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Rumpelstiltskin: From the German of the Brothers Grimm

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"Adult and child can delight together in the richness of color, gilt and detail...captured in such art. The story is palinly and gracefully told."--The New York Times Book Review"A lush and substantial offering." -- Booklist


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"Adult and child can delight together in the richness of color, gilt and detail...captured in such art. The story is palinly and gracefully told."--The New York Times Book Review"A lush and substantial offering." -- Booklist

30 review for Rumpelstiltskin: From the German of the Brothers Grimm

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I have always loved this story as a kid. I still never completely understood it though. I mean Rumpelstiltskin does save this girls life. The thing I have never understood is that the girl is threatened 3 times by this king guy and if she can’t spin straw into gold she will die. He seems like quite the villain to me, but she ends up marrying him. That is pretty messed up. You were going to kill me, great, let’s get married, you are husband material. Then, this strange little man does a job for y I have always loved this story as a kid. I still never completely understood it though. I mean Rumpelstiltskin does save this girls life. The thing I have never understood is that the girl is threatened 3 times by this king guy and if she can’t spin straw into gold she will die. He seems like quite the villain to me, but she ends up marrying him. That is pretty messed up. You were going to kill me, great, let’s get married, you are husband material. Then, this strange little man does a job for you, you agree on payment and then he ends up the bad guy. She didn’t have to offer up her child, but she did. She made the agreement. I think he wanted her to overhear his name. He seems to know what’s going on around that castle. He always shows up just when he’s needed. I think he was saying his name in the woods so the girl wouldn’t have to give up the child. He didn’t have to give her 3 nights to guess his name. It’s all a ruse. Rumpelstiltskin is the hero of this messed up story. The artwork is like Rapunzel, it’s a Italian Renaissance style like that other book. It’s very beautiful. Paul did say that he used the 2nd edition of the Grimm’s Fairy tales to tell this story. I want to see this get a Disney movie, but Rumpelstiltskin is the hero of the story and he is some sort of do gooder. Maybe I need to write this thing. It would take me 20 years to do that. Well, someone else can. Rumpelstiltskin looks like a bug-eyed creepy thing here. He is a strange little man. The niece likes this story too, but she picked up on the girl marrying the king after he threatened her life. She thought that was stupid. Spinning straw to gold is quite enchanting and she liked the story as well. She gave it 4 stars. The nephew thought Rumpelstiltskin was very cool. He thought he was a type of monster. He thought spinning straw into gold was pretty good. He liked this story too and he gave this 4 stars. 4 stars all around.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    This review is going to be a bit different in so far that I am mostly posting general musings about both this story, but more particularly, the Rumpestilzchen type tales in folklore and tradition. RUMPELSTILZCHEN TALES Most of the Rumpelstilzchen type fairy and folktales are basically examples of resourceful women outsmarting a for all intents and purposes demonic presence, an entity who might originally seem helpful, but who is, in fact, only helpful because he/she/it wants to obtain the girls' s This review is going to be a bit different in so far that I am mostly posting general musings about both this story, but more particularly, the Rumpestilzchen type tales in folklore and tradition. RUMPELSTILZCHEN TALES Most of the Rumpelstilzchen type fairy and folktales are basically examples of resourceful women outsmarting a for all intents and purposes demonic presence, an entity who might originally seem helpful, but who is, in fact, only helpful because he/she/it wants to obtain the girls' souls, or their unborn children, or actually, both (they want everything, body and soul). Thus, I have always rejoiced that the evil little imps of these tales (who are also usually portrayed as so cocksure of themselves) are generally roundly and soundly outsmarted and defeated by the female protagonists, and have not as a rule ever felt that the girls presented owe their so-called "helpers" much if any gratitude at all (as right from the beginning, it is usually abundantly clear that the seemingly helpful gnomes are after the girls' possessions, and all of their possessions). However, it must also be stated that in the majority of these tales, the female protagonists are put into problematic and dangerous situations not due to their OWN actions, their own words, but due to the actions and words of those around them (their fathers, mothers, stepmothers, even the greedy kings or merchants who strive to obtain more and more riches, more and more gold, and would kill if thwarted in their endeavours, in many ways, they are also unnatural and actually even on par with the imps and demons who pretend to help and sustain the girls). In the Rumpelstilzchen story of the Brothers Grimm, it is the father of the girl (the miller) who originally brags to the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold and thus endangers her life (if she cannot do this task, she will be killed, she will be executed). Later, the king gets more and more greedy, keeping the unfortunate girl incarcerated, spinning threads into gold, thus forcing her to finally promise the imp her unborn child (already having given away both her necklace and then her ring). And it is thus the miller's vanity and desire to impress the monarch, and later the king's greedy lust for more and more riches that have in every way created the poor girl's dilemma, and really, no blame should therefore fall on