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As sons of a Muslim muazzein (Islamic cleric), the Caner brothers have first-hand knowledge of the major beliefs and daily practices of Islamic life. Now Christians, the Caners are in a unique position to present an insider s look at Muslim beliefs. In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doct As sons of a Muslim muazzein (Islamic cleric), the Caner brothers have first-hand knowledge of the major beliefs and daily practices of Islamic life. Now Christians, the Caners are in a unique position to present an insider s look at Muslim beliefs. In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doctrine and the religion s impact on daily life. Western readers will find this candid presentation extraordinarily helpful. Unveiling Islam covers the entire scope of Islam—its practices, ethics, and beliefs. It explains the Jihad, sects within Islam, and how Islam can be used to justify violence when one of its primary tenets is peace. The final two chapters show how Islam views Christianity and how Christians can open understanding dialogue with Muslims.


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As sons of a Muslim muazzein (Islamic cleric), the Caner brothers have first-hand knowledge of the major beliefs and daily practices of Islamic life. Now Christians, the Caners are in a unique position to present an insider s look at Muslim beliefs. In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doct As sons of a Muslim muazzein (Islamic cleric), the Caner brothers have first-hand knowledge of the major beliefs and daily practices of Islamic life. Now Christians, the Caners are in a unique position to present an insider s look at Muslim beliefs. In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doctrine and the religion s impact on daily life. Western readers will find this candid presentation extraordinarily helpful. Unveiling Islam covers the entire scope of Islam—its practices, ethics, and beliefs. It explains the Jihad, sects within Islam, and how Islam can be used to justify violence when one of its primary tenets is peace. The final two chapters show how Islam views Christianity and how Christians can open understanding dialogue with Muslims.

30 review for Unveiling Islam: An Insider's Look at Muslim Life and Beliefs

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    This is taken from the Foreword by Richard Land, I agree with his endorsement of this book. "In the aftermath of the horrific terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001, Christians have searched for a trustworthy guide to the unfamiliar and suddenly threatening world of Islam. The author's Ergun and Emir Caner are trophies of God's grace- once devout followers of Allah, now of Jesus of Nazareth. Their story is both a compelling example of God's love and a sobering and informative trip through the w This is taken from the Foreword by Richard Land, I agree with his endorsement of this book. "In the aftermath of the horrific terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001, Christians have searched for a trustworthy guide to the unfamiliar and suddenly threatening world of Islam. The author's Ergun and Emir Caner are trophies of God's grace- once devout followers of Allah, now of Jesus of Nazareth. Their story is both a compelling example of God's love and a sobering and informative trip through the world of Islam. "Unveiling Islam" is exactly what the subtitle describes; it is an insider's look at Muslim life and beliefs which will do much to inform, challenge and inspire Christians. The Caner's compelling story reminds us of the severe, often bloody, persecution faced today by fellow Christian's around the world, who have come to understand that all faiths are NOT the same, but that Jesus is "the way, the truth, and the life." (John 14 vs 6) I have read a few Christian books about Islam but this one stands out as being a thorough examination of all aspects of Muslim life and practice that a Christian seeking to witness would need to know. Indeed, the last chapter is entitled "Inside the Muslim: Earning a Hearing and Winning a Soul." This was not light reading and could be used more as a reference or a study aide for those living amongst and seeking to reach out to Muslims. I believe that any Christian who is serious about this type of evangelism should read this book (or a similar one) as it is essential to have a basic understanding of Islam in order to converse with a Muslim. This book is very useful as it compares Christianity and Islam from the perspective of Muslims that have turned to Jesus. The authors are obviously placing themselves at great personal risk by writing this book and Christians should definitely use the inside knowledge that can be gained through reading it. I would highly recommend this book for all Christians and especially for those working amongst Muslims. It is clean; free of bad language, there are mentions of violence and sexual references but not in graphic detail.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    This book is written by two brothers who converted to Christianity. As a result, it's very biased against Islam and does not give a realistic picture of what Islam is and why it is the fastest growing religion. If you want to learn about Islam, read a book written by a Muslim. I read this when I was first studying Islam and it was clear to me at that time that it doesn't really explain Islam or give an insider's view of what it's like to be a Muslim...how can someone who is now on the outside gi This book is written by two brothers who converted to Christianity. As a result, it's very biased against Islam and does not give a realistic picture of what Islam is and why it is the fastest growing religion. If you want to learn about Islam, read a book written by a Muslim. I read this when I was first studying Islam and it was clear to me at that time that it doesn't really explain Islam or give an insider's view of what it's like to be a Muslim...how can someone who is now on the outside give a balanced, fair picture of Islam?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl Tribble

