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The Circular Staircase and Other Works by Mary Roberts Rinehart (Halcyon Classics)

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This Halcyon Classics ebook collection includes twenty-three novels and stories by Mary Roberts Rinehart, often called the "American Agatha Christie." Rinehart is probably the source of the phrase "The butler did it", although she did not actually use this exact phrase in her writings. Rinehart originated the "Had-I-But-Known" school of mystery writing in her first book, T This Halcyon Classics ebook collection includes twenty-three novels and stories by Mary Roberts Rinehart, often called the "American Agatha Christie." Rinehart is probably the source of the phrase "The butler did it", although she did not actually use this exact phrase in her writings. Rinehart originated the "Had-I-But-Known" school of mystery writing in her first book, THE CIRCULAR STAIRCASE. Other noteworthy mysteries include THE BAT and THE CASE OF JENNIE BRICE. This ebook is DRM free and includes an active table of contents for easy navigation. Contents The Circular Staircase The Window at the White Cat When a Man Marries Where There’s a Will The Case of Jennie Brice The Street of Seven Stars The After House K Bab, A Sub-Deb Long Live the King The Amazing Interlude Dangerous Days A Poor Wise Man The Bat The Breaking Point The Truce of God Tish More Tish Affinities and Other Stories Love Stories Sight Unseen The Confession The Man in the Lower Ten This unexpurgated edition contains the complete text with errors and omissions corrected.


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This Halcyon Classics ebook collection includes twenty-three novels and stories by Mary Roberts Rinehart, often called the "American Agatha Christie." Rinehart is probably the source of the phrase "The butler did it", although she did not actually use this exact phrase in her writings. Rinehart originated the "Had-I-But-Known" school of mystery writing in her first book, T This Halcyon Classics ebook collection includes twenty-three novels and stories by Mary Roberts Rinehart, often called the "American Agatha Christie." Rinehart is probably the source of the phrase "The butler did it", although she did not actually use this exact phrase in her writings. Rinehart originated the "Had-I-But-Known" school of mystery writing in her first book, THE CIRCULAR STAIRCASE. Other noteworthy mysteries include THE BAT and THE CASE OF JENNIE BRICE. This ebook is DRM free and includes an active table of contents for easy navigation. Contents The Circular Staircase The Window at the White Cat When a Man Marries Where There’s a Will The Case of Jennie Brice The Street of Seven Stars The After House K Bab, A Sub-Deb Long Live the King The Amazing Interlude Dangerous Days A Poor Wise Man The Bat The Breaking Point The Truce of God Tish More Tish Affinities and Other Stories Love Stories Sight Unseen The Confession The Man in the Lower Ten This unexpurgated edition contains the complete text with errors and omissions corrected.

30 review for The Circular Staircase and Other Works by Mary Roberts Rinehart (Halcyon Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    A.J.