the girl; she simply does what she needs to survive, to protect her unborn child and herself. In other, similar European tales (from Austria, Switzerland, Italy, England etc.), an evil stepmother or a jealous, angry mother make outrageous claims that their daughters or stepdaughters can spin gold, to get rid of them, to punish them for supposed laziness, to put them in a position where their inability to be able to do what the mother or stepmother have claimed, will likely cause the daughters' or stepdaughters' destruction and potential demise. However, while thus in almost ALL of these stories, there are other less obviously guilty antagonists than the scheming seemingly helpful (but in reality harmful) goblins, namely the greedy kings, merchants, barons etc., whose increasing demand for gold and riches at all costs precipitate the action and leave the female protagonists in dire straits and vulnerable to the machinations of the "helpful" imps and demons, there are usually NO actual consequences for these "players" (and even for the parents, the stepparents, the individuals who first bragged about the girls' supposed gold spinning talents, there are usually no nasty or negative repercussions either). And in NONE of the Rumpelstilzchen type tales I have read to date (except for the exquisite West Indian variant The Girl Who Spun Gold) are there ever apologies (or even much acknowledgement of responsibility) by the father/mother/stepmother who originally tells the lie (or brags about the nonexistent spinning talents of the daughter or stepdaughter), or by the greedy merchants, kings and the like who push and continue to push the female protagonists to produce more and more golden thread, giving the latter no choice but to accept supernatural aid (in the Grimms' version of the tale, while the fact that the king keeps on demading more gold is at least acknowledged, there is nonetheless no real censure or blame cast at him). SPINNING AND WOMEN'S WORK IN FOLK AND FAIRY TALES I have recently started to reflect upon the depiction of the act and the craft of spinning thread in folk and fairy tales. In many of these stories, the act of spinning is not depicted as something altogether positive, and it often goes hand in hand with potential danger for the spinners (these almost always being women). More often than not, spinning is used and portrayed as a method of subjugation, even abuse, and is generally described as hard work, or at least as tedious and repetitive. I believe that the often negative depiction of spinning in fairy and folk tales most likely has to do with the nature of that very type of work itself. Spinning was (and maybe even still is) generally considered to be not only a woman's domain, but also a type of handicraft that would keep a woman not only tied to the house, but also often tied or confined to one particular room. I think it is therefore no coincidence that in so many of the Rumpelstilzchen type fairy tales, and other tales involving spinning, the women are not only told to spin a certain amount of thread into gold etc. in a certain amount of time, but that they are often kept in a locked or guarded room in a castle or house until they have spun their threads (more often than not on pain of death, should they not be able to complete their given tasks). But there has always been something magical (powerful and matriarchal) with regard to the very ability to spin (and the act of spinning) as well. That magical quality is probably not only due to the fact that the Greek Fates (or the Germanic Norns) were seen to "spin" destinies (of both mortals and gods), but it likely also demonstrates the importance of the act of spinning itself. When humans (women mostly) learned how to spin thread, mankind moved from wearing animal skins to being able to fashion clothing, combine different types of wool, make bedding (the ability to spin thread was thus a supremely and important advance, as it increased protection against an often unforgiving environment, it was, in effect, a powerful tool, even a potential protective talisman). The power and potential magic of spinning notwithstanding, while the Fates and the Germanic Nornes were indeed mighty and regarded with awe and honour, they were also (and as female entities) often regarded and approached with fear and suspicion. And thus, in many if not the majority of fairy tales, spinning, while it can seem magical, even powerful (spinning straw into gold, for example), has actually rather morphed into something generally negative and threatening, as well as a method to subjugate women and keep them tied to the house, to their work, to often even one particular (generally small and confining) room (and remember how in The Sleeping Beauty, the prick of a spinning needle causes Aurora and with her, the entire kingdom, to fall into an enchanted sleep, and that spindle of destiny, so to speak, is located in a small and unfortunately forgotten sewing room, forgotten until Aurora discovers it, that is). ZELINSKY'S VERSION OF THE TALE Paul O. Zelinsky's retelling is one of the best and most authentic seeming English language adaptations of the Rumplestilzchen folktale type I have read (although I do wish he had stayed with the Grimm's ending of Rumpelstilzchen tearing himself in half and disappearing). While the story (both the Grimm's original and Zelnisky's retelling) has never been a personal favourite, the tale type itself is not only interesting, but open to different interpretations and discussions (and Zelinsky's illustrations are simply glorious, rich, nuanced and lush, with Rumpelstilzchen as an entity appearing as somewhat creepy, but also not too frightening and uncanny, which might also be perhaps why the miller's daughter originally accepts his advice and aid). An added bonus for me is the informative author's note on the genesis of the tale (and while I indeed would have appreciated a list of sources and suggestions for further reading, this is just my academic self always wishing for the moon). Highly recommended, and not just for children either!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Ali

