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The Spear of Tyranny

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The unforgettable sequel to By Dawn's Early Light. A tale of faith, love, terror- and hope. It seems like a dream come true. Especially to a world ravaged by war and exhausted by drought. Especially to a society grown fearful from widespread crime and mystified by mass disappearances and unprovoked animal attacks. And especially to a young Israeli couple devastated by their The unforgettable sequel to By Dawn's Early Light. A tale of faith, love, terror- and hope. It seems like a dream come true. Especially to a world ravaged by war and exhausted by drought. Especially to a society grown fearful from widespread crime and mystified by mass disappearances and unprovoked animal attacks. And especially to a young Israeli couple devastated by their own, very personal loss and unable to reach out to each other in their private pain. After centuries of war and decades of crime, the prospect of international harmony is tantalizing the tiny nation of Israel. After millennia of waiting, the prospect of a rebuilt Temple on Jerusalem's holy mount seems a miraculous gift. And to Israeli Major Isaac Ben-David, disillusioned by loss and hungry for meaning, the opportunity to work for peace is all but irresistible. Isaac's opportunity lies with Adrian Romulus, the president of the European Union Council of Ministers. He's a charismatic, visionary world leader with a workable plan for solving the world's problems. Tall, handsome, and deeply spiritual, he is also personally interested in the nation of Israel. Everyone agrees he's a man who can bring peace to a troubled world. But why do thoughts of Romulus trouble Isaac's wife, Sarah, an Israeli security officer? How can Romulus know Isaac and Sarah's most private secrets? And why is he so obsessed with an ancient spearhead in an Austrian museum? Just who is Adrian Romulus, anyway? And what are his plans for Isaac Ben-David-and the world?


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The unforgettable sequel to By Dawn's Early Light. A tale of faith, love, terror- and hope. It seems like a dream come true. Especially to a world ravaged by war and exhausted by drought. Especially to a society grown fearful from widespread crime and mystified by mass disappearances and unprovoked animal attacks. And especially to a young Israeli couple devastated by their The unforgettable sequel to By Dawn's Early Light. A tale of faith, love, terror- and hope. It seems like a dream come true. Especially to a world ravaged by war and exhausted by drought. Especially to a society grown fearful from widespread crime and mystified by mass disappearances and unprovoked animal attacks. And especially to a young Israeli couple devastated by their own, very personal loss and unable to reach out to each other in their private pain. After centuries of war and decades of crime, the prospect of international harmony is tantalizing the tiny nation of Israel. After millennia of waiting, the prospect of a rebuilt Temple on Jerusalem's holy mount seems a miraculous gift. And to Israeli Major Isaac Ben-David, disillusioned by loss and hungry for meaning, the opportunity to work for peace is all but irresistible. Isaac's opportunity lies with Adrian Romulus, the president of the European Union Council of Ministers. He's a charismatic, visionary world leader with a workable plan for solving the world's problems. Tall, handsome, and deeply spiritual, he is also personally interested in the nation of Israel. Everyone agrees he's a man who can bring peace to a troubled world. But why do thoughts of Romulus trouble Isaac's wife, Sarah, an Israeli security officer? How can Romulus know Isaac and Sarah's most private secrets? And why is he so obsessed with an ancient spearhead in an Austrian museum? Just who is Adrian Romulus, anyway? And what are his plans for Isaac Ben-David-and the world?

