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Amanda Hesser, co-founder and CEO of Food52 and former New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and expertise to this compendium of influential and delicious recipes from chefs, home cooks, and food writers. Devoted Times subscribers will find the many treasured recipes they have cooked for years—Plum Torte, David Eyre's Pancake, Pamela Sherrid's Summer Pa Amanda Hesser, co-founder and CEO of Food52 and former New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and expertise to this compendium of influential and delicious recipes from chefs, home cooks, and food writers. Devoted Times subscribers will find the many treasured recipes they have cooked for years—Plum Torte, David Eyre's Pancake, Pamela Sherrid's Summer Pasta—as well as favorites from the early Craig Claiborne New York Times Cookbook and a host of other classics—from 1940s Caesar salad and 1960s flourless chocolate cake to today's fava bean salad and no-knead bread. Hesser has cooked and updated every one of the 1,000-plus recipes here. Her chapter introductions showcase the history of American cooking, and her witty and fascinating headnotes share what makes each recipe special. The Essential New York Times Cookbook is for people who grew up in the kitchen with Claiborne, for curious cooks who want to serve a nineteenth-century raspberry granita to their friends, and for the new cook who needs a book that explains everything from how to roll out dough to how to slow-roast fish—a volume that will serve as a lifelong companion.


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Amanda Hesser, co-founder and CEO of Food52 and former New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and expertise to this compendium of influential and delicious recipes from chefs, home cooks, and food writers. Devoted Times subscribers will find the many treasured recipes they have cooked for years—Plum Torte, David Eyre's Pancake, Pamela Sherrid's Summer Pa Amanda Hesser, co-founder and CEO of Food52 and former New York Times food columnist, brings her signature voice and expertise to this compendium of influential and delicious recipes from chefs, home cooks, and food writers. Devoted Times subscribers will find the many treasured recipes they have cooked for years—Plum Torte, David Eyre's Pancake, Pamela Sherrid's Summer Pasta—as well as favorites from the early Craig Claiborne New York Times Cookbook and a host of other classics—from 1940s Caesar salad and 1960s flourless chocolate cake to today's fava bean salad and no-knead bread. Hesser has cooked and updated every one of the 1,000-plus recipes here. Her chapter introductions showcase the history of American cooking, and her witty and fascinating headnotes share what makes each recipe special. The Essential New York Times Cookbook is for people who grew up in the kitchen with Claiborne, for curious cooks who want to serve a nineteenth-century raspberry granita to their friends, and for the new cook who needs a book that explains everything from how to roll out dough to how to slow-roast fish—a volume that will serve as a lifelong companion.

30 review for The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century

  1. 4 out of 5

    Deby

    I was complaining earlier today that I did not know how to categorize this book on Goodreads. You have to call a book "to-read", "read", or "currently-reading", and I don't just sit down and read cookbooks. Well, today, I opened the book up, intending to look for ideas for recipes to cook this weekend. And wouldn't you know it, I wound up reading just about the entire fish and seafood section. Why fish and seafood? I don't know. It's just about smack dab in the middle of the book. I think I open I was complaining earlier today that I did not know how to categorize this book on Goodreads. You have to call a book "to-read", "read", or "currently-reading", and I don't just sit down and read cookbooks. Well, today, I opened the book up, intending to look for ideas for recipes to cook this weekend. And wouldn't you know it, I wound up reading just about the entire fish and seafood section. Why fish and seafood? I don't know. It's just about smack dab in the middle of the book. I think I opened it up looking for chicken and got caught. I now have about 26 post it tabs on recipes that I'd like to try someday, from the ones I think I can accomplish fairly easily, to the ones that will take some bravery at the fish counter. Then I nearly started in on the soups. (A chapter that's nowhere near the fish chapter by the way.) Within each chapter, the recipes are arranged chronologically by year of publication in the Times. I'm finding it fascinating to see what was popular when. For example, curries were showing up in the Times in the 1880's. Who knew? Not me. (Although I probably should have guessed given that a Sherlock Holmes story features a curry. But that was in the UK. And I digress.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Francine