    „Round about, round about, Lo and behold! Reel away, reel away, Straw into gold!‟ „“Merrily the feast I‟ll make. Today I‟ll brew, tomorrow bake; Merrily I‟ll dance and sing, For next day will a stranger bring. Little does my lady dream Rumpelstiltskin is my name!”„

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Escada (planningwithlove)

    While this story always creeped me out.. to this day.. it still creeps me out. A little man hears a millers daughters plea for help. The miller offering up his daughter to the king for money. (Historically accurate for sure.) But the moral of this story... questionable. I do love the illustrations in this edition.

  5. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Wonderful illustrations make this story a real treat to read, though it's hard to not feel mad at the fact that this girl was thrust into a predicament because her father was such a dumbass.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zaz

    First, a very important thing! *throws the king by the window* Ok, now it's time for the review. I never heard about Rumpel-whatever before watching the first season of the TV show Once Upon A Time. There, his personality was depicted as not very likable (yes, I'm gentle), but it left me curious about him. This picture book was an interesting adaptation, I particularly enjoyed the art that looked like old paints (Renaissance?), giving a good atmosphere, and it was perfect for things like gold. T First, a very important thing! *throws the king by the window* Ok, now it's time for the review. I never heard about Rumpel-whatever before watching the first season of the TV show Once Upon A Time. There, his personality was depicted as not very likable (yes, I'm gentle), but it left me curious about him. This picture book was an interesting adaptation, I particularly enjoyed the art that looked like old paints (Renaissance?), giving a good atmosphere, and it was perfect for things like gold. The story was well paced and satisfying regarding the outcome and the heroine, but wow the king was an evil and greedy creature, I think I preferred Rumple.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marquise

    I'm no fan of the Rumpelstiltskin tale, and probably never will, but since it's Zelinsky I couldn't resist picking the book up. The art in this edition has a certain likeness to Renaissance paintings, which I'm sure is intentional.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    This version of “Rumpelstiltskin” is a new version of the classic Brothers Grimm tale that is rewritten by Paul O. Zelinsky and has won the prestigious Caldecott Honor award. Everyone who knows the story of “Rumpelstiltskin” knows that this book is about how a small man helps a miller’s daughter with her predicament, but the small man wants a heavy price for his services. “Rumpelstiltskin” may be a bit too scary for younger children, but older children will definitely enjoy this version of the c This version of “Rumpelstiltskin” is a new version of the classic Brothers Grimm tale that is rewritten by Paul O. Zelinsky and has won the prestigious Caldecott Honor award. Everyone who knows the story of “Rumpelstiltskin” knows that this book is about how a small man helps a miller’s daughter with her predicament, but the small man wants a heavy price for his services. “Rumpelstiltskin” may be a bit too scary for younger children, but older children will definitely enjoy this version of the classic Brothers Grimm tale. Paul O. Zelinsky’s writing and illustrations contribute greatly to the story’s tension as the miller’s daughter tries to save herself from being put to death by the king and then from allowing the little man to take her child. Paul O. Zelinsky makes the story extremely intense and dramatic as he puts death and child kidnapping as the main themes of the story and he brilliant makes his writing dramatic during the scenes of the miller’s daughter being threatened with death and during the threat that the little man poses to her when he tries to take her baby. Paul O. Zelinsky’s illustrations are extremely vivid and beautiful as they capture the beauty of the Renaissance period such as illustrating the miller’s daughter in an old fashioned red dress that captures her beauty. Also, Paul O. Zelinsky has done a magnificent job at making the characters facial expressions extremely realistic, especially during the scenes where the miller’s daughter has a shocked look on her face when Rumpelstiltskin proposed to her that she should give up her child to save her life. “Rumpelstiltskin” is a great classic story from the Brothers Grimm and will greatly help parents and children discuss about the importance of avoiding strangers and to be polite around other people. I would recommend this book to children ages six and up due to themes of child kidnapping and death threats made by the king. From my Epinions Review: http://www0.epinions.com/review/Rumpe...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dina

    This is a beyond gorgeous retelling of the classic Rumpelstiltskin. I really enjoyed Zelinsky’s Rapunzel so I was looking looking forward to this book, and I was not disappointed. I was practically getting lost in the detailed illustrations and the storyline that flowed beautifully with the pictures. An excellent read that I would highly recommend to anyone!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Set

    I have this book in my bookshelf because it is one of my favorite illustrated book with Paul O. Zelinksy medieval style to a fairy tale classic. I highly recommend this book if you are a fan of beautiful fairy tale artwork.