    TLDR version of this monster – average outsider book on Islam, but I think their suggested Christian defenses sometimes focus too much on man instead of God. As others have pointed out, this is a Christian book on Islam, although I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would think otherwise. The description on the back cover of my copy ends with, “the authors then present a practical strategy Christians can use to open a productive dialogue with Muslims,” which makes it about as clear as possible what the a TLDR version of this monster – average outsider book on Islam, but I think their suggested Christian defenses sometimes focus too much on man instead of God. As others have pointed out, this is a Christian book on Islam, although I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would think otherwise. The description on the back cover of my copy ends with, “the authors then present a practical strategy Christians can use to open a productive dialogue with Muslims,” which makes it about as clear as possible what the authors were trying to accomplish. Not really sure I think they accomplished their goals, and IMHO, some of the back cover description is an exaggeration, particularly the “raised as Sunni Muslims” and “lived the Muslim life” parts, since the boys were raised by their non-Muslim mother, had a “weekend” relationship with their Muslim father, and they both converted to Christianity before they could legally drive. A teenager living in a non-Christian family can certainly be a Christian, but they’re not exactly immersed in Christian culture, and I would assume the same is true of Muslim teens. So while the Caners may have identified as Muslim, they weren’t the typical Muslim the back cover implies. For the most part the Caners present the same info on Islam that I’ve gotten from other secular, Christian, and Islamic sources, although I believe they’re incorrect in arguing that “Islam… teaches that Judas, not Jesus, was crucified,” since so far as I can tell, all the Quaran says is that “they did not kill him, nor did they crucify him; but [another] was made to resemble him to them.” (Surah 4:157) Some Muslims do believe the substitute was Judas, but I’ve seen Simon of Cyrene or some other disciple suggested as well. I find it ironic that the Caners repeatedly point out that Islam has as many divisions as Christianity, while at the same time presenting the occasional idea that is disputed as being “Islamic”. Best I can tell, Islam, like Christianity, has some core beliefs that all true believers follow, surrounded by an enormous amount of minor theological differences even among the true believers, and on the far edges are a couple of fringe groups (the Nation of Islam, for a Muslim example, or the Mormons for Christians) who deny the fundamental tenants of the faith but still want to claim the label of “Islam” or “Christianity.” Islamic groups tend to be structured more like the Amish or Mennonite Christians, without a multi-level hierarchy, where each particular congregation can have its own spin on things, which in all three groups makes these differences less obvious to outsiders, and less likely to lead to the creation of new “denominations” over minor issues (although new congregations are common). Still, although the debates are between smaller communities, the minor differences still exist, and the disagreement over who was substituted for Jesus is one of those in Islam. But that’s a trivial complaint. Where I think this book is weakest is in its stated goal – Christians opening “a productive dialogue with Muslims.” They start out stating Muslims believe that “Allah is everyone’s god. No one has a choice of the god they serve. No one has the right to call anyone or anything else god, and to do so is an unforgivable sin if not repented.” Then they recommend that the Christian first establish that “Christians and Muslims do not worship the same God.” But Christians believe that *their* God is the true God everyone owes allegiance to, and that rejecting that True God is an unforgivable sin if not repented. The big three monotheistic religions – Muslim, Christian, and Jewish – all make that claim; that’s why non-monotheists find them so annoying. I suppose a liberal Christian who sees the Bible as primarily symbolic could have a brief theological conversation with a liberal Muslim who doesn’t take the Quran any more seriously, and they might both walk away thinking they believe in the same god, but in my experience any serious Muslim and Christian holding a theological discussion of any depth at all will quickly figure out they’re following very, very different gods. Muslims may insist, “we believe in the God of the Bible, we just know more about Him,” but any Muslim who knows anything about Christians – namely, that we believe Christ is part of the God head – must really mean, “We believe in the True God who inspired the inerrant Bible, but you guys have been deluded by the corruptions in the Bible into following a false god.” Maybe there are American Muslims who don’t actually see Christian beliefs as a huge offense against Allah, but the Muslims I have talked to definitely see the Christian god as “another Jesus,” to use the pertinent Biblical phrase. Since the Muslims I’ve actually talked religion with generally figure out all by their lonesome that Christians and Muslims don’t worship the same god, I found that advice kinda pointless. The Caners go on to add five more points Muslims would likely hold, with their recommended defense, some of which I find weak. For instance, they say that Muslims believe, “The true Christian gospel has been changed” and recommend that the Christian respond with the historical evidence “that affirms Christianity.” But I say, why get into “my historian is better than yours” when you can point back at scripture? The Quran says that Muhammad is mentioned in the Bible. "Those who follow the Apostle, the unlettered Prophet, whom they find mentioned in their