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The Marvelous Museum: Orphans, Curiosities & Treasures: A Mark Dion Project

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What is the role of the museum in contemporary society? Using the Oakland Museum of California as a case study, artist Mark Dion examines how museum practices have shifted over time, what these changes mean for objects in museum collections, and what we can learn about our culture from what's included and what's abandoned. Enclosed in a clamshell case and featuring fourtee What is the role of the museum in contemporary society? Using the Oakland Museum of California as a case study, artist Mark Dion examines how museum practices have shifted over time, what these changes mean for objects in museum collections, and what we can learn about our culture from what's included and what's abandoned. Enclosed in a clamshell case and featuring fourteen specimen cards, this deluxe volume brings the reader into Dion's process and reveals how the order of images can change one's perception of objects. Contributions from celebrated writers, including Lawrence Weschler and D. Graham Burnett, articulate Dion's unique power of examination.


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What is the role of the museum in contemporary society? Using the Oakland Museum of California as a case study, artist Mark Dion examines how museum practices have shifted over time, what these changes mean for objects in museum collections, and what we can learn about our culture from what's included and what's abandoned. Enclosed in a clamshell case and featuring fourtee What is the role of the museum in contemporary society? Using the Oakland Museum of California as a case study, artist Mark Dion examines how museum practices have shifted over time, what these changes mean for objects in museum collections, and what we can learn about our culture from what's included and what's abandoned. Enclosed in a clamshell case and featuring fourteen specimen cards, this deluxe volume brings the reader into Dion's process and reveals how the order of images can change one's perception of objects. Contributions from celebrated writers, including Lawrence Weschler and D. Graham Burnett, articulate Dion's unique power of examination.

34 review for The Marvelous Museum: Orphans, Curiosities & Treasures: A Mark Dion Project

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    It's hard not to be impressed by this book. I was lucky enough to find a copy at a library, and when I saw it, I was a little shocked. The book is held by a box, made to look like plywood, and is large. It's a perfect container. The book is divided up into sections, beginning with what is still my favourite: a conversation between Mark Dion and Lawrence Weschler. That conversation is the most philosophical part of the book, as a lot of the rest focused on more tangible elements of museums, and in It's hard not to be impressed by this book. I was lucky enough to find a copy at a library, and when I saw it, I was a little shocked. The book is held by a box, made to look like plywood, and is large. It's a perfect container. The book is divided up into sections, beginning with what is still my favourite: a conversation between Mark Dion and Lawrence Weschler. That conversation is the most philosophical part of the book, as a lot of the rest focused on more tangible elements of museums, and in particular the buildings and collections that are part of specific museums in California. I'm not from California and know very little about it, so some of the book was lost on me. Nonetheless, it was interesting and the California-specific details can easily be understood in the context of the whole subject of museums, history, and colonialism. I actually wished some of the later sections were a bit more clear on the role of colonialism on early American museums. I didn't know much about expeditions like Snow's, and find it kind of horrifying to read about. In that way, this book didn't go far enough, though I also appreciate that it wants to pose a lot of information to its viewer and allow them to generate their own ideas. Overall, this is a very beautiful and interesting book. For me, it didn't go quite far enough with ideas in the second half of its written content, but it's still very worth a read. I hadn't encountered Mark Dion's work or writing prior to this, but I'm hoping I'll be able to see/read some more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    709.2 D592m 2010

  3. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aly

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jmisraje

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kolle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steven Lubar

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  15. 4 out of 5

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    four_eyes

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

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    Catherine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Megan W

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elissa

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    Sylvia

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    Richelle Wilson

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    Rose Linke

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Casey

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    Cathie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alliesaurus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephan

  31. 4 out of 5

    V

  32. 4 out of 5

    Billy Candelaria

  33. 4 out of 5

    Maria Bianchi

  34. 4 out of 5

    Angela

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