    I loved this book! What a massive tome of wonderful recipes covering all of the past New York Times all the way back to the 1800s. I read an article about the author and she made all of the recipes to make sure they would work in today's kitchens. I tried three from the book, one from the 1940s and two from the 1970s and they were delicious. This book should be right on your shelf next to The Joy of Cooking.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a heckuva compilation, made up of recipes featured in the New York Times from the latter 1800s to the early 2000s. Just the overviews of historical ebbs and flows of food preferences and fads alone are insightful and fascinating. I'm dying to make "German Toast", as in French Toast's cousin, submitted by a reader circa 1875. It also provides new reminders that seemingly contemporary phenomena are not in fact all that new or unique. Baked Alaska, which I assumed was a 1960s-80s era indulg This is a heckuva compilation, made up of recipes featured in the New York Times from the latter 1800s to the early 2000s. Just the overviews of historical ebbs and flows of food preferences and fads alone are insightful and fascinating. I'm dying to make "German Toast", as in French Toast's cousin, submitted by a reader circa 1875. It also provides new reminders that seemingly contemporary phenomena are not in fact all that new or unique. Baked Alaska, which I assumed was a 1960s-80s era indulgence, was invented in 1867. Americans were making curries in the 1880s (and recommending them in the New York Times). A recipe that first appeared in 1908 became popularized in the sixties, and a polenta that appeared in the 1870s submitted by "Bob the Sea Cook" resurfaces in a column in 1993. Hesser has some snarky footnotes about misguided tangents and short-lived trends that more or less flamed out ("1993: Pan-Asian cooking is attempted at home and pretty much fails") and other asides about discovering lost treasures (like German Toast). It's deeply rewarding to feel the depth of historical context this collection provides; the ability to cook from 150 year old recipes without feeling like historical reenactment is kind of extraordinary. My biggest disappointment with the book is that the editors exercised fairly actively biased selections; for instance, very few recipes from the first half of the 20th century made the cut (she calls it the dark ages), and she makes a point of mentioning that while quiches were popular in the 1970s, none appear in this book, which sounds a bit like personal snobbery against underappreciated deliciousness. However, it's not possible for anyone to be truly objective in picking the worthwhile recipes to include, and her chosen barometer of "would I make this again?" allows her to lean into her personal taste, which perhaps is how this thick volume manages to feel both authoritative and inspiring. I can google quiche recipes easily enough in exchange for that 😂.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maryfran Johnson

    I bought the Kindle version of this for a mere 2.99 on Amazon. It's an absolutely delightful, highly readable cookbook, made all the more so by the terrific background commentary author Amanda Hess adds before most of the recipes. It's a culinary trip through the ages of all the great recipes from The New York Times, many of them refined and updated by a fantastic cook.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    If you are ever caught short and need a meat tenderising hammer in a hurry and it has disappeared, have no fear the Essential New York Times Cookbook is here. This book is such a size that you could use it instead of a hammer to bash (tenderise) the meat into submission. This might be one of those cookbooks that you buy where you can justifiably not feel bad if you never ever go through it all. To many it might be the only book they need but it would be a little unfair to state that it should be If you are ever caught short and need a meat tenderising hammer in a hurry and it has disappeared, have no fear the Essential New York Times Cookbook is here. This book is such a size that you could use it instead of a hammer to bash (tenderise) the meat into submission. This might be one of those cookbooks that you buy where you can justifiably not feel bad if you never ever go through it all. To many it might be the only book they need but it would be a little unfair to state that it should be the only book you will need. However if you were to be transported to a tropical island with limitless foodstuffs where only one cookbook was allowed... A very tough decision. Where can one start? This is a compilation of over a thousand recipes compiled from everywhere and anywhere and collected from a 150 year-odd timeframe. Yet every recipe has been cooked and updated by the editor so you can be assured that it is practically feasible to try each and every one. The book's title tends to do it a bit of a disservice as it is a lot more than a cookbook. The quality of the background, accompanying information is stunning and really hits the mark. Despite being The New York Times' cookbook this is not a parochial American offering, that much is clear from the inside cover where a mass of conversion tables to those "funny, foreign metric measures" are given. Thoughtfulness just runs through this book from cover to cover. Interestingly there is not one colour photograph throughout and this isn't even thought to be a niggle! The editor's introduction is not so much an introduction but a full-blown essay in its own right, explaining the thoughts that went behind the book, its workflow, its development, portraits of the author and contributors and on and on. When it is time to finally see some recipes one notes that they are split into many chapters: Drinks, cocktails, punches and glögg; Hors d'Oeuvres, snacks and small dishes; soups; salads; vegetables; potatoes, corn and legumes; pasta, rice, grains and stuffings; sandwiches, pizza and savoury pies; fish and shellfish; poultry and game; beef, veal, lamb and pork; sauces, dressings, condiments, rubs and preserves; breakfast and brunch; breads and baking; cookies and candy; frozen desserts; cake; pies, tarts and other desserts. If that is not enough then there are a few appendices with menus, information sources, credits and a gargantuan index to keep you busy. As the recipes span a 150-plus year period it is great to see that a timeline is given within each section to show where a recipe first seemed to appear (when it has not been possibly to definitively determine its creation date). A small thing but a fascinating little thing to see the development of foods and food fashion. Each individual recipe (which fails to give an approximated prep/cook time) is prefaced by a scene-setter or background read and followed by a detailed ingredients list and comprehensive instructions about how to make the dish. At the end of each recipe is a portion guideline, some cooking notes as relevant, serving suggestions and even a little historical vignette and a recipe source/credit. This book will not be an aspirational, inspirational cookbook as some of its smaller, colourful bedfellows might be, but it sits squarely as a dependable fount of all knowledge, an instant resource, a sturdy companion in your culinary hour of need. For the Britons a sort of a Mrs Beeton but from a colonial cousin. For what you get, both in a physical and knowledge sense, this is a book worthy of serious consideration. The relative low prices makes it a steal, but do make sure you have paid for it! The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century, edited by Amanda Hesser and published by W. W. Norton Co. ISBN 9780393061031, 1056 pages. Typical price: GBP24. YYYYY. // This review appeared in YUM.fi and is reproduced here in full with permission of YUM.fi. YUM.fi celebrates the worldwide diversity of food and drink, as presented through the humble book. Whether you call it a cookery book, cook book, recipe book or something else (in the language of your choice) YUM will provide you with news and reviews of the latest books on the marketplace. //