own (Scriptures) - in the Law and the Gospel. " Surah 7.157 But I have read the Bible cover to cover, and while the Old Testament is full of Jesus, I have found no hint of Mohammed. For example, many Muslims claim that Muhammad was predicted in the Bible as the “prophet like Moses” foretold in Deuteronomy 18:18: "I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their brethren; and I will put my words in his mouth, and he shall speak to them all that I command him". Deuteronomy 18.18 But they ignore the rest of the passage, particularly verses 15 & 16 "The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your brethren - him you shall heed - just as you desired of the Lord your God at Horeb on the day of the assembly, when you said, 'Let me not hear again the voice of the Lord my God or see this great fire any more, lest I die' ". Deuteronomy 18.15-16. The prophet in Deuteronomy 18:18 will be like Moses in that he will see God face to face, and serve as a mediator between God and the Israelites. Did Muhammad see God face to face? No. Did Jesus? Yes. Did Muhammad claim to be mediator between the people and God, protecting the people from God’s wrath? No. Did Jesus? Yes. Or how about some other discussions of the prophet like Moses in Deuteronomy, like this one: "And there has not arisen a prophet since in Israel like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face, none like him for all the signs and wonders which the Lord sent him to do in the land of Egypt, to Pharaoh and to all his servants and to all his land, and for all the mighty power and all the great and terrible deeds which Moses performed in the sight of all Israel." Deuteronomy 34.10-12. Did Muhammad present “signs and wonders” like those of Moses? No. Did Jesus? Yes. For example, Moses fed the Israelites with manna – when Jesus performed “the miracle of the 5000,” feeding over 5000 people with five loaves of barley and two fish, the Jews exclaimed, “'This is indeed the prophet who is to come into the world.” (John 6:14) Other prophets had power over rivers, but only Moses (Exodus 14.21), and Jesus (Matthew 8.27, Mark 4:39), had power over a sea. And so on. For that matter, all through the Bible God verifies his prophets by foretelling the future – mostly “If you do not repent, this will happen” kind of stuff, but also some quite extensive prophecies that look far into the future. Jeremiah 31:38-40, for instance, not only predicts that the Jews will one day return to Jerusalem and form a nation there – it outlines how the city will expand, with specific markers like the tower of Hananel, the hill Gareb, Goah, the valley of ashes, the fields as far as the brook Kidron, and the corner of the Horse Gate toward the east. Zechariah 14:10 adds Benjamin’s Gate, First Gate, Corner Gate, the king’s wine presses. Modern archeologists can’t identify all of these points for sure, but enough of them are still known to make it clear that modern-day Jerusalem is indeed filling in these spaces, in order. So these prophecies, written long before the time of Christ, were at least partially fulfilled in the twentieth and twenty-first century. By the same token, Jesus said Capernaum “will descend to hades” – Capernaum was destroyed in an earthquake in 400 AD. Jesus also spoke against Capernaum’s sister cities, Chorazin and Bethsaida, which are both long gone as well. But the last sister city, Tiberias, which was not condemned, still stands these 2000 years later. There's also the fact that Daniel, in the days of Babylon, tells the Babylonian king in symbolic terms that the Babylonians will be conquered by the Medo-Persians, the Medo-Persians by the Greeks, and the Greeks by the Romans, and that, in the days of the Roman kings, a “stone not cut by human hands” will smash the rest of the kingdoms and become a new kingdom that will grow to fill all the world. (Daniel 2) Clearly the “smashing” of the kingdoms is not about military conquest – all the nations except Rome have already been conquered by the time the rock smashes them. The last kingdom is a spiritual kingdom, that will smash the gods of the nations that went before. So the “stone not cut by humans hands” in Daniel 2 is the Christian Church, which, as it has grown to reach every nation on earth, has done in nearly all the gods of the nations mentioned (Zoroastrianism is still around, last I checked, although it’s also arguably a spin off of Judaism). That's a pretty specific Biblical prophecy, part of which was fulfilled in New Testament times, that contradicts Islam. While the Old Testament is filled with prophecies regarding Jesus Christ, I have yet to run across one clearly pointing to Muhammad. And I have yet to see any prophecy from the Quran that foretells something that happens long, long after Muhammad is gone, except vague repetitions of the much more specific Biblical prophecies. So, while I would certainly point out that even unbelieving historians support the historical accuracy of the our copies of the Old and New Testaments, I would also say, “all through the Bible, God demonstrates his presence via prophecy, recognizing the prophecy won’t make any difference to those who reject Him, but giving that proof ‘for those who have ears to hear.’ If Mohammad was Allah’s greatest prophet, why are his prophecies so weak? Why does the Old Testament foretell the coming of Christ, in such detail that unwary Jews will accuse Christians of quoting the New Testament when they share Isaiah 52:12 through 53:12, but no verses that clearly foretell Mohammad?” I guess my real problem with the Caners suggested defense is that they focus on man instead of God. As they themselves point out, the fundamental disagreement between Muslims and Christians is which god is the right one; the one in the Bible, or the one in the Quran. When dealing with people who already recognize that there is a God, and that the Bible has some validity, why take the focus off that issue?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zann

