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Iraq Since 1958: From Revolution to Dictatorship

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Iraq Since 1958 is the definitive political history of modern Iraq from the fall of the Hashemite monarchy until today. As the world prepares for war, it provides a critical analysis of those issues that have dominated Iraqi affairs over the last half-century and will continue to do so in the years to come -- with or without Saddam Hussein. Iraq Since 1958 covers everything fro Iraq Since 1958 is the definitive political history of modern Iraq from the fall of the Hashemite monarchy until today. As the world prepares for war, it provides a critical analysis of those issues that have dominated Iraqi affairs over the last half-century and will continue to do so in the years to come -- with or without Saddam Hussein. Iraq Since 1958 covers everything from the structure and ideology of the Ba'thist regime that has ruled since 1968, the nature of the Iraqi economy, tribalism, sectarianism, religious divisions within Iraq, long-standing Iraqi foreign policy imperatives, the personality of Saddam Hussein, and the role of the Kurds and the Shi'ites in a country dominated politically by Sunni Muslims.


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Iraq Since 1958 is the definitive political history of modern Iraq from the fall of the Hashemite monarchy until today. As the world prepares for war, it provides a critical analysis of those issues that have dominated Iraqi affairs over the last half-century and will continue to do so in the years to come -- with or without Saddam Hussein. Iraq Since 1958 covers everything fro Iraq Since 1958 is the definitive political history of modern Iraq from the fall of the Hashemite monarchy until today. As the world prepares for war, it provides a critical analysis of those issues that have dominated Iraqi affairs over the last half-century and will continue to do so in the years to come -- with or without Saddam Hussein. Iraq Since 1958 covers everything from the structure and ideology of the Ba'thist regime that has ruled since 1968, the nature of the Iraqi economy, tribalism, sectarianism, religious divisions within Iraq, long-standing Iraqi foreign policy imperatives, the personality of Saddam Hussein, and the role of the Kurds and the Shi'ites in a country dominated politically by Sunni Muslims.

30 review for Iraq Since 1958: From Revolution to Dictatorship

  1. 4 out of 5

    Naeem

    I read chapter 7, "Economy and Society since 1958," and chapter 8, "The War between Iraq and Iran." Another text full of economic tables, numbers, percentages, etc. And the authors are telling a similar story: the relative irrelevance of the state control by various political parties within Iraq compared to the dominant role of the oil industry -- both inside and outside of Iraq. The tone has a bit of a "dependency theory" feel (famous dependency theorists from Latin America are cited along the I read chapter 7, "Economy and Society since 1958," and chapter 8, "The War between Iraq and Iran." Another text full of economic tables, numbers, percentages, etc. And the authors are telling a similar story: the relative irrelevance of the state control by various political parties within Iraq compared to the dominant role of the oil industry -- both inside and outside of Iraq. The tone has a bit of a "dependency theory" feel (famous dependency theorists from Latin America are cited along the way.) The apex of state expenditure on social infrastructure and social services in Iraq lasts from the post oil boom period (1973 onwards) to the beginning of the war with Iran (1980). The author's point out that while the various regimes that took state control from 1958 to 1980 all pursued the goals of social egalitarianism, none of them were really "socialist." Indeed, no only did all of them eventually persecute the very active Iraqi Communist Party, they also operated under the principles of state capitalism. Thus we have state control of the oil industry, state provision of social services, Keynesian style state expenditure on major infrastructure projects -- which are then carried out by private means for the purposes of profit, and state sale of oil on the world market. This "mix" was similar to many third world countries with the difference that no many of them had Iraq's oil. The authors also make an important point: when revenues, rather than emerging from the labor of the people, emerge instead from foreign aid (Egypt, pre-PDPA Afghanistan) or from the external sale of oil (Saudi Arabia, Iraq), the state has no reason to stay connected to the society. The state moves from being a immanent actor to transcending the needs and connections with the local. Tough reading but the structural analysis is sharp.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fawn

    This book is extremely dry and hard to get through. I was trying to find some interesting stories of Iraq and Baghdad - but the book is written in such a scholarly way that I couldn’t hardly understand it. If you like scholarly writing, you’ll love this book. Just be aware it’s written like a verbal timeline.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    A useful and interesting overview, but also a sedative.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tamer

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Pettus

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Payton

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Akers

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amir

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cj

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Northcutt

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mikah

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Garver

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ajay

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lukáš Meravý

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brado

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rudi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liam Armstrong

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Fontaine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aladdin Elaasar

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Hacthoun

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  22. 4 out of 5

    Megan Mcswain

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emma Barko

  26. 4 out of 5

    Saman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Sando

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arjun Mishra

  29. 5 out of 5

    Garrison

  30. 4 out of 5

    Yesha

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