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A Century Of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order

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This book is a gripping account of the murky world of the international oil industry and its role in world politics. Scandals about oil are familiar to most of us. From George W. Bush's election victory to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, US politics and oil enjoy a controversially close relationship. The US economy relies upon the cheap and unlimited supply of this singl This book is a gripping account of the murky world of the international oil industry and its role in world politics. Scandals about oil are familiar to most of us. From George W. Bush's election victory to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, US politics and oil enjoy a controversially close relationship. The US economy relies upon the cheap and unlimited supply of this single fuel. William Engdahl takes the reader through a history of the oil industry's grip on the world economy. His revelations are startling.


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This book is a gripping account of the murky world of the international oil industry and its role in world politics. Scandals about oil are familiar to most of us. From George W. Bush's election victory to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, US politics and oil enjoy a controversially close relationship. The US economy relies upon the cheap and unlimited supply of this singl This book is a gripping account of the murky world of the international oil industry and its role in world politics. Scandals about oil are familiar to most of us. From George W. Bush's election victory to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, US politics and oil enjoy a controversially close relationship. The US economy relies upon the cheap and unlimited supply of this single fuel. William Engdahl takes the reader through a history of the oil industry's grip on the world economy. His revelations are startling.

30 review for A Century Of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    Let me start by saying that I am a person who instinctively believes that international politics and economical dealings are filled with backdoor deals, self-interest and absolute disregard for common good and decency. A person with such attitude should be a prime target for the grand conspiracy theory presented in this book. Unfortunately for Engdahl, I have also been a student of history for over 25 years and I can say with some certainty that this book is a pile of stinking crap. Every cardi Let me start by saying that I am a person who instinctively believes that international politics and economical dealings are filled with backdoor deals, self-interest and absolute disregard for common good and decency. A person with such attitude should be a prime target for the grand conspiracy theory presented in this book. Unfortunately for Engdahl, I have also been a student of history for over 25 years and I can say with some certainty that this book is a pile of stinking crap. Every cardinal error a historian can make can also be found in this book. Presentation of conclusions without a shred of supporting evidence, wild allegations, distortion of facts alternatively omission of facts when that approach suits author's purpose better, factual mistakes and plain lies - this book is riddled with all of those. Furthermore, name of Lyndon LaRouche comes up quite often in "Century of War". This fact is important because vast majority of so called "references" Engdahl uses to support his fantasies for post-war period turn out to be publications from one of LaRouche's publishing houses. A quick investigation discloses that Engdahl and LaRouche are close buddies and exposes LaRouche as a complete fruitcake. This book consists to a large degree of conspiracy theories this man fabricated over the years. So please, before you pick up this book, do yourself a favor and do a little of your own research about those two gentlemen. If what you find out discourages you from wasting your time on this horrid collection of fantasies, good for you. If you decide to read it anyway... well, you've been warned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    You won’t know what to believe anymore after reading this book. It’s an insane but compelling economic history of the exploitation of the world under the guise of national strategy. It’s a treasure chest for the conspiracy theorist. Perhaps it should be subtitled: “And that’s why they hate us.” Engdahl has some far fetched accusations as he strings his economic history of the exploitation of oil by the Anglo-Americans. He indulges in guilt by association but he connects the dots in a compelling You won’t know what to believe anymore after reading this book. It’s an insane but compelling economic history of the exploitation of the world under the guise of national strategy. It’s a treasure chest for the conspiracy theorist. Perhaps it should be subtitled: “And that’s why they hate us.” Engdahl has some far fetched accusations as he strings his economic history of the exploitation of oil by the Anglo-Americans. He indulges in guilt by association but he connects the dots in a compelling manner. This is in the style of Howard Zinn as an expose that makes you feel ashamed to have a government like ours. If the Tea Party is trying to take the country back, well I’ve got news for them, we the people have never had the country, period. And if you’re trying to buy this book, good luck finding it. That sort of proves Engdahl’s point too, I guess.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aleks Bralić

