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Glengarry Glen Ross (Modern Plays) (Modern Classics)

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Comic Drama Characters: 7 male 2 interior sets This scalding comedy took Broadway and London by storm and won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize. Here is Mamet at his very best, writing about small-time, cutthroat real estate salesmen trying to grind out a living by pushing plots of land on reluctant buyers in a never-ending scramble for their share of the American dream. Revived on Br Comic Drama Characters: 7 male 2 interior sets This scalding comedy took Broadway and London by storm and won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize. Here is Mamet at his very best, writing about small-time, cutthroat real estate salesmen trying to grind out a living by pushing plots of land on reluctant buyers in a never-ending scramble for their share of the American dream. Revived on Broadway in 2006 this masterpiece of American drama became a celebrated film which starred Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin and Alan Arkin. "Crackling tension...ferocious comedy and drama."-The New York Times "Wonderfully funny...A play to see, remember and cherish."-New York Post


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Comic Drama Characters: 7 male 2 interior sets This scalding comedy took Broadway and London by storm and won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize. Here is Mamet at his very best, writing about small-time, cutthroat real estate salesmen trying to grind out a living by pushing plots of land on reluctant buyers in a never-ending scramble for their share of the American dream. Revived on Br Comic Drama Characters: 7 male 2 interior sets This scalding comedy took Broadway and London by storm and won the 1984 Pulitzer Prize. Here is Mamet at his very best, writing about small-time, cutthroat real estate salesmen trying to grind out a living by pushing plots of land on reluctant buyers in a never-ending scramble for their share of the American dream. Revived on Broadway in 2006 this masterpiece of American drama became a celebrated film which starred Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin and Alan Arkin. "Crackling tension...ferocious comedy and drama."-The New York Times "Wonderfully funny...A play to see, remember and cherish."-New York Post