    This book is directed at the Christian reader who would like to learn about Islam including history, cultural differences between East and West, as well as differences between what is taught in the Qur'an vs. the Bible, differences between Allah and the Christian God and more. The book was written by two brothers who were raised to be Muslim then later converted to Christianity. Both men are highly educated: one is a Professor of Theology and Church History while the other is an Assistant Profes This book is directed at the Christian reader who would like to learn about Islam including history, cultural differences between East and West, as well as differences between what is taught in the Qur'an vs. the Bible, differences between Allah and the Christian God and more. The book was written by two brothers who were raised to be Muslim then later converted to Christianity. Both men are highly educated: one is a Professor of Theology and Church History while the other is an Assistant Professor of Church History and Anabaptist Studies. I found the book to be surprisingly fair in assessing the good, the bad and the ugly of both Christianity and Islam, though of course the authors promote Christianity over Islam in many instances which is to be expected. At the back of the book are three appendixes. They are: A Topical Index to the Qur'an Free Will, Fatalism and the Qur'an Christianity and Islam: A Comparison of Beliefs A Glossary of Arabic Islamic Terms I found all to be very interesting and helpful. Unveiling Islam is really not a very long book at 251 pages including the appendixes, but there is a lot packed into those pages.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rod Horncastle

    This is one of the better books I've read discussing Islam from a Christian point of view. If you are not a Christian I would hesitate to recommend this. But as far as getting inside the religion of Islam: this says basically the same thing as the many other books I've read. But very clearly. Its a quick journey through the life of Muslim's, so don't expect endless details. You get just enough to know how dangerous this religion is to the rest of the world. Be prepared to lose all of your valued This is one of the better books I've read discussing Islam from a Christian point of view. If you are not a Christian I would hesitate to recommend this. But as far as getting inside the religion of Islam: this says basically the same thing as the many other books I've read. But very clearly. Its a quick journey through the life of Muslim's, so don't expect endless details. You get just enough to know how dangerous this religion is to the rest of the world. Be prepared to lose all of your valued freedoms if Islam has the impact it is fighting for.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I'd have a hard time recommending this book. The authors have an agenda, and they are very up front about it. They don't have anything nice to say about Islam, and if you are already afraid of Muslims, this book will add fuel to that fire. That said, I'd like the opportunity to talk to a Muslim about some of the claims the authors make. I'd have a hard time recommending this book. The authors have an agenda, and they are very up front about it. They don't have anything nice to say about Islam, and if you are already afraid of Muslims, this book will add fuel to that fire. That said, I'd like the opportunity to talk to a Muslim about some of the claims the authors make.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    The Caners, now teaching at Liberty and SEBTS, converted to Christianity from Islam while in their late teens. Their book is easy to read and covers crucial issues, all with an eye toward evangelism.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christina Jones