    Početak 20. stoljeća: Britanija je bila carstvo u kojem sunce nikada ne zalazi. Kako se dogodilo da su se geopolitičke karte preslagale nekoliko puta u prošlom stoljeću? Svako preslagivanje moći i utjecaja onih koji su je imali u velikom opsegu, uslijedilo bi nakon krvavih ratova, izmeđuostalog i dva svjetska. Najradije bih počeo recenziju od činjenice da je Rudolf Diesel izumio novi stroj koji se pokreće na naftne prerađevine. Zašto je ovo bitno? Britanija je bila ranije spomenuto carstvo, upra Početak 20. stoljeća: Britanija je bila carstvo u kojem sunce nikada ne zalazi. Kako se dogodilo da su se geopolitičke karte preslagale nekoliko puta u prošlom stoljeću? Svako preslagivanje moći i utjecaja onih koji su je imali u velikom opsegu, uslijedilo bi nakon krvavih ratova, izmeđuostalog i dva svjetska. Najradije bih počeo recenziju od činjenice da je Rudolf Diesel izumio novi stroj koji se pokreće na naftne prerađevine. Zašto je ovo bitno? Britanija je bila ranije spomenuto carstvo, upravo zbog svoje ratne flote koja je mogla reagirati strateškom prednošću bilo gdje u svijetu. Zamislite stare "vapore" koji su bili pokretani stapnim parnim strojevima, zamislite koliko je ljudi trebalo opsluživati samo rad motora i zamislite ugljen kojim je trebalo postići temperaturu da bi ti strojevi s vanjskim izgaranjem mogli raditi. Uzmimo ratni brod, njegovu autonomnost, količinu ljudstva, goleme zapremine samo za ugalj i kotlove... Zar je čudno da je Rudolf Diesel nestao na brodu koji je išao u Britaniju 1913. godine? Bilo kako bilo, nafta kao energent je postala prioritet od najvišeg interesa. Autor dokumentirano pripovjeda o ratovima u prošlom stoljeću te silnicama koje su ih pokretale, gotovo sve iz interesa najjačih svjetskih sila. Ako niste čitali, a mislite da znate nešto o geopolitici i geostrategiji, odmah ću vam preporučiti Engdahla.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Impeccably researched and a convincing read. Having just finished it in January 2020 (a week after the US drone attack on Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad) I feel much more enlightened regarding the hidden agendas concerning US long term foreign policy. It is interesting to note, unfortunately, that since this book was written 15 years ago nothing much has changed. Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Dorje

    This is a highly interesting read about Oil, Banking and Geopolitics. It compliments work by Edwin Black on the relationship between Big Oil, Eugenics and the unfolding of Modern History. Some of the book verges on conspiracy theory, so it is a book to be read in relation to other sources to cross check on the ideas. But the overall thesis is interesting, and there is a lot of evidence given for most of the contentions. It fits with accounts in books like the Last Oil Shock, and with Edwin Black This is a highly interesting read about Oil, Banking and Geopolitics. It compliments work by Edwin Black on the relationship between Big Oil, Eugenics and the unfolding of Modern History. Some of the book verges on conspiracy theory, so it is a book to be read in relation to other sources to cross check on the ideas. But the overall thesis is interesting, and there is a lot of evidence given for most of the contentions. It fits with accounts in books like the Last Oil Shock, and with Edwin Blacks work on the relationship between corporate America and Nazi Germany. The most important insights are in relation to the financialisation of the UK and then the US Economy, and the geopolitical shift to stop promoting manufacturing growth in favour of seeking value through speculative investment globally. This is a Thesis explored in Fredrik Jameson and David Harvey's work as well in various forms, and fits also with discussions of the shifting composition of capital and the notion of surplus populations discussed by thinkers like Kalyan Sanyal. So this text opens up a topic that deserves more thorough academic treatment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Naeem

