear often would submit to the state’s unchecked power in exchange for security real or imagined. In the end, Napoleon exploited the animals just as Farmer Jones previously had and even emulated humans when he gave a dinner to neighboring farmers, who represented the leaders of other nations and would gladly play poker with the tyrant as long as they can benefit from the friendship. Animal Farm is a lighthearted fable for a serious subject. ----------------------------------------------------------- Under Big Brother’s omniscient eyes, Winston Smith tried to ignite his only freedom, the freedom to believe in “obvious” truths, but by the novel’s end, at the café Winston was unsure what two plus two would make, a sign that O’Brien had successfully reintegrated a “lost soul” and Winston had become like his friends and neighbors, unable to question and thus unable to revolt. What sends shivers down our spines is not the various tortures O’Brien performed, but after these tortures, Winston’s total capitulation¾mind, body, and soul¾to Big Brother. When the mind kowtows to external authority and ceases to reflect and question, then the individual had successfully metamorphosed into a machine. Oceania Society Winston, by editing previous documents to conform to Oceana’s present position, such as whether Eurasia is friend or foe, had helped the regime’s guardians, who like O’Brien believed “who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past,” mold the citizens’ minds. But Oceana, like other totalitarian regimes, also turned to the indispensable tool, fear, to chisel its citizens’ minds and hearts to its agenda’s shape and form. To stimulate fear and rouse its citizens to a common cause, it would when necessary create fathom enemies, either Eurasia or Eastasia, even though these totalitarian regimes also had similar ideologies, or rather, like Oceana, no ideologies. Under 1984’s dystopian sky, Winston must bow, not only because of Big Brother’s overwhelming power and presence, but also because of Winston’s inability to form any ideologies. Even though he wanted to think freely, he lacked the training and thus the analytical mind to counter O’Brien’s offenses. In the end, his mind followed the path of least resistance. Orwell’s 1984 is a dark apocalypse of sub-human society where homo-sapiens had replaced machines to operate an efficient hierarchy, an apocalypse which any people would usher wherever and whenever they ceased to question “intuitively obvious truths.” George Orwell

  14. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Re-read this gem last night. It never gets old. Truly another beautifully written classic

  15. 5 out of 5

    Farnoosh Brock

    You Must Read Animal Farm. That's the brief version of my review. Eric Arthur Blair, or George Orwell as the world knows him, is a genius at describing fear, terror, doubt, uncertainty, mischief, evil, and hopelessness. The writing is beyond exquisite, even if the topic is morose. Such a loss to the world that Mr. Orwell died when he was just 46 years old. The unwritten works that he never wrote, the works that would have enriched our world and weren't meant to be. In Animal Farm, much like 1984, You Must Read Animal Farm. That's the brief version of my review. Eric Arthur Blair, or George Orwell as the world knows him, is a genius at describing fear, terror, doubt, uncertainty, mischief, evil, and hopelessness. The writing is beyond exquisite, even if the topic is morose. Such a loss to the world that Mr. Orwell died when he was just 46 years old. The unwritten works that he never wrote, the works that would have enriched our world and weren't meant to be. In Animal Farm, much like 1984, Orwell goes where you just don't want him to go - painting a dark grim bleak picture that grows worse by the page, of precisely what happens when the evil minds take over the masses, and scheme lie after lie until the truth is so distorted one can't even trust one's own memory. A fantastic allegory to the horrific Russian revolution and the communist party, one that makes you want to open up real history book to remind yourself that yes, this actually happened not to imagery sheep and hens and horses and farm animals in a little work of fiction, this happened to millions of people and this is still happening. Well, I am so SO so glad I read this book even though it was uncomfortable, disturbing and scary - not half as scary as 1984 but scary enough to never forget. But I'm also glad it's over. It was heavy reading and an interesting feeling between loving the writer, loving the writing but resenting the story because it brings to light the ugliest of all ugliness in the world and puts it on the spotlight. My favorite lines - favorite is a funny sort of word to use for lines that make your blood run cold but here goes: "All animals are equal but some are more equal than others.", "No animal shall drink ... to excess.", "Four legs good, two legs better." “Comrades!' he cried. 'You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege?" "Surely comrades, you don't want Jones back now do you?" "The animals wished there were less figures and more food in their bellies." And on and on and on. This book is a gem, Orwell was a gift, and I am so grateful that I had the opportunity to read Animal Farm.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Suad Alhalwachi