    In my opinion it felt biased, written by a convert to Christianity.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    I finally finished this. It's a long read not because it's a big book but because it's so full of info. I needed lots of time between readings to digest. I learned tons from this book and it will be a very valuable resource should a Muslim ever enter my life. The biggest take-away info for me was this: Yes Christians as well as Muslims have behaved deplorably through the ages. The Christians murdered many Muslims during the Crusades and the Muslims have killed and persecuted Christians aplenty. B I finally finished this. It's a long read not because it's a big book but because it's so full of info. I needed lots of time between readings to digest. I learned tons from this book and it will be a very valuable resource should a Muslim ever enter my life. The biggest take-away info for me was this: Yes Christians as well as Muslims have behaved deplorably through the ages. The Christians murdered many Muslims during the Crusades and the Muslims have killed and persecuted Christians aplenty. But if you go back to each group's holy books (Bible and Koran) you can see clearly the stance of each group's leader (Jesus and Muhammed). Muhammed condoned and encouraged this behavior. Muhammed said to kill the infidel. One example, surah 9:29, "Fight those who believe not in Allah." Jesus said, "love the enemy. Do good to those who persecute you." "Blessed are the peacemakers." When "Christians" fought the Crusades they acted contrary to the teachings of Jesus. Jesus shed His blood so others could come to God. Muhammad shed others' blood to expand the Islamic kingdom. Jesus taught love and peace. Muhammed taught war and aggression. "War is not a side bar of history for Islam; it is the main vehicle for religious expansion. It is the Muslim duty to bring world peace via the sword." Muslims are taught by the Koran and Allah's messenger to "fight and slay the Pagans wherever you find them." (surah 9:5) Christians are taught to live at peace by Jesus and the Bible. If I forget most of what I read in this book, and I probably will, I don't thing I'll forget this most critical issue. Jesus was/is all about love, peace, mercy. Muhammed was very wrapped up in violence. This is a very informative book and one that any Christian, especially one who has a Muslim friend or such, will benefit from.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Don Murphy

    2 former Muslims (3 brothers covert to Christianity, get Ph.Ds, and travel the country giving speeches. Sounds like the beginning of a good joke!) write a book exlaining to Westerners how the religion works. Well, not quite. At the end of every chapter (practially literally, they might have forgotten one), these two take the time out to explain/show/'prove' why Christainity is 'better' than Islam and why Christianity is the 'true' faith. Um... sure. Obviously, they don't want to give an explanat 2 former Muslims (3 brothers covert to Christianity, get Ph.Ds, and travel the country giving speeches. Sounds like the beginning of a good joke!) write a book exlaining to Westerners how the religion works. Well, not quite. At the end of every chapter (practially literally, they might have forgotten one), these two take the time out to explain/show/'prove' why Christainity is 'better' than Islam and why Christianity is the 'true' faith. Um... sure. Obviously, they don't want to give an explanation of the faith as more as 'compare' it to Christianity and then bash it to shreds. It's not until page 206 do they give their real underlying reason for writing the book: Entice Westerners read the Bible and become more invested/interested in their faith. Instead of explaining some interesing points about Islam (they use both a lunar and solar calendar - how and why? Not explored), they try to point out the flaws and give arugmentative points 'for' Christianity (eg, 'why' the Qaran can't be the 'only' true word of God). They do cover/explain the various sects of Islam, but not extremely deeply (they simply say Sikhs are 'not' Muslims, for instance, and never really explain why not). It's no wonder why ther father disowned them - they claim it's expected for a Muslim to disown anyone who turns his back on Islam, but after reading what these guys say about their former faith, I wouldn't want to admit that I knew them eitehr!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dianne Flavian