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kym

    Oh, my stars! This is one hefty, no-photo cookbook! Amanda Hesser took a look at all the recipes published by the New York Times. Yes. All. 150 years worth. She tried a bunch, had others taste-test and included the best in this cookbook. She includes a timeline for each section. There is a brief, but fascinating history (to me, anyway) of food trends in the Times. I set out to peruse the recipes and didn't even make it out the cocktails before I knew I would be buying this book. This is a treasu Oh, my stars! This is one hefty, no-photo cookbook! Amanda Hesser took a look at all the recipes published by the New York Times. Yes. All. 150 years worth. She tried a bunch, had others taste-test and included the best in this cookbook. She includes a timeline for each section. There is a brief, but fascinating history (to me, anyway) of food trends in the Times. I set out to peruse the recipes and didn't even make it out the cocktails before I knew I would be buying this book. This is a treasure.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This was a Christmas gift to me by my husband last year. It is a compilation of recipes that have been published in the New York Times and, if you're a foodie, is a must read. Amanda Hesser's stories give a history of the food scene in New York and she is just a great storyteller. Alice Waters, Thomas Keller and Ina Garten give praises for the book - for the recipes as well as the sense of history these recipes cover. I've made only a handful of dishes from this cookbook and they've all been deli This was a Christmas gift to me by my husband last year. It is a compilation of recipes that have been published in the New York Times and, if you're a foodie, is a must read. Amanda Hesser's stories give a history of the food scene in New York and she is just a great storyteller. Alice Waters, Thomas Keller and Ina Garten give praises for the book - for the recipes as well as the sense of history these recipes cover. I've made only a handful of dishes from this cookbook and they've all been delicious.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anna Kehl

    This is worth reading just for the notes about the recipes. The author provides all kinds of interesting information about American food history, readers of the Times from previous generations, and more. I definitely wouldn't make all of these, but there are some really intriguing recipes that sound delicious and don't require specialty ingredients.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Great book that sheds light on American food history. It is a bit overwhelming, however, and is reminiscent of a dictionary. I'm not too fond of how the recipes are categorized in the beginning of each section (I'd rather have it by what order the recipes show up in the book), but I think that's me being persnickety.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Lo