40 review for The Spear of Tyranny

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    I've always enjoyed series stories more than standalone ones. Even as a kid, I remember coming to the end of a novel, and, even though all the plot threads were neatly wrapped up, I still wanted to know what happened to the characters afterwards. That may be due to a sitcom-filled childhood; I don't know. No series needs to go on forever, though; as enjoyable as numerous tales (of any kind and/or genre) within the same universe can be, it usually gets to a point where it "jumps the shark," and i I've always enjoyed series stories more than standalone ones. Even as a kid, I remember coming to the end of a novel, and, even though all the plot threads were neatly wrapped up, I still wanted to know what happened to the characters afterwards. That may be due to a sitcom-filled childhood; I don't know. No series needs to go on forever, though; as enjoyable as numerous tales (of any kind and/or genre) within the same universe can be, it usually gets to a point where it "jumps the shark," and is all downhill from there. What's especially disappointing is when a popular series has a long-awaited installment that is disappointing. That was the case with The Phantom Menace; as much hype as the first Star Wars prequel got, many people (NOT including me) were not happy with it. I did find Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows to be an utter travesty, though; to me, it seemed like J. K. Rowling just rushed through it so she could say, "Here; now, leave me alone!" You may wonder what any of that has to do with The Spear of Tyranny. Well, I'll tell you: Like HP7, it was a completely blasé finish to what had been an excellent and intruding saga up to that point. Some may quibble with Ms. Hunt and Mr. Jeffrey's depiction of end-times events, but that wasn't an issue for me. What was an issue was the writing style, particularly the stilted dialogue. Having a married man repeatedly called "husband" by his wife, as if that were a title like "Mom" or "Dad," made things quite clunky. Add an underwhelming ending that left me hanging, as well as some rather gruesome sequences involving people being violently attacked, usually by animals, and "The Spear of Tyranny" has got to be the most disappointing literary finale I've read since the last adventure of "The Boy Who Lived."

  2. 4 out of 5

    LadyCalico

    Definitely the weakest book of the trilogy--definitely not a page turner until near the end. I was going to give this book two stars until it started picking up about 2/3 of the way through. I was also disappointed it just dropped the main characters from the previous books, except for the villains and Rabbi Cohen. Some mention should have been made of Sam, Mike, Daniel, and Lauren's disappearance and what effect their absence has on this story (besides depleting it of interest.) Let's just assu Definitely the weakest book of the trilogy--definitely not a page turner until near the end. I was going to give this book two stars until it started picking up about 2/3 of the way through. I was also disappointed it just dropped the main characters from the previous books, except for the villains and Rabbi Cohen. Some mention should have been made of Sam, Mike, Daniel, and Lauren's disappearance and what effect their absence has on this story (besides depleting it of interest.) Let's just assume they were raptured, what's happening with Devorah and Asher in the midst of Jacob's troubles? How are things back in the good old USA with idiots like Blackstone and Electra in charge? It seemed a shame to just forget about some interesting characters and sub-plots when the ones who replaced them were so dumb,dull, and lifeless. For about 200 repetitious pages that went no where, I just kept saying, "Alright already, you've set the stage, now get on with it." I guess that's what frustrated me about the failure to tie up the potentially interesting loose ends from the previous books and characters--there was so much room within the 200 pages of empty verbage in order to do so--opportunity wasted. I gave it a four only in view of the series as a whole and finally getting around to some action in the last third.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leia

    Great blend of fiction and Biblical prophecy complete with scriptural references. I also enjoyed learning more about Jewish beliefs and how their expectations of the coming Messiah differ so much from Christian/Biblical prophecy of the Messiah's return. Overall an easy to follow, interesting, and educational read. Written as a sequel (that I haven't read) in 2000 - but relevant and entertaining today.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lidija Ivanek

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gail

  6. 4 out of 5

    Miaismine

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Davis

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Maureen Sutlive Taylor

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  11. 5 out of 5

    Evan Roberts

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda Hunt

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gary Bright

  14. 4 out of 5

    William B

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Mullins

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dominic

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steven Golden

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom Haddox

  20. 4 out of 5

    Debra Kobes

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deb Leininger

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bron

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sally Pratt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  26. 4 out of 5

    Candi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Belinda Kostelec

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  29. 5 out of 5

    TypeFace

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paitsgreekgirl

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

  32. 4 out of 5

    Katz!

  33. 4 out of 5

    JenBW

  34. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  35. 5 out of 5

    Eurileth Dela

  36. 5 out of 5

    David

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kathi Klann

  38. 5 out of 5

    Lawana

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Piper

  40. 5 out of 5

    Ben

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