    Very informative if you really want to know the proper way to reach out to the Muslim. There are very useful tips in ways to start a dialog without being unknowingly offensive. Essentially, how to reach out with the love that Jesus embodies. There is a very informative chapter that addresses the popular idea that everyone prays to the same god. I recommend this book for Christians who want a better understanding of Islam or Muslims who want to begin a comparative study of the two religions

  12. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Excellent book from ex-Muslim,Christian brothers about the beliefs of Islam. The Caner brothers are masters of explaining the whys and wherefores of this growing religion and what Christians need to know about these people who need a Savior.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    A very informative overview of Islam from Muhammed to the present by two former Muslims. It also is a great resource for Christians who wish to be a more effective witness to Muslims.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    This was a very infomative book. It was also written so someone with limited knowledge on the subject could understand it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Taneil Linschied

    This was a really great, and eye-opening book. Definitely for older audiences, although that may be obvious. Otherwise, definitely read it!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I couldn't put this one down. Moved me to tears and gave me new direction in my prayer life....opened my eyes to a whole new understanding of Islam. I couldn't put this one down. Moved me to tears and gave me new direction in my prayer life....opened my eyes to a whole new understanding of Islam.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Too Christian- biased, too annoying to finish.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy Clark

    This informative book was written by brothers who were raised Muslim and later became Christians. Both are now academics. Among others, they make these points about Islam: 1. Allah is not the God revealed by Jesus. Allah doesn’t love everybody; he only loves you if you love him first. 2. The Hadith and Sunnah are sacred books in addition to the Qur’an. The Hadith in particular lays out rules for living. There are rules for every aspect of life. 3. Islam is based on works. At the last judgment, you This informative book was written by brothers who were raised Muslim and later became Christians. Both are now academics. Among others, they make these points about Islam: 1. Allah is not the God revealed by Jesus. Allah doesn’t love everybody; he only loves you if you love him first. 2. The Hadith and Sunnah are sacred books in addition to the Qur’an. The Hadith in particular lays out rules for living. There are rules for every aspect of life. 3. Islam is based on works. At the last judgment, your good and bad deeds are placed on a balance, and if you’re at least 51% good, you have a chance at Paradise. Muhammad himself expressed doubt that he would make it. There is no forgiveness unless you die on jihad. 4. In addition to your good works, you need Allah’s mercy to enter Paradise. 5. Dying as a martyr on a jihad is the only guarantee of Paradise. Jihad martyrs get additional perks in Paradise such as their own house and beautiful virgins. 6. Islam is not a religion of peace. The authors quote sura after sura that urge Muslims to kill infidels. Muslims who live at peace at home are specifically mentioned as inferior. “Islam does in fact have an essential and indispensable tenet of militaristic conquest.” 7. Freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and press “are completely foreign to the traditions of Islam and are regularly condemned by Muslims wordwide.” 8. Women are genetically inferior to men, physically and mentally. Women are unclean by nature and a bad omen. Women cannot participate in jihad. Hell is full of women. 9. Muslim hell is worse than the “Christian” version of hell. 10. Muslims pray five times a day, but this prayer is not communication between god and man. It’s a prescribed ritual.

  19. 5 out of 5

    R

    Ergun and Emir Caner laid out the basic beliefs of Islam in an easy to read book. They introduced many of the chapters with a real-life example of people and their misunderstanding of Islam and then explained the basic tenants of Islam often comparing Islam to Christianity. If you are looking for an introductory understanding of Islam this book is helpful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Chambers

    If you a not a Christian you will not like or understand this book It is about evangelism and the Bible’s command in Matthew 28:19 “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” NIV

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Gunter

    An interesting and useful book. I admit to skimming some of the chapters towards the back that I felt merely restated points already made.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    A good introductory book. I'm saddened by the vast numbers without God's truth and the vast numbers who have God's truth but don't really know it or share it. A good introductory book. I'm saddened by the vast numbers without God's truth and the vast numbers who have God's truth but don't really know it or share it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

    Informative.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lou Alice

    Somewhat educational

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    I read because my son was reading it for a class. It was interesting. The class had a very strong bias. If I want a better understanding I would want to read other material.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I've met the author who is an excellent speaker. This was an interesting perspective! Happy Reading! I've met the author who is an excellent speaker. This was an interesting perspective! Happy Reading!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dave Lester