    Read from a 3-in-a-1 book ©1908 178 pages WHAT a dumb story! Story Summary—Rachel Innes is a spinster who took on the rearing of her nephew and niece (Halsey and Gertrude Innes) when their father (Rachel’s brother) died. Now the kids are 21 and 19, respectively, and Rachel needs to get out of the city (some major New England city—could be either New York or Boston, but I don’t believe it specified one in particular) while her townhouse is being redecorated. Halsey wants to go to the Adirondacks, and Read from a 3-in-a-1 book ©1908 178 pages WHAT a dumb story! Story Summary—Rachel Innes is a spinster who took on the rearing of her nephew and niece (Halsey and Gertrude Innes) when their father (Rachel’s brother) died. Now the kids are 21 and 19, respectively, and Rachel needs to get out of the city (some major New England city—could be either New York or Boston, but I don’t believe it specified one in particular) while her townhouse is being redecorated. Halsey wants to go to the Adirondacks, and Gertrude wishes to do something else (visit with friends, I think), so they talk their aunt into renting Sunnyside, a large Elizabethan country mansion. The second night there, it appears Sunnyside’s haunted: Rachel and her maid, Liddy, see a person standing outside on the veranda—who seems to vanish. The next night, Halsey and Gertrude spring (in an underhanded manner) the truth of why they wanted to go to the country: Halsey’s in love with Louise Armstrong (whose family owns Sunnyside), and Gertrude’s in love with Jack Bailey—each engaged, and Rachel’s never met Jack and has only a nodding acquaintance with Louise (though she does seem to know the girl’s mother/stepfather, if only slightly)! Stopping here a moment, I have to say that I lost all interest in what happened to Halsey and Gertrude from here on out. Granted it’s just a story, but I disliked both right off the bat. Spoiled and selfish. In real life (especially in the early 1900s), it’s the height of irresponsibility and disrespect to carry on a courtship with and become engaged to people your sole guardian has never met or barely knows! Your aunt didn’t have to take you in, but she did and reared you as her own—and you have the discourtesy to keep her in the dark about the single most important event of your life to date? No. To me, both prove they’re NOT mature enough for marriage. If there’s some reason you have to believe your ant won’t like your choice, then you seriously need to consider your choice, especially when you know your aunt’s level-headed and fair, open-minded, not one to be contrary or pretentious (as in “the gardener’s son is beneath our class and just not good enough for you”). And in the 1900s, good, respectable girls didn’t conduct themselves in such a manner, carrying on a secret affair with a boy her family doesn’t know—and a gentleman wouldn’t allow her to do so either. It may make for a “romantic” story or for “drama” later, but it doesn’t speak very highly of the pair involved. Having said that, we learn that Louise is a slight drama queen, and Jack is suspected of embezzling $1 million from the bank at which he works. Rachel wants proof before she can believe Jack’s innocent, especially since he hasn’t acted innocent but sketchy—and Gertrude throws a tantrum about how: “You are the only mother I ever had…I had given you all I would have given my mother had she lived, my love and trust. And now when I need you the most you fail me. I tell you, Jack Bailey is a good man, an honest man. If you say he’s not, you—you—’ ” (56). Spare me! So, because you’re hormonally biased in favor of Jack, your aunt must be, too, AND take your word for it? You? A girl who didn’t even have the common decency or honesty to let your aunt know you MET him, let alone fell for and are marrying him? Right. If that’s how you’d treat your mother, show her you love and trust, you need help. Of COURSE, your aunt’s not just going to take your word for it! She doesn’t know Jack Bailey from Adam. And then, later, when some of the mystery begins to unfold, Rachel’s being pulled in all directions and naturally forgets to mention an aspect of the case to Halsey (the jerk) and then, her memory’s jarred, and she relays to him what she’s just remembered, he has the unmitigated gall to say: “I wish you had told me that before” (85)! Oh, please! She’s been run ragged trying to keep your sorry butt from getting arrested because YOU'VE kept her in the dark the entire time—and you have the utter cheek to reprimand HER? Well, Rachel’s more of a saint than I because I would’ve told both ingrates to get to steppin’! And when the mystery’s solved, Rachel’s almost killed (a couple times) in the process—and it turns out Gertrude and Halsey knew so much more than either let on! In fact, one of the times when Rachel’s had a deep shock (and, really, with the sort of “haunting” scares going around, a shock could do in an older person’s heart quite easily) and faints, it turns out Gertrude was in on that particular instance and “waited anxiously by my side all night to see that I’d mend” (paraphrased). How sporting of her, really. Keep your surrogate mother in the dark with secrets and lies, almost get her killed, and stay up to make sure she doesn’t die from fright YOU helped induce! What familial love and devotion! For me, Rachel sums up the whole book/story best with: “If Halsey had only taken me fully into his confidence throughout the whole affair, it would’ve been much simpler….if…he had told me what he suspected, there would have been no further harrowing period for all of us. BUT YOUNG PEOPLE REFUSE TO PROFIT BY THE EXPERIENCE OF THEIR ELDERS, AND SOMETIMES THE ELDERS ARE THE ONES TO SUFFER” (123, emphasis mine). That’s pretty much the theme of this novel. Secrets and lies (both relating to most characters, not just the young) and melodramatic ways (this mostly deals with the young). Oh, and about the mystery, if you pay close attention, you shouldn’t be taken in the way all in the book are. I know I figured out “who done it” right away and only read on to see how all the characters put it together—chapters and chapters later, of course. Really, there’s no mystery here but only one logical conclusion. Grade: D

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terzah Horton

    I couldn't finish this one. The writing style was outdated and the story dragged. My son loved the book, so I'm sorry to have to disagree with him. I couldn't finish this one. The writing style was outdated and the story dragged. My son loved the book, so I'm sorry to have to disagree with him.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Thierer

    Interesting

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Scott

    Very enjoyable!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marcy O'Rourke

    Can't say enough good things about this book and this writer. Thank you Vicki for introducing me to her. Witty, cosmopolitan woman who solves mystery with verve, humanity and intelligence. WOW. Do yourself a favor if you love mysteries and read anything by Mary Roberts Rinehart. Can't say enough good things about this book and this writer. Thank you Vicki for introducing me to her. Witty, cosmopolitan woman who solves mystery with verve, humanity and intelligence. WOW. Do yourself a favor if you love mysteries and read anything by Mary Roberts Rinehart.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fran Crew

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Louise Mullins

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vickie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert Schaffer

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anja Murez

  18. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarahandus

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jodie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Noel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tara Courtice

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  30. 4 out of 5

    Selena Urquhart

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