  11. 4 out of 5

    ℛ a ℂ ℎ ℯ ℓ ♥️

    Rumpelstiltskin is one of those fairy tales that I loved reading as a child. This was one of my favorite books not only because of the story but the lovely traditional artwork done in oil painting by the author. In the back of the book there is a two page commentary explaining the history of the fairy tale. Not many people know this but there are a few versions to the story. This version is a combination of different versions. The story begins with a miller who meets the king on the road and tell Rumpelstiltskin is one of those fairy tales that I loved reading as a child. This was one of my favorite books not only because of the story but the lovely traditional artwork done in oil painting by the author. In the back of the book there is a two page commentary explaining the history of the fairy tale. Not many people know this but there are a few versions to the story. This version is a combination of different versions. The story begins with a miller who meets the king on the road and tells the king his daughter can turn ordinary wheat into gold. The king is greedy and loves gold so he takes the daughter and forces her to make gold all night or else he will kill her. Since the daughter has no idea how to make anything into gold she falls into a despair only to be met by a small peculiar man, who tells her he can fulfill her task for something in return. And thus the story takes off. I am not going to go into more detail about the plot but rather tell you what I like about this little book. What I love is the artwork and the classic style in the illustrations. It is very reminiscent of paintings of the masters and has a romantic appearance. The story is simplistic and not everything is explained but that is customary to most fairy tales in picture books, so I can shrug off some of the plot holes I encountered. There is more then one moral in this story. There are actually many. Like the King’s desire for greed, the father lying to the king about his daughters abilities, the daughter making promises to give whatever Rumpelstiltskin wants for him to make the gold for her, Rumpelstiltskin’s arrogance leading to his loss of what he wants from the daughter. All the characters have something to learn in the story (regardless if they actually learn the lesson given to them or not). Any one of these can be a great conversation to have with a child. Also this book is just fun to read and look at the pictures. I give this book a 5 star rating for nostalgia’s sake and because I love the story and art! All around, this is a wonderful read!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    When a miller convinces the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold, the king seizes the opportunity and captures her. Every evening a little man saves her by magically spinning the gold and getting jewelry in return, and by morning the king is satisfied and let her live. The third night she has nothing left to give, and he wants her unborn child in return for helping her. In her miserable state, she accepts, and when the time comes, she obviously doesn't want to give away her child. He When a miller convinces the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold, the king seizes the opportunity and captures her. Every evening a little man saves her by magically spinning the gold and getting jewelry in return, and by morning the king is satisfied and let her live. The third night she has nothing left to give, and he wants her unborn child in return for helping her. In her miserable state, she accepts, and when the time comes, she obviously doesn't want to give away her child. He gives her another chance. If she can find out his name by the next time he visits, she can keep her child. I think there's an interesting theme in this story. A woman, back then, had no power, no right and no influence over her own life. Her father treated her as an object, the king as an investment and Rumpelstiltskin as someone he could benefit from. But when it comes to Rumpelstiltskin, I don't think of him as a truly bad person. He actually gave the woman a second chance to keep her baby, though he could have just taken it - he was a magical person that were able to sneak in and out of the castle unseen, not to mention spinning straw into gold. The interesting thing here is why he would want the baby? Was it to save the oppressed people from another cruel king and to bring the baby up himself and make it a better person? Or was it to cause anarchy? Or was it revenge? I think the story is somewhat thin, and too short. I would have liked more details and more characteristics. Anyway, it's an unusual read and I will remember it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Zelinsky's retelling of Rumpelstiltskin is well written. The story is paced and phrased in a way that pulls you through the pages even if you know the basic plot of the story. The illustrations are amazing and remind my of Renaissance paintings. They are technically beautiful and filled with amazing detail. I would use Zelinsky's version to teach the story since it is clear and well told. I would also use his illustrations to showcase artistic skills and for art criticism lessons. In this versio Zelinsky's retelling of Rumpelstiltskin is well written. The story is paced and phrased in a way that pulls you through the pages even if you know the basic plot of the story. The illustrations are amazing and remind my of Renaissance paintings. They are technically beautiful and filled with amazing detail. I would use Zelinsky's version to teach the story since it is clear and well told. I would also use his illustrations to showcase artistic skills and for art criticism lessons. In this version, a father claims his daughter can spin straw into gold. He leaves her with the king who will kill her is she cannot spin an entire room of straw into gold over night. Rumpelstiltskin offers to help the first night for a necklace and the next for a ring. On the third night he wants her first born for the task. She agrees and he shows up to claim her child. Her servant follows him into the woods to discover his name. Along with the book I found a website http://www.rumpelstiltzkin.com/ This site had a very updated version of the story. I liked the use of slang and the kind of rude banter that occurred. I didn't see any pictures though, which was disappointing. I think this would be a good example for showing students how they can modernize a traditional story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Friend of Pixie (F.O.P.)

    The Renaissance-style oil paintings in this book were amazing; they really made the story. Brilliant colors, interesting perspectives, expressive faces, and evocative historic details of architecture and clothes. The text is true to the Grimm version but kind of boring, so the paintings were crucial to give the story sparkle. Logan, who is almost 7, has asked me many questions since about the nature of Rumplestiltskin: Was he evil? Was he a witch (due to flying on a wooden spoon)? Why did he wan The Renaissance-style oil paintings in this book were amazing; they really made the story. Brilliant colors, interesting perspectives, expressive faces, and evocative historic details of architecture and clothes. The text is true to the Grimm version but kind of boring, so the paintings were crucial to give the story sparkle. Logan, who is almost 7, has asked me many questions since about the nature of Rumplestiltskin: Was he evil? Was he a witch (due to flying on a wooden spoon)? Why did he want a baby? I explained that he was more like fairies or leprechauns; not exactly evil, but out for his own gain and mischief and not too concerned about humans. Interesting that L had no questions about the king, who was only interested in the miller's daughter for her ability to create gold and willing to threaten her with death and then 3 days later, to want to marry her. I guess the idea that kings are greedy bastards isn't so alien to him, considering how many fairy and folk tales we've read, which often illustrate how power and greed go hand in hand.

  15. 4 out of 5

    One Code 431

    This folk story is new to me and I have never heard of it until now although I have watched the TV show once upon a time and I knew his story and it truly did fascinated me alot .... Okay the book was great interesting story great artwork everything perfect but the child's face was little creepy I have to say but in everything I loved it

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    I read this story as a child, and I really loved it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    Love the illustrations!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    Pretty nice pictures, but how can he not have a long beard!?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Bailin