    'Unveiling Islam' seems like a decent introduction to the Islamic faith from two former Muslim brothers who converted to Christianity. I have read some reviews that criticize the book for being biased toward Christianity. Well....yes, it is and that fact is not hidden at all throughout the work. The authors believe that Christianity is true and that Islam is a false religion. Again, there is nothing at all that is hidden regarding Ergun Mehmet Caner and Emir Fethi Caner (the authors) belief syst 'Unveiling Islam' seems like a decent introduction to the Islamic faith from two former Muslim brothers who converted to Christianity. I have read some reviews that criticize the book for being biased toward Christianity. Well....yes, it is and that fact is not hidden at all throughout the work. The authors believe that Christianity is true and that Islam is a false religion. Again, there is nothing at all that is hidden regarding Ergun Mehmet Caner and Emir Fethi Caner (the authors) belief system. One of their goals is to help Christians understand Islam better and by the end of the book, they are discussing various points of conversation in order to articulate the Christian faith to Muslims. Outside of that, the work briefly (through 234 pages in the paperback) outlines basic Islamic belief and key moments of history within the Islamic faith. A discussion also develops about different traditions of Islam including the Sunni's, Shia and Kurds. An understanding is presented about different Islamic holidays including Ramadan. For someone who really wants to study Islam in depth, I would recommend more thorough sources and also some works by actual Muslims. However, this is a fairly good primer which serves as an introduction (not so much in depth) to a lot of Muslim beliefs, practices and traditions.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sasha (bahareads)

    I giving this 5 stars. "In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doctrine and the religion s impact on daily life. Western readers will find this candid presentation extraordinarily helpful. Unveiling Islam covers the entire scope of Islam�its practices, ethics, and beliefs. It explains the Jihad, sects within Islam, and how Islam can be used to justify violence when one of its primary tenets is peace. The final two I giving this 5 stars. "In a sympathetic yet honest presentation, the Caner brothers offer clear explanations of what is and what is not Islamic doctrine and the religion s impact on daily life. Western readers will find this candid presentation extraordinarily helpful. Unveiling Islam covers the entire scope of Islam�its practices, ethics, and beliefs. It explains the Jihad, sects within Islam, and how Islam can be used to justify violence when one of its primary tenets is peace. The final two chapters show how Islam views Christianity and how Christians can open understanding dialogue with Muslims." - Goodreads This was written by two former Muslims brothers. I really enjoyed the simplicity of the book. It was easy to read and understand. This book was eye opening. I really enjoyed it. I would suggest you read this if 1. you want to know more about Islam 2. If you want to have sensible open dialogues with Muslims.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Written by two brothers who grew up in the world of Islam (and who's father and family still practice), this is an authoritative look at the ins and outs of the faith. Both brothers now hold doctorate degrees in religion, and can slowly peel apart the many layers of Islam, read it in the original language, and decipher deep spiritual truths for Christians in the Western world. This book was given to me by a friend during a time that I was struggling with the idea of Islam, and became a highly im Written by two brothers who grew up in the world of Islam (and who's father and family still practice), this is an authoritative look at the ins and outs of the faith. Both brothers now hold doctorate degrees in religion, and can slowly peel apart the many layers of Islam, read it in the original language, and decipher deep spiritual truths for Christians in the Western world. This book was given to me by a friend during a time that I was struggling with the idea of Islam, and became a highly important read for me and my personal faith.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mikhail

    As a polemical text, I suppose this book serves its purpose. If your goal is to ignite Crusader-like disdain for the barbarian faith of Saracen hordes, then this text is a good introductory book, as it endeavours to portray itself as unbiased fairly well. However, as an examination of Islam, it is a horribly unnuanced look at a religion of a billion people, which doesn't really have a set-in-stone standard version. If you actually want to learn about Islam, this book is not a good place to start As a polemical text, I suppose this book serves its purpose. If your goal is to ignite Crusader-like disdain for the barbarian faith of Saracen hordes, then this text is a good introductory book, as it endeavours to portray itself as unbiased fairly well. However, as an examination of Islam, it is a horribly unnuanced look at a religion of a billion people, which doesn't really have a set-in-stone standard version. If you actually want to learn about Islam, this book is not a good place to start. In fact, there is no point in reading this book at all.

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