    If you read this book as a straight fiction then it’s a novel for children and I am sure they will enjoy it and of course they will start to hate the pigs (maybe that’s why we don’t see many cartoons or stories with pigs for children except Peppa pig which my grandkids love so much). However if it’s a political story that represents a party that overthrows a government and takes over the country giving promises to the people and then in years to come changes those promises, then the writer had s If you read this book as a straight fiction then it’s a novel for children and I am sure they will enjoy it and of course they will start to hate the pigs (maybe that’s why we don’t see many cartoons or stories with pigs for children except Peppa pig which my grandkids love so much). However if it’s a political story that represents a party that overthrows a government and takes over the country giving promises to the people and then in years to come changes those promises, then the writer had succeeded in proving the point. The book can be applied to any country as in my opinion any new comer wants to make himself lovable by the people, slowly making changes that benefit himself and maybe his party and forgets about the livelihood of the public. We can also apply the novel to revolutions, new comers to politics, whether religious or otherwise, and personal takeover of governments. When economy shows improvement then a human being will show his real self, he or she will think of maximum gains to oneself and forget about the others, ensuring that they will either be killed or imprisoned. The story narrates our life since time memorial and I have to say that I had felt great pain after reading it. I left the preface to the story to the end. It seems that the writer meant The Soviet Union!! What was interesting to me that I read the book on the way to Russia, and when I reached there I was discussing it with my Russian friend who said that the book was written about UK government. So there is a great misconception in the book that I am not going to indulge in. Good book. I gave 3 stars because of my sad feeling and not because it’s a bad book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dayla

    Very clever book. In this book, the hidden veil of Democracy vs Socialism is entirely explained through this wonderful analogy. Someone recently stated that if one really lived by the principles of most of the New Testament, one's world view would be Socialism/Communism as explained by Marx. However, no one has ever truly tried to live in a world that is without a caste system. Very clever book. In this book, the hidden veil of Democracy vs Socialism is entirely explained through this wonderful analogy. Someone recently stated that if one really lived by the principles of most of the New Testament, one's world view would be Socialism/Communism as explained by Marx. However, no one has ever truly tried to live in a world that is without a caste system.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nameeta

    It is always difficult to review a book so widely read and appreciated. Especially one which is still relevant since the time it was written. I do not know anything about the Russian Revolution which this book is supposed to be based on nor am I well versed with the aristocratic/ political regimes of the world. The title is so misleading, could have fooled me into thinking that this was a book about a farm where animals can talk and live together harmoniously... sort of like something Enid Blyton It is always difficult to review a book so widely read and appreciated. Especially one which is still relevant since the time it was written. I do not know anything about the Russian Revolution which this book is supposed to be based on nor am I well versed with the aristocratic/ political regimes of the world. The title is so misleading, could have fooled me into thinking that this was a book about a farm where animals can talk and live together harmoniously... sort of like something Enid Blyton would write. But I have read 1984 so I know that isn't George Orwell's genre. This book is about humans and their behavior portrayed by animals which does not in anyway reduce the relevance of what it tries to tell us. Each of these animals represents people or a segment of society we see in our everyday lives. And that being said everything that happens is what has probably happened and will probably keep happening as long as we continue to function as we do as a species. I read 1984 a while back (my first dystopian) and the world created by Orwell has stuck with me till this day and Animal Farm I am sure is going to be no different. I recommend these 2 books to anyone and everyone.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Behrokh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Animal Castle novel has a simple, humorous language, and is very entertaining and engaging, yet is based on a symbolic and symbolic style. She takes it upon herself and expresses her personal emotion in this novel with complete honesty and courage. In the novel, the farm animal revolution symbolizes the workers' revolution and its fate against the capitalist system. "All animals are equal, but some are more equal" ..." The Animal Castle novel has a simple, humorous language, and is very entertaining and engaging, yet is based on a symbolic and symbolic style. She takes it upon herself and expresses her personal emotion in this novel with complete honesty and courage. In the novel, the farm animal revolution symbolizes the workers' revolution and its fate against the capitalist system. "All animals are equal, but some are more equal" ..."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Hatton