    Reading Log Title: Rumpelstiltskin Author: Paul O. Zelinsky (Originally told by the Grimm Brothers) Genre: European Folktale Theme(s): Greed, Mother’s Love Opening line/sentence (type directly from text): “Once there was a poor miller with a beautiful daughter.” Brief Book Summary (2-3 sentences in your own words): This book is a folktale about a girl who is sent to spin straw into gold for the king. She cannot do so, but he threatens her with death if she does not complete this task so she makes a d Reading Log Title: Rumpelstiltskin Author: Paul O. Zelinsky (Originally told by the Grimm Brothers) Genre: European Folktale Theme(s): Greed, Mother’s Love Opening line/sentence (type directly from text): “Once there was a poor miller with a beautiful daughter.” Brief Book Summary (2-3 sentences in your own words): This book is a folktale about a girl who is sent to spin straw into gold for the king. She cannot do so, but he threatens her with death if she does not complete this task so she makes a deal with a small man named Rumpelstiltskin. He will spin the straw for her each time the king asks, but she needs to give up something to him in return, like her necklace. Professional Recommendation/Review #1 (cut & paste, details below): https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... “After comparing several of the original Grimm variants, Zelinsky has selected and retold to make his own version. Graceful and lucid, it differs from the familiar in having the imp overheard crowing about his name by a servant rather than by the king, and by having him ride about and ultimately depart forever on a cooking spoon, a non-violent conclusion. Zelinaky's illustrations are opulently painted, full of classical architectural detail, fantastic distant landscapes, and that early use of perspective which gives a raked stage effect. Rumpelstiltskin is a bug-eyed, spindle-legged Machiavelli of an imp, dressed as a courtier. The miller's daughter/queen has the face of a madonna, although her expressions are contemporary enough to interest modern children in her plight. The king (not a savory character, since he was prepared to murder his wife if she failed to spin straw into gold) stays in the background. A distinguished edition of one of Grimm's favorite tales.” Professional Recommendation/Review #2 (cut & paste, details below): Debra Briatico (Children's Literature) “In this enchanting tale, a king asks the daughter of a poor miller to spin straw into gold. Not knowing how to do this impossible task, the saddened girl loses hope until she receives a visit from a strange little man. This tiny imp decides to spin all of the king's straw into gold, but only under one condition--he gets the girl's first-born child when she marries the king and becomes queen. Agreeing to this proposition, the girl soon becomes queen and has a child one year later. When the little man shows up to collect the child, he offers another proposal to the queen. In this new agreement, he asks her to guess his name before the end of three days. Distraught over this predicament, the queen seeks the help of a faithful servant and together they outsmart the crafty Rumpelstiltskin. Zelinsky's exquisitely detailed illustrations perfectly capture the splendid beauty of the late medieval period, as well as the unique qualities of each character. 1986, Dutton, $15.99 and $5.99. Ages 5 to 8. “ (PUBLISHER: Dutton $15.99 and $5.99., PUBLISHED: 1986) Response to Two Professional Reviews: I do agree that Zelinsky’s illustrations are beautiful and make this book really appealing to the reader. The illustrations do evoke renaissance art that we saw in the Palmer Museum with Peggy. I personally found many of the characters to be quite dull, and I prefer modernized folktales with messages more relevant to readers today. Evaluation of Literary Elements: I think this book has some great dialogue that would be fun to read aloud to a child. The plot is very suspenseful because of the looming threat of death, and this keeps the reader interested. I think some modernization of the story would make it more interesting to readers. Consideration of Instructional Application: I would keep this in my classroom library, and maybe highlight this by placing it on top of a bookshelf during a folktale unit, but I am not really sure I would read this aloud. There are so many wonderful Brothers’ Grimm texts, and I am not sure this particular one stands out enough to incorporate into a lesson. I think it would be best for students to discover this themselves.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Rumpelstiltskin is the story of an old miller who tells the King that his daughter has the gift of spinning straw into gold. As the King hears such a marvelous art, he takes the miller’s daughter into his palace and locks her in a room to spin all the straw into gold. The poor miller’s daughter has not idea how the straw could be possibly be spun into gold, she feels so sad and starts crying. Suddenly, a small man comes to the rescue but he asks something in return. The first time she gives him Rumpelstiltskin is the story of an old miller who tells the King that his daughter has the gift of spinning straw into gold. As the King hears such a marvelous art, he takes the miller’s daughter into his palace and locks her in a room to spin all the straw into gold. The poor miller’s daughter has not idea how the straw could be possibly be spun into gold, she feels so sad and starts crying. Suddenly, a small man comes to the rescue but he asks something in return. The first time she gives him her necklace, then her ring but the third time she doesn’t have anything else. The King has promised to marry her if she turns the third room into gold; the little man accepts to help her for the last time if she gives him her first child when she becomes Queen. The miller’s daughter marries the King and after a year she has a beautiful baby. The Queen has forgotten about the little man, until he reappears to take the Queen’s child. The Queen starts begging and crying that the little man takes pity on her. He gives her three days to guess his name, if the Queen does not guess the little man will take the child. After three days of saying all the names she knew, the Queen’s despair grows bigger and send one of her helpers to search for more name. When the helper was walking through the woods, the helper hears the little man sing and saying his name…Rumpelstiltskin! At the end the Queen tells the little man his name he disappears and the Queen keeps her baby. This particular version by Paul O. Zelinsky of 1986 has full-page illustrations with nicely detailed pictures and realistic characters. These oil paintings show medieval times and they express with ease feelings and gestures that complement the text. All versions I have read are very similar throughout the story and few discrepancies could be found between them. In this story the messenger that Queen sends to the woods is a lady which is her most faithful servant, the Queen has a baby boy, Rumpelstiltskin song says: "I brew my beer, I bake my loaves, and soon the queen’s own son I’ll claim. O lucky me! For no one knows that Rumpelstiltskin is my name!" Also, Rumpelstiltskin complains about the Devil telling his name to Queen and at the end, Rumpelstiltskin jumps on his cooking spoon and flies out the window This ending was the kindest and more child friendly of all. For a traditional literature book for children some of the language is strong and some of the scenes are unkind. For example, the miller gives his daughter away by lying, the King locks the miller’s daughter and threatens her to kill her, the greediness of the King is obsessive and no one ask the miller’s daughter if she actually wanted to marry the King! It is a entertaining story but one without a good message in my opinion.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Casey Strauss