    Reading and cooking my way through this book. All the stories of the recipes are intriguing-- not just a cookbook, and archive of culinary history.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    I love this book. Amanda feels like an old, quirky friend from the first page and her commentary on the recipes and contributors is a delight to read- so much so that I can actually sit down and read through this book for serious lengths of time and not come up for air. The recipes are arranged chronologically, with a timeline at the beginning of each section with lines like: 1990s "We get much more excited by risotto" and 2000s "Exhausted with risotto..." The recipes are also intriguing and dif I love this book. Amanda feels like an old, quirky friend from the first page and her commentary on the recipes and contributors is a delight to read- so much so that I can actually sit down and read through this book for serious lengths of time and not come up for air. The recipes are arranged chronologically, with a timeline at the beginning of each section with lines like: 1990s "We get much more excited by risotto" and 2000s "Exhausted with risotto..." The recipes are also intriguing and different from other NYT cookbooks. There is a wide variety to choose from and the first thing I made from it - cabbage and potato gratin with mustard bread crumbs- was fantastic and completely surprised my dinner guests who were expecting it to be bland- HA! Will return to this book again and again when needing inspiration or entertainment.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I expected this to be the “best if the best” recipes and it was all of them...1,400...TMI and not a single photograph of a recipe item in the 900+ pages. This is a great cookbook for the serious cook, I’m just not that serious.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    This is a cookbook that you actually read. It's very interesting to go through the recipes and get the back story. I love thumbing through this book. It gets me excited about cooking and I learn new things every time I sit down to look through it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jameyanne Fuller

    This was a lot of fun to read. I particularly enjoyed all the historical notes, and I have a list of recipes to try now.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    My joy of cooking

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dee Roll

    Wide variety of recipes that have been featured in the NYT

  17. 4 out of 5

    Viriam

    What a compendium! Well organized.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Viserrat

    Must have This one is a “must have” book. I am so happy I have bought it. So many variety of recipes

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    The commentary on the recipes is fantastic and super informative about both the recipe itself and its history. Hadn't even finished the book before ordering it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Love at first sight. I put off picking up a copy of this for so long because I just knew I would have to have one of my own the second my sticky fingers cracked the binding. I was right. I renewed this from the library, keeping it for a full six weeks before returning it. . . only to check it out again before anyone else did. How gratifying to see a few recipes I'd clipped years ago, still unmade and waiting for the perfect occasion. The favorite, Marian Burros' Purple Plum Torte, I distinctly r Love at first sight. I put off picking up a copy of this for so long because I just knew I would have to have one of my own the second my sticky fingers cracked the binding. I was right. I renewed this from the library, keeping it for a full six weeks before returning it. . . only to check it out again before anyone else did. How gratifying to see a few recipes I'd clipped years ago, still unmade and waiting for the perfect occasion. The favorite, Marian Burros' Purple Plum Torte, I distinctly recall reading over and over in Santa Fe in 2001, waiting for plum season so that I could bake two dozen cakes and store them in the freezer, just as in the anecdote to the recipe. Here it is: “A friend who loved the torte said that in exchange for two, she would let me store as many as I wanted in her freezer,” Burros wrote one year when she ran the recipe. “A week later, she went on vacation for two weeks and her mother stayed with her children. When she returned, my friend called and asked, ‘How many of those tortes did you leave in my freezer?’ “‘Twenty-four, but two of those were for you.’ “There was a long pause. ‘Well, I guess my mother either ate twelve of them or gave them away.’” Preparing for my trip to Santa Fe in 2010, I wistfully returned the book to the library and swore I would buy a copy there so that I could cook from the book for dear friends. But I didn't. Comfort enough knowing that Hesser's friendly voice would still be there when I might find a gently used copy of my own. Flash forward to 2014. I was lost in the stacks at a lovely little bookstore and bought myself a brand new copy. Must have been one of those "you deserve it" days. Suffice it to say, the value of the recipes far outweigh the price of the book; thus the well-chosen title. Those who have tasted the Purple Plum Torte have adored it. A boyfriend told me that eating it was a synesthetic experience, taking him back to his favorite pastry shop in Sicily. I think I may have to plant a purple plum tree in homage to (and more anticipation of) the cake. But the Purple Plum Torte is only one of many decisively delicious recipes. My latest discovery: the Salted Caramel Ice Cream recipe. (Bonus recipe: the ice cream requires 6 egg yolks; the Angel Food Cake requires 6 egg whites. Make them both and serve together. You're welcome.) I'll make this ice cream again and again, If my friends and family fall for the talented pastry chef ruse, so be it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maze Branch Oak Park Public Library