    Engdahl could learn how to write. Still, this is a history of oil and history of world political economy. It is conspiracy theory stuff at its best. Here was the best insight (for me): If the United States did not allow the 1973 oil shock -- usually most people end up blaming or venerating OPEC countries for their actions -- then the shock would never have happened. There is much, much more here. But there is an overlap between the themes of this book and the film Syriana. A worthwhile read for Engdahl could learn how to write. Still, this is a history of oil and history of world political economy. It is conspiracy theory stuff at its best. Here was the best insight (for me): If the United States did not allow the 1973 oil shock -- usually most people end up blaming or venerating OPEC countries for their actions -- then the shock would never have happened. There is much, much more here. But there is an overlap between the themes of this book and the film Syriana. A worthwhile read for those interested in the nexus of oil/middle east/global political economy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrei

    Just great. Need as many people read such books as possible.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    I follow Luke Gromen (Forest Through the Trees research firm) on twitter and on the MacroVoices podcast. I generally agree with him and highly regard his opinion, so when he strongly recommended this book, I thought I should check it out. Almost immediately, I could tell the book was a conspiracy theory type of thing. Ultimately, I think the book is mostly a pile of crap. It was definitely a different way to look at the history of the past 100 or so years. I actually love history and have been re I follow Luke Gromen (Forest Through the Trees research firm) on twitter and on the MacroVoices podcast. I generally agree with him and highly regard his opinion, so when he strongly recommended this book, I thought I should check it out. Almost immediately, I could tell the book was a conspiracy theory type of thing. Ultimately, I think the book is mostly a pile of crap. It was definitely a different way to look at the history of the past 100 or so years. I actually love history and have been reading a ton of books about this general time period from multiple authors with different perspectives. Engdahl just connects stuff tangentially that fits historical dates, but doesn't jive with anything else I have read from any source. For him to be correct, you have to believe that every politician was elected by a cabul of powerful oilmen and not because of any other event occurring in the US or England during the last 40 years. I thought his abiotic oil formation theory was interesting, but apparently, it isn't as clear cut as he suggests (I found websites on both sides of the issue: http://www.gasresources.net/energy_re..., https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/02/1...). Ultimately, I think events of the past 150 years are too complex to boil down to a Anglo-American conspiracy for oil. Does he tie a lot of points together that are true? Yes. The US definitely agreed to defend Saudi Arabia in exchange for the petro dollar. Does that mean Kissinger was a pawn for oilmen? I tend to doubt it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mehmet Dolapçıoğlu

    Interesting points however it is highly possible that mentioned points are more likely to be just wild conspiracy theories than truth...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marijan Medved

    It's ok.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Listed among the promotional blurbs on the back cover are a former oil minister from Saudi Arabia, an MIT school of management fellow, and the former minister of Guyana, giving an indication that Engdahl has more credibility than much of the other conspiratorial literature out there. Make no mistake though, Engdahl is firmly in the camp of new world order theory proponents; that a global totalitarian government is being covertly created by a small, mostly Anglo-American elite. A cursory look at Listed among the promotional blurbs on the back cover are a former oil minister from Saudi Arabia, an MIT school of management fellow, and the former minister of Guyana, giving an indication that Engdahl has more credibility than much of the other conspiratorial literature out there. Make no mistake though, Engdahl is firmly in the camp of new world order theory proponents; that a global totalitarian government is being covertly created by a small, mostly Anglo-American elite. A cursory look at the titles of his other works will confirm this, and at times Engdahl makes overreaching and questionable conclusions in 'A Century of War.' For example, he maintains that the spiritual counterculture of the 1960's was encouraged by members of the elite to destabilize American industry. What this book offers is an alternative, behind the scenes history of the 20th century. Engdahl makes a convincing case that with the transition from coal to oil powered industry, strategic control of oil has been a dominant factor of most major global conflicts well before the first gulf war. This includes both world wars, but also countless other conflicts, coups, assasinations, financial market manipulations, and other instruments of control and power. Some of the more hard hitting allegations Engdhal makes include that the OPEC oil embargos were deliberately planned by Anglo-American interests with one purpose being to ensnare and exploit developing countries with exploding levels of debt. He also argues that ever since the US gold standard was dropped by Nixon, the US has tacitly forced the rest of the world to accept the dollar as the world reserve currency by controling the global oil supply. This is a well researched, much needed, and deeply procative work that will generously reward readers looking to better understand what is really taking place as opposed to the 'official' version of history approved and propagated by the corporate controlled media.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob Prince