30 review for Glengarry Glen Ross (Modern Plays) (Modern Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    It is what I call crunch time-- the last two weeks of the year and attempting to wrap up loose ends in reading before the calendar turns a page. At last count I have five books to go and I hope I get to all five, but it will be a challenge. Before getting to those last five, I decided to get a jump start on a challenge I created for myself for next year. In addition to my Pulitzer challenge, I have decided to 'read Chicago' in 2018, selecting ten books across all genres for this challenge. These It is what I call crunch time-- the last two weeks of the year and attempting to wrap up loose ends in reading before the calendar turns a page. At last count I have five books to go and I hope I get to all five, but it will be a challenge. Before getting to those last five, I decided to get a jump start on a challenge I created for myself for next year. In addition to my Pulitzer challenge, I have decided to 'read Chicago' in 2018, selecting ten books across all genres for this challenge. These books can be memoirs, fiction, nonfiction, Pulitzer or Nobel winners, mysteries, plays, poetry, and even a personal favorite, baseball history books. I am looking forward to this challenge as it allows me to closely study my home city through literature. I guess it means I will need a new tenth book for this challenge, or make it ongoing and eventually read through a list I found, 40 books about Chicago that every Chicagoan should read. How I frame the challenge remains to be seen but it is going to be one near and dear to me and hopefully both fun and fulfilling. In searching for books that are essentially Chicago, I came across Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet, the 1984 Pulitzer winner for drama. With a script that I was able to read in an hour, I am now able to say that I read a play by Mamet, one of Chicago's leading playwrights. In this now modern classic, Mamet focuses on what he calls the cutthroat world of insurance salesmen. The cast features seven men in their forties and fifties who are all going after the big lead, the one that will net them thousands of dollars and bonuses that could mean a new Cadillac or the elusive trip to Hawaii. I found the script dated as it occurred pre internet, pre skype, and in order to make the big one, salesmen had to spend hours in their cars as they drove to potential clients homes, pitching their product to unsuspecting consumers. Now these sales pitches can take place in an office, on a phone, at a computer, saving salespeople hours of time and aggravation in commuting. As a result, the script appeared to be a touch dated, but powerful nonetheless. In the case of Glengarry, middle aged salesmen on the verge of being laid off attempted to resell condo units at a bogus track of land in Florida. Four men in their forties and another three in their fifties fought to be the one to sell the most condos, the most tracks of land, and see their names land on the top of the monthly leader board. Seeing that sales had for the most part dropped off, the office manager Williamson had created a contest pitting each salesman against each other, hoping that these aging all star pitchmen would find one last moment of glory in their careers. Mamet shows how the business is indeed ruthless as men who had worked together for their entire careers faced off hoping that they would be the one to take the family to Hawaii or ride in a Caddy. And the sales office ended up being the dog eat dog world that Mamet had envisioned as each character whined and attempted to kiss up to the boss in hopes that he would be the favored employee when bonuses were given out at the end of the year. Glengarry Glen Ross also won an Oscar for best picture in 1992. It was not without controversy as characters swear nonstop as their frustration level grew to high levels. Reading through the script, I noted many words not suitable for underage readers or movie goers, and, after checking, the movie version of this award winning play is indeed rated R. I found Mamet's work to be powerful and one that is more suitable on stage than in written form, especially here as the entire play is centered on human face to face interaction rather than plot development. Glengarry Glen Ross allowed me to witness a sliver of society that is slowly fading away as the world grows smaller. It is a powerful piece of literature showing the ruthlessness of salesmen, and one worthy of the awards bestowed on both the drama and movie version, and a script I would most likely enjoy the most on stage rather than film. With 2018 a fortnight away, I am looking forward to my Read Chicago challenge. Glengarry Glen Ross was a quick introduction to this challenge and is making me look forward to other books centered in the city that I love. I hope to read at least one Pulitzer winner in each category for the challenge, so I can now cross award winning drama off of my list. 4 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    "Always be closing." I have seen this performed a couple times and see the film regularly just to get the love of language in it firmly in my head. This won the Pulitzer Prize in 1984 and deserves it. It's about a "down times" real estate agency in Chicago, a recession, properties are just not moving, and the company sets up a kind of contest to encourage its salesmen to work harder. But it's the heart of a neo-liberal system, the guys who are selling the most at this time are given what few "pri "Always be closing." I have seen this performed a couple times and see the film regularly just to get the love of language in it firmly in my head. This won the Pulitzer Prize in 1984 and deserves it. It's about a "down times" real estate agency in Chicago, a recession, properties are just not moving, and the company sets up a kind of contest to encourage its salesmen to work harder. But it's the heart of a neo-liberal system, the guys who are selling the most at this time are given what few "prime" leads that are available. Lame guys just trying to break in, new guys, or older guys down on their luck, having a "bad streak, because it works in streaks," the dice are loaded against them, the cards are marked. Two days in an office, and over night there's a break-in, the leads are stolen, but hey, the contest is still on. I know, you are a literary reader, or you read romances for fun, who wants to read about a real estate office in the eighties, not one of them truly admirable in any way?! But you do! You just didn't know you did until now. But listen to it or see the amazing movie version with Jack Lemmon. Set in Mamet's Chicago, where he worked in a real estate office during the sixties, this captures (male) Chicago language rhythms, and American business talk and makes it poetry, just as Harold Pinter does in The Caretaker or The Birthday Party or Betrayal. Or Albee's Virginia Wolff. As good as my other Mamet favorite, American Buffalo, profane and crisp and just crackling with wit and working class desperation. The Death of a Salesman territory, or Seth's Clyde Fans salesmen. Who cares if Mamet is politically conservative now or that I disagree with so much he has to say in his non-fiction. He can write. Always be closing, my friends: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AO_t7... Nighthawks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LYn1... Always be Quarantining, a parody with American Girl dolls: https://www.thewrap.com/kathryn-hahn-...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Glengarry Glen Ross: a play‬, David Mamet Glengarry Glen Ross is a play by David Mamet that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1984. The play shows parts of two days in the lives of four desperate Chicago real estate agents who are prepared to engage in any number of unethical, illegal acts—from lies and flattery to bribery, threats, intimidation and burglary—to sell undesirable real estate to unwitting prospective buyers. It is based on Mamet's experience having previously worked in a similar office. تار Glengarry Glen Ross: a play‬, David Mamet Glengarry Glen Ross is a play by David Mamet that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1984. The play shows parts of two days in the lives of four desperate Chicago real estate agents who are prepared to engage in any number of unethical, illegal acts—from lies and flattery to bribery, threats, intimidation and burglary—to sell undesirable real estate to unwitting prospective buyers. It is based on Mamet's experience having previously worked in a similar office. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سی و یکم ماه اکتبر سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: گلن‌گری گلن راس - نمایشنامه ای از دیوید مامت؛ نویسنده: دیوید (ممت) مامت؛ مترجم: امید روشن ضمیر؛ تهران، نیلا، 1386، در 108 ص؛ گلن‌گری گلن راس نام نمایشنامه‌ ای است اثر دیوید مَمِت که در سال 1984 میلادی جایزهٔ پولیتزر گرفته است. این نمایشنامه داستانِ دو روز از زندگیِ چهار کارمند معاملات املاک در شیکاگو و شرحِ بی‌ اخلاقی‌هایی است که آن‌ها در این شغل مرتکب می‌شوند. ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Let me start by being perfectly clear: I'm not a fan of David Mamet. Read Oleanna: did not care for it. Read his view on actors/acting/women: completely disagree with him. But there is no denying that he is iconic in post-Cold War American Theatre. And up until now, I had not had any incentive to pick up this 1984 Pulitzer Prize winner coveted by almost every male colleague I have ever worked with in theatre. So I gave him one last shot. And this was the final nail in the Mamet coffin for me. Th Let me start by being perfectly clear: I'm not a fan of David Mamet. Read Oleanna: did not care for it. Read his view on actors/acting/women: completely disagree with him. But there is no denying that he is iconic in post-Cold War American Theatre. And up until now, I had not had any incentive to pick up this 1984 Pulitzer Prize winner coveted by almost every male colleague I have ever worked with in theatre. So I gave him one last shot. And this was the final nail in the Mamet coffin for me. The story is paltry. The isn't a single redeeming quality to any of these characters. They slur through their dialogue like they're drunk, stopping short on nearly every thought - occasionally, several times in one "sentence". And then there is the language, which honestly would not bother me, if it were not so excessive as to completely distract from the story itself; it's unpoetic, and quite frankly, un-theatrical. Of course there are those who will champion his realism, his unbridled placement of the mirror up to American nature, but doing so with grace, poetry (however subtle) and catharsis is the key to truly dynamic theatre. Albee, Miller, Wilson, and Williams, to name a few, understand this. I'm sure if Mamet was here, he would gladly tell me to go f*** myself, and that's fine, though I would kindly advise that I received enough of that sentiment from the play.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zsa Zsa