    It must be at least 20 years since I last read these two dystopian classics. Although, I'm certain my opinion of them wouldn't have diminished one iota if I were to read them today. In fact, I'm sure they would, even now, contain much relevance to the current political scene. The ending of Animal Farm is particularly prescient: the abandoned and betrayed animals looking in through the windows of the farmhouse and being unable to tell the pigs from the humans. This from a novel written 10 years be It must be at least 20 years since I last read these two dystopian classics. Although, I'm certain my opinion of them wouldn't have diminished one iota if I were to read them today. In fact, I'm sure they would, even now, contain much relevance to the current political scene. The ending of Animal Farm is particularly prescient: the abandoned and betrayed animals looking in through the windows of the farmhouse and being unable to tell the pigs from the humans. This from a novel written 10 years before the discovery of DNA, which revealed that, of all the farmyard animals, the most closely related to humans were.....the porkers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Who controls the past controls the future. ...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maria Lasprilla

    Aninal Farm was entertaining until I kept on finding the similarities with Venezuela. It was like the history of the last 15-20 years of the country told in the form of a fable and written decades earlier. 1984: this was worse than watching a horror movie (which I hate) because while in a movie I'm always aware it's fiction, the book kept on confusing me making me feel I was actually going through a factual piece. Only specific elements got me out of it. The biggest impressions happened while re Aninal Farm was entertaining until I kept on finding the similarities with Venezuela. It was like the history of the last 15-20 years of the country told in the form of a fable and written decades earlier. 1984: this was worse than watching a horror movie (which I hate) because while in a movie I'm always aware it's fiction, the book kept on confusing me making me feel I was actually going through a factual piece. Only specific elements got me out of it. The biggest impressions happened while reading "The Book" in part 2 and feeling like I was reading history of the world. You realize we live in a scary and predictable world when it can get mixed up with a fiction book from more than half a century ago. P.S. What a wonderful analysis of the language he makes in the Appendix describing Newspeak. The structure, the sounds, the meanings... it only makes me want to read more of everything and question, think, break rules, widen my vocabulary. Anything that takes me in the opposite direction of becoming an Ingsoc kind of...thinker?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jongalt

    Its quite unique how he portrays his characters as animals. And its often hilarious. But once again...hes a socialist...this is what he wants...why does he trash it here but fight for it in real life? But I have to thank him just like I did for 1984 for making a great book explaining the pitfalls of socialism. Overall: Storyline is funny yet serious. You hate pigs more after your done. You realize that George Orwell is a hypocrite. Read it and feel great we aren't to this point...yet. Its quite unique how he portrays his characters as animals. And its often hilarious. But once again...hes a socialist...this is what he wants...why does he trash it here but fight for it in real life? But I have to thank him just like I did for 1984 for making a great book explaining the pitfalls of socialism. Overall: Storyline is funny yet serious. You hate pigs more after your done. You realize that George Orwell is a hypocrite. Read it and feel great we aren't to this point...yet.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    Orwellian has been introduced into the English language for good reason.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eli Hornyak

    Big Brother is watching

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Clouse

    In my opinion, some “classics” get their name but don’t live up to them. Animal Farm doesn’t fit that category. Animal Farm is short and so clearly communicates the point it’s trying to get across and it does a great job. The slow decline from one “master” into another, the ability to be free, but just as bad or worse off than when they were under Mr. Jones. Orwell does a great job showing how quickly a society can collapse under a bad ruler. Similarly, 1984 is a book that I think had some slow In my opinion, some “classics” get their name but don’t live up to them. Animal Farm doesn’t fit that category. Animal Farm is short and so clearly communicates the point it’s trying to get across and it does a great job. The slow decline from one “master” into another, the ability to be free, but just as bad or worse off than when they were under Mr. Jones. Orwell does a great job showing how quickly a society can collapse under a bad ruler. Similarly, 1984 is a book that I think had some slow parts, but was overall, exciting. Winston lives in a world where he is always seen and monitored. He wrestles with life and what it might look like to betray this government but often feels hopeless. This book has some very dark turns but does a great job showing what a totalitarian regime could be like if it really succeeded in its plans. By the end, I didn’t want to stop reading.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Qassab Bashi

    I liked the Animal Farm more than 1984- As for the 1984 nothing strange for me. I'm from Syria and I know that what he said is what we lived in the 80s and 90s but the prisons are much much worse. The Animal Farm 4 stars 1984- 3 I liked the Animal Farm more than 1984- As for the 1984 nothing strange for me. I'm from Syria and I know that what he said is what we lived in the 80s and 90s but the prisons are much much worse. The Animal Farm 4 stars 1984- 3