    Rumpelstiltskin is a picture book written and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky. It is a retelling of the Grimm fairy tale. The end notes at the back of the book explain that several different versions were used to compile this particular retelling. This picture book was the recipient of the 1987 Caldecott Honor, as well as several other awards. In this fairy tale, a foolish miller promises the king that his daughter is able to take straw and spin it into gold, in hopes of impressing him. The gree Rumpelstiltskin is a picture book written and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky. It is a retelling of the Grimm fairy tale. The end notes at the back of the book explain that several different versions were used to compile this particular retelling. This picture book was the recipient of the 1987 Caldecott Honor, as well as several other awards. In this fairy tale, a foolish miller promises the king that his daughter is able to take straw and spin it into gold, in hopes of impressing him. The greedy king then orders for the miller’s daughter to be brought to his castle to spin him gold, with the punishment of death if she is unable to do so. Hopeless, the miller’s daughter begins to cry in the room where she has been placed, surrounded by straw and a spinning wheel. Suddenly, a small man appears with a deal. If she gives him something of value, he will, in turn, spin the straw into gold for her. The miller’s daughter complies by giving him her necklace, and the small man holds up his end of the deal and spins a room full of gold. The story continues with the man visiting the miller’s daughter two more times, each time asking for something of value in return. On the third evening, she doesn’t have anything left to give him, and in desperation, promises him her first born. Years later, the miller’s daughter has married the king and born him a son. The small man who has helped her spin the gold returns, asking for her son. As the queen breaks down, the man tells her that if she can guess his name, her child will be spared. The queen eventually finds that his name is Rumplestiltskin, and he disappears in a fit of rage. The star of this picture book would be the pictures that accompany the text. The images are vivid and fill the pages; many of the characters faces show emotion and detail. In the back of the book is a note regarding the story and its adaptation by Zelinsky, which is helpful to read because it gives historical information on the story as well. This book is suitable for younger students, probably in grades first through third. If a teacher were doing a fairy tale unit, this would be an appropriate text to use because the pictures are so engaging. I think it would be also useful to compare this to other picture books that tell the same story and compare and contrast the differences. The pictures are so strong that they could be shown alone, while students predict or infer the story as the teacher shares.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Rumpelstiltskin was retold and illustrated by Paul Zelinsky. I found it through my public library’s website in the fairytale section. Paul Zelinsky has really captured the story beautifully in his illustrations. Zelinsky used oil paints instead of water colors in a Renaissance style, which helped bring out the medieval time period of this story and gives it more details. Not only are the pictures detailed and beautiful, but the character’s faces are very expressive. In this retelling, a poor mil Rumpelstiltskin was retold and illustrated by Paul Zelinsky. I found it through my public library’s website in the fairytale section. Paul Zelinsky has really captured the story beautifully in his illustrations. Zelinsky used oil paints instead of water colors in a Renaissance style, which helped bring out the medieval time period of this story and gives it more details. Not only are the pictures detailed and beautiful, but the character’s faces are very expressive. In this retelling, a poor miller wants to impress the king and therefore, tells him that his beautiful daughter can spin straw into gold, which is a fib. The king is so intrigued that he allows the girl to come back to his palace for the night to do so. However, if she cannot spin straw into gold, she will die. That night, a little man, Rumpelstiltskin, appears in the girl’s room. He offers to help her in exchange for something of hers. She agrees and the straw is spun into gold. The king becomes greedy and wants more. This goes on for three nights and on the last night the girl has nothing left so Rumpelstiltskin asks for her first born child. She agrees. The girl and the king later marry and have a son. Rumpelstiltskin appears for the child as she has promised. However, she does not want to give up her child. He gives her three nights to guess his name and if she gets it right, she can keep her son. On the last night, the queen sends out the servant to find his name and shocked when the queen knows his name, Rumpelstiltskin disappears forever. I would use this book in primary through intermediate elementary. I think the oil painted illustrations are great and easy for children to follow along to the story, and they also give enough detail for upper elementary to talk about visualizing and characterization through the expressions on the character’s faces. Another use in the classroom is to compare and contrast this book with other Rumpelstiltskin books. Not only the story, but the pictures as well to show students how the pictures help make a story sometimes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    Using the Grimm brothers tale of Rumpelstilstiltskin, the author and illustrator makes the story come to life. The illustrations are stunningly beautiful and I was compelled to spend time with each image to see the wonderful nuances. When the poor miller comes upon the king, wanting to impress, he tells the king of his lovely daughter who can miraculously spin straw to gold. Ordering the miller to deliver his talented daughter to the castle, he obeys. As the daughter looks at the piles upon pile Using the Grimm brothers tale of Rumpelstilstiltskin, the author and illustrator makes the story come to life. The illustrations are stunningly beautiful and I was compelled to spend time with each image to see the wonderful nuances. When the poor miller comes upon the king, wanting to impress, he tells the king of his lovely daughter who can miraculously spin straw to gold. Ordering the miller to deliver his talented daughter to the castle, he obeys. As the daughter looks at the piles upon piles of straw, she is distraught, wondering how she can accomplish something beyond her abilities. Alas, a nasty looking little fellow appears and bargains for her necklace in return of his spinning the straw to gold. Greedy, when the king sees the spun gold, he now demands more. Again, the miller's daughter is distraught. As the little beady eyed fellow appears again, she barters her ring away in the hope that he can spin the mountains of straw to gold. Once again, the king demands more and more. With nothing to barter, the troll like man asks for her first born son. Believing that it will never be necessary to produce a male child in her foreseeable future, she readily agrees. The king marries the miller's daughter and she has a male child. Distraught that the child will be taken, the troll tells her that if she can discover his name, the barter will not need to occur. She sends a maid into the woods whereupon the maid spies an open fire and a dancing ugly fellow jumping in the air with a poem using his name as Rumpelstiltskin. When the queen tells him his name, in anger he jumps around with his cooking spoon and flies out the windown.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    As a child, this was one of my favorite fairy tales. I've thought about collecting images of Rumpelstiltskin just to show the wide variety of forms this little man takes in peoples' minds. The art in this book is beautiful, but Rumpelstiltskin doesn't match my image of the little guy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Santiago