    When asked how they would rate this book using the Goodreads star system, two of the What's Cooking participants enthusiastically gave it 6 and 7 stars. We really enjoyed this cookbook...even without pictures. Hesser did a remarkable job compiling and testing and sharing these recipes. We especially enjoyed the historical culinary timelines she provided as well as menu ideas. We sampled the following recipes... - Maria Tillman Jackson Roger's Carrot Cake - Red Pepper and Feta Spread - Crispy Chickpe When asked how they would rate this book using the Goodreads star system, two of the What's Cooking participants enthusiastically gave it 6 and 7 stars. We really enjoyed this cookbook...even without pictures. Hesser did a remarkable job compiling and testing and sharing these recipes. We especially enjoyed the historical culinary timelines she provided as well as menu ideas. We sampled the following recipes... - Maria Tillman Jackson Roger's Carrot Cake - Red Pepper and Feta Spread - Crispy Chickpeas with Pork - Potato, Ham and Piquillo Pepper Croquets - Almond Cake - Marcella's Pear Cake - Old South buttermilk Biscuit - Best Spinach Dip - Caramelized Bacon - Spicy Orange Salad - Boston Baked Beans - Tomato Soup 1 - James Beard's 40 Clove of Garlic Chicken - Claret Cup Most of these recipes received positive or okay ratings. The Crispy Chickpeas was the only one that received a negative rating and the Spicy Orange Salad was the only one that received 90% "just okay" ratings. The recipes are easy to follow, and ingredients were easy to find at local supermarkets. This book is large enough to provide numerous occasions to delve into it to find additional recipes to test and play with. The only information that doesn't some to be included in this book is nutritional information.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Blog on Books

    Another huge volume on the market this season is “The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century” (Norton). In it, author, collator, food tester Amanda Hesser shares the results of six years worth of deep-diving through a century and a half of the gray lady’s recipe archives winnowing the result down to about 867 pages of the most sturdy yet diverse recipes of the ages (as well as a smattering of photos, timelines and a complete index.) Hesser is quick to point out that Another huge volume on the market this season is “The Essential New York Times Cookbook: Classic Recipes for a New Century” (Norton). In it, author, collator, food tester Amanda Hesser shares the results of six years worth of deep-diving through a century and a half of the gray lady’s recipe archives winnowing the result down to about 867 pages of the most sturdy yet diverse recipes of the ages (as well as a smattering of photos, timelines and a complete index.) Hesser is quick to point out that this is not an update to Craig Claiborne’s famed “New York Times Cookbook,” but rather a book that begins much earlier than the Claiborne era and continues forward to the age of lighter meals, a broader array of ingredients and a text that references Wikipedia, blogs and even mentions Twitter a time or two. In all, this is a compendium of the best of what the newspaper has offered p through the ages and while no one can be certain of the origination of every recipe having writers like Mark Bittman, Ruth Reichl, Molly O’Neill and the aforementioned Claiborne certainly give weight and credibilty to t

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Of course I didn't read all 932 pages but I read about 50 and am eager to spend the next several decades trying out these recipes. As the Introduction explains, Hesser and Stubbs selected the most popular and the best recipes from the 1850s to the date of publication. I love Hesser's description of the history of cooking in the US, found in the Introduction and in the chronologies at the beginning of each chapter. The recipes include an assortment of brief opinions, stories, and nuggets from his Of course I didn't read all 932 pages but I read about 50 and am eager to spend the next several decades trying out these recipes. As the Introduction explains, Hesser and Stubbs selected the most popular and the best recipes from the 1850s to the date of publication. I love Hesser's description of the history of cooking in the US, found in the Introduction and in the chronologies at the beginning of each chapter. The recipes include an assortment of brief opinions, stories, and nuggets from history. Despite all of these details that make the book so fun to read, the strength of the book comes from the guarantee behind each recipe. These are tried and tested, reader endorsed recipes. I've only sampled a few but I've flagged dozens.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eron