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    I have finally read 1984. It just took me a few years to pick it up. My rating is leaning more toward 3.5 more than 3. I enjoyed the book. I really don't know how to express my feelings about it yet. But I did enjoyed it. I have finally read 1984. It just took me a few years to pick it up. My rating is leaning more toward 3.5 more than 3. I enjoyed the book. I really don't know how to express my feelings about it yet. But I did enjoyed it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Jones

    I never saw that ending coming!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ribhav Pande

    No books hit as hard. Not even Metamorphosis by Kafka. The allegorical imagery can require interpretation, but it hits hard even without it. When I read Metamorphosis, the emotion was "despair". Orwell isn't about despair. It's plainly about the death of hope. And nothing hits harder than that. Animal Farm Animal Farm and 1984 are contrasted in the foreward to edition, and it's rightly pointed out that Animal Farm was written with more time at hand, but 1984 had to be completed before the end No books hit as hard. Not even Metamorphosis by Kafka. The allegorical imagery can require interpretation, but it hits hard even without it. When I read Metamorphosis, the emotion was "despair". Orwell isn't about despair. It's plainly about the death of hope. And nothing hits harder than that. Animal Farm Animal Farm and 1984 are contrasted in the foreward to edition, and it's rightly pointed out that Animal Farm was written with more time at hand, but 1984 had to be completed before the end of his life which was nearing. The narrations reflect this reality. Animal Farm's imagery makes a huge impact on the reader's mind. Each animal is extremely well chosen for the role that they play in the story. The two distinctive feature of Orwell's narration are: 1) It's a factual narration. There is no undue emphasis of painting a canvas for your imagination beyond what it required – utilitarian maximus 2) Repetition infused with crucial differences, leading to increasingly absurd results The brevity of the book is crucial. The imagery is so powerful and the absurdity so potent that when your hopes are crushed, you won't even have time to lick your wounds. It's like when a doctor distracts you to put an injection, and by the time you realise what's up it's over. 1984 1984 is a book I'd read earlier. The only difference here is that your hope isn't crushed. It is patiently hollowed out so that you're a shell of what you were when you began. 1984 paints a larger universe and has more moving parts. The narration is very fast paced, and the repetition here is of a different kind - it is more systematised than that in Animal Farm. You know how bad it's going to get, so any hope that you have undergoes a deep extraction, unlike being merely dashed as was done in Animal Farm. 1984 is the more popular of Orwell's works, and has gained much significance in India in the recent past. Personally, I picked this up some years ago when a judgment recognising the Right to Privacy came out. "Orwellian" and "Big Brother" kept doing the rounds, so I had to seek out the source to know what it's about. The beauty of both these works is their continuing relevance. No matter where you are on Earth, if you're a part of a controlled system that either good or gone to the dogs, you'll find here something about why that's the way it is. 1984 is also very often quoted, and I made a reference to it while researching on a speech to be made by a judge I was interning with. My takeaway from the book in the context of "language" is reflected in this line that was spoken: "Thoughts are not abstract wisps of consciousness, but are in fact conceptualized and grounded in a particular language along with its unique characteristics. ...In a historically multilingual society like in India, where language is so intrinsic to one’s own self of history and identity– the plurality of language is the plurality of thought itself. George Orwell in his classic 1984 highlighted the significance of language. In his dystopian world, the fictional language “Newspeak” was a controlled language of restricted grammar and limited vocabulary. It was meant to be a vehicle of thought control, meant to limit personal identity, self-expression and free will. For example, the only meaning of the word ‘free’ in Newspeak was to denote the absence of something – this field is free of weeds. Politically, the word was not envisaged to denote free will. Consequently, any such political notion was eliminated from society. Other words that were deliberately omitted from the Newspeak language included justice, science and democracy. Liberty and equality were reduced to a single word – ‘crimethink’ which referred to thought which was considered not in line with the principles of society. This highlighted the political value of controlling language and diversity. " Animal Farm is about the ushering in of a "revolution" that is hijacked, leading to a new regime which is indistinguishable from the old. 1984 is about thought control through pervasive intrusion of the State. As long as society exists, these works will serve as a warning to whoever's listening.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.