    Rumpelstiltskin is a predictable picture book with a predictable story structure. A poor miller lies and tells the king that his teenage daughter can spin straw into gold. The king sends for his daughter, who is left to fret over a roomful of straw to be spun on three separate occasions. Each time, Rumpelstiltskin appears to help the girl in exchange for something valuable. First, he asks for her necklace, then her ring, and- finally- her firstborn child. While this strategy initially pans out f Rumpelstiltskin is a predictable picture book with a predictable story structure. A poor miller lies and tells the king that his teenage daughter can spin straw into gold. The king sends for his daughter, who is left to fret over a roomful of straw to be spun on three separate occasions. Each time, Rumpelstiltskin appears to help the girl in exchange for something valuable. First, he asks for her necklace, then her ring, and- finally- her firstborn child. While this strategy initially pans out for the young girl, who becomes queen, it eventually turns into an awful predicament. Rumpelstiltskin keeps his word and comes to claim the queen’s firstborn unless she figures out his name. A servant of the court spies on Rumpelstiltskin in the woods, learns of his name, and reports back to the queen. With the needed information, the queen is able to prevent Rumpelstiltskin from taking her baby. Paul O. Zelinsky’s retelling of the original Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale is a 1987 Caldecott Honor book. The reliable reappearance of Rumpelstiltskin will encourage emergent readers to take risks. It is the artistic media, however, that will draw in all readers. Zelinsky’s painted the rich illustrations with a Renaissance style by using oil paints over watercolor underpaintings. The style pairs perfectly with the medieval setting, and Zelinsky’s attention to detail and human emotion magnifies the intensity of the media. The award winning picture book can be incorporated into kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms. Emergent readers will enjoy the repetitive story structure and illustrations while fluent readers may engage in comparing and contrasting the fairy tale to other versions. The retelling inspires writing instruction, modeling how many writers are inspired by other writers’ work.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This traditional version of Rumpelstiltskin has detailed illustrations that help you walk through the fantasy world where straw can be spun into gold by a little magical man. A miller, wanting to impress a king, tells him that his daughter can spin straw into gold. Being greedy, the king takes the miller's daughter and locks her into a room with straw. If she doesn't spin the straw into gold, he will kill her. Rumpelstiltskin finds the miller's daughter and helps her the first night for her neck This traditional version of Rumpelstiltskin has detailed illustrations that help you walk through the fantasy world where straw can be spun into gold by a little magical man. A miller, wanting to impress a king, tells him that his daughter can spin straw into gold. Being greedy, the king takes the miller's daughter and locks her into a room with straw. If she doesn't spin the straw into gold, he will kill her. Rumpelstiltskin finds the miller's daughter and helps her the first night for her necklace, the second night for ring, and the third night with the promise that he would get the woman's first born child. The king, please with how the girl spun all of the straw into gold, married her. When their first child was born, Rumpelstiltskin returned to claim it. The woman, not wanting to give up her baby, made a deal with him that she would be able to guess his name in three days. If she could, she would be able to keep her baby, if she couldn't, then the baby would belong to Rumpelstiltskin. When the daughter guesses his name, the enraged Rumpelstiltskin jumps on his cooking spoon and flies out of the window, never to be seen again. The ending of each story is different, but I like how this is a non-violent version of the story. These elegant, detailed pictures really help with the visualization of the plot, and though the characters are not very developed, I believe that Rumpelstiltskin could be used as a character of focus in any lesson using this text. This book could be used in any elementary grade, depending on how it would be used. If comparing/contrasting versions of the story, this would be a great text to use in the upper grades (5 and 6). If exploring plot and character, it would fit nicely into a 2nd or 3rd grade classroom.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Rumpelstiltskin, written and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky received a Caldecott honor award in 1987 for this version. I found it displayed in my school’s library as part of a fairy tale display section. Rumpelstiltskin is one of Grimms’ fairy tales. Zelinsky has retold this story in a fresh way that merges text with beautiful illustrations that remind me of oil paintings and capture the late medieval setting. In this version of the fairy tale, a father claims his daughter can spin straw into g Rumpelstiltskin, written and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky received a Caldecott honor award in 1987 for this version. I found it displayed in my school’s library as part of a fairy tale display section. Rumpelstiltskin is one of Grimms’ fairy tales. Zelinsky has retold this story in a fresh way that merges text with beautiful illustrations that remind me of oil paintings and capture the late medieval setting. In this version of the fairy tale, a father claims his daughter can spin straw into gold. He runs into the king who is greedy and selfish and wants to bring the daughter back to his castle so she can spin gold for him. She of course does not know how to do this. The king has threatened her with death if she cannot spin a whole room of straw into gold by the next morning. Rumpelstiltskin finds her in the room and offers to help if she gives him something. She gives him her necklace and he does indeed finish the task. This goes on for three nights. With nothing left to give, Rumpelstiltskin asks for her first born child. The king weds the daughter and they have a son. Rumpelstiltskin comes to collect his debt. Unwilling to do this, Rumpelstiltskin offers the queen this option, if she can guess his name, she does not have to give up her child. The queen sends out her servant to find out the name. This story is well told and the artistic drawings make it easy to follow and understand making it a good choice for kindergarten and first graders. Along with this, further exploration of the characters can be discussed in the classroom as well as comparing and contrasting this story with other versions making it a good choice for second grade through fifth grade.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shanna Gonzalez