    I know, it sounds boring and political and it is both - and worse, at times Engdahl sees virtually everything - like the 1973 Middle East War and the implosion of Yugoslavia through the lenses of Anglo-American financial sector conspiracies. This is most unfortunate as it cheapens what would otherwise be an extraordinary book of genuine value. Global politics might not ALWAYS be financial sector conspiracies, but they often are and for the most part Engdahl has his finger on that pulse. He has a I know, it sounds boring and political and it is both - and worse, at times Engdahl sees virtually everything - like the 1973 Middle East War and the implosion of Yugoslavia through the lenses of Anglo-American financial sector conspiracies. This is most unfortunate as it cheapens what would otherwise be an extraordinary book of genuine value. Global politics might not ALWAYS be financial sector conspiracies, but they often are and for the most part Engdahl has his finger on that pulse. He has a fine sense of how starting as early as the late 1950s, the US gave up `production' as a way of mastering the global economy, turning instead to a combination of controlling oil, world finance and militarization. They do all go together more often than not. The best chapter - it is outstanding is about the deal cooked up by that evil genius and war criminal Henry Kissinger with the Saudis to raise the price of oil 400% and have most it recycled to the west in the form of financial investments. So despite its warts, I recommend this book highly. Will talk about it - critique and praise it tomorrow eve on a public radio program - oil and world power. Cheers,

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This is the book to read out of the ocean of books published on such subjects since 2001 (although it itself was written in the early 90's and updated for this more recent edition). It focuses on all the right subjects: oil + economic policies, war + economic interests of the US/UK, First World petroleum transnationals + Third World misery/subjugation, Anglo-American intelligence + less-than-public national goals. Engdahl, the author, places all these factors into perspective and gives you a cle This is the book to read out of the ocean of books published on such subjects since 2001 (although it itself was written in the early 90's and updated for this more recent edition). It focuses on all the right subjects: oil + economic policies, war + economic interests of the US/UK, First World petroleum transnationals + Third World misery/subjugation, Anglo-American intelligence + less-than-public national goals. Engdahl, the author, places all these factors into perspective and gives you a clear and concise history. Use this book as a particularly lucid and trenchant precis to present global events.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    hard to imagine that all those connections and practices can all be based on the greed on oil and power (where oil = power). No one has the proof that all these theories are really true. but when you read it, it makes perfect times. First worldwar, second worldwar... there seems to be a time-piece missing in the book though. Maybe the author had to leave it out?? Very haunting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    m shatley

    Starts well enough Yes England and her damned ambitions gold and oil drove the carnage of over two centuries of needless war. But those idiots in charge after ww2 were lucky to end up with a matching pair of socks from day-to-day,to imagine that uncontrolled events instead of otherwise is a step too far.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ermhm

    Writing is sometimes repetitive or lacking in structure, but there are not many books out there that will give you the big picture like 'A Century Of War' does. It should be read by everyone, and not just once.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A truly wortwhile work with a very decent factual base. The only downside is concentrating solely on geopolitics (almost without examining the nature of capitalism and economic crisises per se) and US/GB role in some events and conflicts. Still, a must-have for all interested in modern history.

  18. 4 out of 5

    K A T

    Great book, not what you read in traditional history books. A lot of info from what happens behind the scene.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jpmontz

    Excellent Summary of the History of the 20th century related to oil geopolitics

  20. 5 out of 5

    Дмитрий Кравченко

    good

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I lost this book half-way through, but holy shit was it good.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick Woodall

    This book really puts into perspective international politics, especially as the United States plays it. It is an eye-opener!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Vida

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justin Wiles

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samar Dahmash Jarrah

  26. 4 out of 5

    svartparad

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim Coraci

  28. 5 out of 5

    Quntilian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Monika Samardzija

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erwin

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