    Meh! Too American dream for me. I loved the play by Parsa Piroozfar though.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erin the Avid Reader ⚜BFF's with the Cheshire Cat⚜

    FINAL RATING: 3.5 OUT OF 5 STARS I remember in an English class I was attending a couple years ago, the topic of Mamet suddenly came up and my teacher wanted each and every one of us to read a scene from American Buffalo. When we were done, my professor wanted us to tell him what we analyzed from the piece of writing. A girl sitting next to me raised her hand and said "I find his situations realistic yet the dialogue surreal and disjointed." To this day, that response still sticks with me, even th FINAL RATING: 3.5 OUT OF 5 STARS I remember in an English class I was attending a couple years ago, the topic of Mamet suddenly came up and my teacher wanted each and every one of us to read a scene from American Buffalo. When we were done, my professor wanted us to tell him what we analyzed from the piece of writing. A girl sitting next to me raised her hand and said "I find his situations realistic yet the dialogue surreal and disjointed." To this day, that response still sticks with me, even thought I feel like she was wrong one thing about Mamet: His dialogue is not surreal. In fact, I find that Mamet writes colloquialism more realistically than any other author or playwright I've ever read. People do not talk like those long, whimsical dialogues they wrote in Victorian novels and Shakespearean plays (even if it would make life more fun). People talk in strange, disjointed, often confusing ways. Mamet captures realistic conversation well, but get used to seeing ellipses. Mamet loves them...and I see why he used them. Despite the three star rating I have decided to give Glengarry Glen Ross, I actually liked it quite a bit; even if I didn't figure the play was simply about was the machinations of a sales office until around Act II. It made me chortle here and there, and I can envision the dour characters Mamet decided to portray could (and do) exist all-to commonly in real life. However, I can't find myself giving this play any more than what I've rated it. Maybe I would have loved it more if I had more experiences in a stressful, tight-knit work environment such as sales. This play is more about interaction than work, however, so maybe it just wasn't my cup of tea. Mamet was attempting to write the eloquent yet realistic prose of Harold Pinter, which must have been a difficult task in itself. David Mamet, from what I've seen and how I've perceived it, has earned his spot along with other American playwrights such as Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller as some of the greatest playwrights in the Western World, even if they mostly explore middle-class, blue-collar, white-guy problems. It is because of this reason I find Pinter's work to be far superior.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Bitzenhofer

    Honestly, I thought I'd hate this play. Then I saw it with Liev Schreiber and Alan Alda and was engrossed. This is an incredibly hard play to pull off on stage (there's something about Mamet's stylized dialogue that requires truly talented actors). Probably one of the ten best productions I've ever seen. I mention the staged version because you really get a clear sense of the "feel" of this play from reading it. I can't say it's for everyone; the language is strong and it's decidedly, well, male Honestly, I thought I'd hate this play. Then I saw it with Liev Schreiber and Alan Alda and was engrossed. This is an incredibly hard play to pull off on stage (there's something about Mamet's stylized dialogue that requires truly talented actors). Probably one of the ten best productions I've ever seen. I mention the staged version because you really get a clear sense of the "feel" of this play from reading it. I can't say it's for everyone; the language is strong and it's decidedly, well, male. Nonetheless, it is worth reading.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carac Allison