    Zelinsky has done it again with his marvelous rendition of this classic fairy tale. His finely-detailed paintings capture the mood and marvel of this suspenseful story, in which a vulnerable young woman is three times required to accomplish the impossible task of spinning straw into gold, and she promises her firstborn to the gnome who offers to complete the task for her. When she has been made queen because of this feat he comes to collect his payment, and she must solve his impossible riddle t Zelinsky has done it again with his marvelous rendition of this classic fairy tale. His finely-detailed paintings capture the mood and marvel of this suspenseful story, in which a vulnerable young woman is three times required to accomplish the impossible task of spinning straw into gold, and she promises her firstborn to the gnome who offers to complete the task for her. When she has been made queen because of this feat he comes to collect his payment, and she must solve his impossible riddle to save her child. The fine illustrations carry most of the story -- the vast countryside in which the miller meets the king emphasizes the strange chance which brings her to the castle as well as the impulsive greed of the king. The rooms of straw progressively become vaster, and the spools of gold thread sparkle in their pile behind the spindle. The miller's daughter is beautifully portrayed in her innocent distress and queenly dignity, and her greedy, absent husband is shown for what he is as he enters the room, gesturing questioningly, while she triumphantly holds her child. The text that accompanies Zelinsky's paintings is well written, each word chosen for precision and economy, and builds to a wonderful climax. Rumpelstiltskin is one of the more popular of Grimm's fairy tales, and appears in many fairy-tale compilations. But a picture-book format provides an opportunity for a good artist to really draw out this story's timeless themes of greed, fear, despair, and maternal love, and the triumphant resolution of this story well balances its dark moments.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Devine

    The story begins with a greedy miller who sees the king riding through the countryside and wanting to impress the king, he boasts that his daughter can spin straw into gold. The king has the miller's daughter brought to the castle and locked in a room, from where she it told she must spin the straw into gold or she will die. The miller's daughter does not know what to do until a little man, who goes by the name Rumpelstiltskin, appears and offers her help for a gift in return. The first two time The story begins with a greedy miller who sees the king riding through the countryside and wanting to impress the king, he boasts that his daughter can spin straw into gold. The king has the miller's daughter brought to the castle and locked in a room, from where she it told she must spin the straw into gold or she will die. The miller's daughter does not know what to do until a little man, who goes by the name Rumpelstiltskin, appears and offers her help for a gift in return. The first two times she gives him jewelry and the third time she has no jewelry left to offer him so she promises to give him her first born son to him if she becomes queen. When she has a child the queen is so upset that he provides her with an offer which states that if she discovers his name before the three days are up then she can keep her child. With the help of a messenger she discovers his name and is able to keep her child. I liked this book as I think it has an interesting story-line with plenty of twists throughout. I also liked it due to the fabulous illustrations which are utilised to tell the story throughout the book. I think this book is suitable for both Key Stage 1 and 2. I think it could be read by the teacher as a whole class activity with the children joining in with words they know, or even simply describe the illustrations and explain what is happening in the story. I think Key Stage 2 could read the book individually as their confidence in reading grows and could be asked to discuss the character traits or themes like greed, pride and ambition which are found in the book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Asa Jacobs

    This story is about girl whose father had promised the king she could spin straw into gold. The king locked her in a room with straw and told her, "If you turn this straw into gold, you can keep your life." The girl didn't know what to do. Suddenly an little man appeared and spun the straw into gold in exchange for her necklace. The king kept wanting her to spin more and more straw into gold and the girl kept making deals with the little man. For spinning a room full of straw the girl agreed to This story is about girl whose father had promised the king she could spin straw into gold. The king locked her in a room with straw and told her, "If you turn this straw into gold, you can keep your life." The girl didn't know what to do. Suddenly an little man appeared and spun the straw into gold in exchange for her necklace. The king kept wanting her to spin more and more straw into gold and the girl kept making deals with the little man. For spinning a room full of straw the girl agreed to give the man her first born child. When the girl had her first child the man came to collect the baby. The girl asked what she could do to keep the child. The little man said if she could guess his name she could keep the child. The girl guessed for days and eventually sent a friend to spy on the little man. She heard him singing his name at his house and told the girl. The girl guessed, Rumpelstiltskin and was allowed to keep her child. This is a classic tale which raises many questions. What happened to the father who gave up his daughter? Would you be the life of another to save your own? These are just a few of the questions this book causes me to ask. These questions may be a bit tough for young children to answer but would be great for upper elementary students. Many of the Brothers Grimm stories provide challenging scenarios which can be used to help them grow and explore themselves. This is a quick and fun story that will surely remain in classrooms for many years to come.

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