    This is a really fun book to read through, even if you aren't looking for a recipe. It includes tried and true recipes from the Times 150 year-old Food Archive. There is a great food history timeline in the front, as well as timelines at the beginning of each chapter with relevent historical facts. The cocktail chapter is awesome. The recipes are a mix of things I'll probably never try, things I'll try to the letter and recipes I'd be interested in adapting. It's entertaining reading as well as This is a really fun book to read through, even if you aren't looking for a recipe. It includes tried and true recipes from the Times 150 year-old Food Archive. There is a great food history timeline in the front, as well as timelines at the beginning of each chapter with relevent historical facts. The cocktail chapter is awesome. The recipes are a mix of things I'll probably never try, things I'll try to the letter and recipes I'd be interested in adapting. It's entertaining reading as well as full of lots of great recipes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    This is a cool cookbook! Amanda Hesser goes back to the 19th century, seelcting recipes that are associated with the New York Times since then. While most of the recipes are from relatively recently, it is great fun to take a look at those from long ago (e.g., Tomato Soup from 1877; Lobster Bisque from 1881; Watercress Salad from 1882; Welsh Rarebit from 1875; Omelet with Asparagus, 1879). Hesser and staff actually cooked up these (and many other) recipes to determine which were worthy of inclus This is a cool cookbook! Amanda Hesser goes back to the 19th century, seelcting recipes that are associated with the New York Times since then. While most of the recipes are from relatively recently, it is great fun to take a look at those from long ago (e.g., Tomato Soup from 1877; Lobster Bisque from 1881; Watercress Salad from 1882; Welsh Rarebit from 1875; Omelet with Asparagus, 1879). Hesser and staff actually cooked up these (and many other) recipes to determine which were worthy of inclusion in this book. In short, loads of fun!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Liz De Coster

    A combination of culinary history and recipe treasure trove from the newspaper of record. While a good portion of the recipes were not to my personal taste, I still enjoyed reading about the history of the recipe - where it originated, how it's developed over time, regional variations, etc. I don't know that I'd recommend rushing out to buy this cookbook unless you're serious about experimenting with your cooking, but if you're interested in American culinary history, I think you'd enjoy this on A combination of culinary history and recipe treasure trove from the newspaper of record. While a good portion of the recipes were not to my personal taste, I still enjoyed reading about the history of the recipe - where it originated, how it's developed over time, regional variations, etc. I don't know that I'd recommend rushing out to buy this cookbook unless you're serious about experimenting with your cooking, but if you're interested in American culinary history, I think you'd enjoy this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sue Gregoire

    I actually read my cookbooks cover to cover. And this one, while it's a monster of a book, was one of the more enjoyable. Amanda Hesser has a very distinctive and down to earth voice. I've heard many celebrity authors don't do much of the recipe development and testing for their books, but I believe she really did make most ,if not all, of these dishes. Plus, she made me laugh out loud more than once. Of course none of that would matter if the recipes themselves were no good, but there were many I actually read my cookbooks cover to cover. And this one, while it's a monster of a book, was one of the more enjoyable. Amanda Hesser has a very distinctive and down to earth voice. I've heard many celebrity authors don't do much of the recipe development and testing for their books, but I believe she really did make most ,if not all, of these dishes. Plus, she made me laugh out loud more than once. Of course none of that would matter if the recipes themselves were no good, but there were many I've flagged to try. Its a keeper for sure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    M

    The lovely Amanda Hesser, now of food52 fame, has put together a fantastic collection of recipes that create an informative cross-section of food culture for the past 150 years. Many recipes have a brief note from Amanda at the start, and her introduction alone make the book worth owning. I have an advance copy with an unnumbered index, so I've been forced to read this book cover to cover to find just what I'm looking for. Well worth it, though! The only thing this cookbook seems to be lacking i The lovely Amanda Hesser, now of food52 fame, has put together a fantastic collection of recipes that create an informative cross-section of food culture for the past 150 years. Many recipes have a brief note from Amanda at the start, and her introduction alone make the book worth owning. I have an advance copy with an unnumbered index, so I've been forced to read this book cover to cover to find just what I'm looking for. Well worth it, though! The only thing this cookbook seems to be lacking is a chili recipe - thus the removal of a star from my rating. Otherwise, excellent.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Most of the NYT recipes I try turn out pretty unremarkably, so I did not have high hopes for this book. But it's both really enjoyable to read and has produced good results in the handful of recipes I've tried while I've had it checked out, including a roasted squash soup, jalapeno corn muffins and potato, mushroom and Brie gratin. The recipes have been carefully curated and tested, so the book is theoretically dud-free.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    This book is definitely valuable for its historic value. Lots of little vignettes relating to the time the recipe was created or introduced to the public such as Waldorf Salad coming from the famed Waldorf Hotel. It is not quite as useful as a cookbook. Seems like there are more recipes for rabbit than there are for cookies, for example. Some ingredients would not be available at typical stores either. Great for foodies though.

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