    I once heard "Glengarry Glen Ross" described as the other great American play about salesmen. In truth there are many great American plays that explore the capricious game of selling that is the soul of Capitalism. But this is, indeed, in the top two. I have always liked it more than "Death of a Salesman" but I know I'm in the minority on that and no one can deny Miller's Willy Loman. This is Mamet at the absolute peak of his powers. It doesn't read like a play so much as a transcript typed up f I once heard "Glengarry Glen Ross" described as the other great American play about salesmen. In truth there are many great American plays that explore the capricious game of selling that is the soul of Capitalism. But this is, indeed, in the top two. I have always liked it more than "Death of a Salesman" but I know I'm in the minority on that and no one can deny Miller's Willy Loman. This is Mamet at the absolute peak of his powers. It doesn't read like a play so much as a transcript typed up from hidden audio surveillance. All the characters are hustling all the time. We learn the sad details of their personal lives only through inference and confusing asides. It's funny and profane and the tragic end is as cathartic as any Greek classic. This is a play that often gets amateur productions in mid-sized cities and on campuses. If you see a poster, go and see it. If you don't see a poster then watch the movie with Pacino, Lemmon, Spacey, Arkin and Alec Baldwin. If you ever get around to reading the actual stageplay you'll be disappointed that Baldwin's part is a cinematic addition but there it is. Actually here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kZg_... :) Carac

  9. 5 out of 5

    TheBookWarren

    4.75 Stars — Infinitely quote-able and a dark pleasure for anyone that’s worked in a sales environment. Mamet nails the essence of what it means when corporate needs tangle with personal demons.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jigar Brahmbhatt

    I always enjoy the typical Mamet-speak, be it in his films or in his plays. The sardonic, street-smart dialogues his characters speak are so effective on ears that they seem to deny the fact that a film should need a plot. The dialogues, like a structured symphony, carry the reader/viewer from one situation to another, with the plot slowly revealing itself, with the true nature of the characters coming out through their actions as they con one another, and we don't realize till the very end that I always enjoy the typical Mamet-speak, be it in his films or in his plays. The sardonic, street-smart dialogues his characters speak are so effective on ears that they seem to deny the fact that a film should need a plot. The dialogues, like a structured symphony, carry the reader/viewer from one situation to another, with the plot slowly revealing itself, with the true nature of the characters coming out through their actions as they con one another, and we don't realize till the very end that the biggest con in the whole ordeal is yet to be played, the one Mamet ends up playing on the audience. I always hate when a Mamet film/play gets over, coz I won't ever have the fun to view/read it for the first time. "Glengarry Glen Ross" is the best he has ever written. It captures the anger, frustration, and predicament of the real-state agents and the dead-end jobs they are stuck in. Their tiring efforts to sell unsalable properties to unwilling clients is no less thrilling than a thriller. In the end, you realize that it is in a way the story of every working person. I re-read scenes from this play just to see how handsomely Mamet handles each and every narrative cord of this angry yet enjoyable drama. From the so very well-written first scene, when Blake enters the office and gives the salesmen the so-called 'motivational speech' telling them to close the deals or get fired the play gets its momentum. And scene after scene it never looses it. Mamet never sets a foot wrong. Howard Hawks once said that a good film (I take it for drama in general, be it on-screen or on-stage) should have at least three good scenes. Well, this one has oodles!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Who am I to argue with a Pulitzer Prize winner? But, wow, the amount of repetition and extraneous verbiage is surprising. Some of it creates beats and perhaps captures the reality of speech. Still, that seems way overdone. And why do it? Aside from that Mamet is great at showing character via dialogue. And the most famous scene from the movie is not even in the play.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Bullshit! It's all about the...are you fucking listening to me? All I'm saying...now wait a second...study THE DIALOGUE. What? Fuck stage directions. Bullshit! It's all about the...are you fucking listening to me? All I'm saying...now wait a second...study THE DIALOGUE. What? Fuck stage directions.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    Glengarry Glen Ross is a play by David Mamet that has won accolades across the board, been featured in the National Theatre of London, been on Broadway, and made into a movie (starring Al Pacino, Alec Baldwin, Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, Kevin Spacey - I mean holy heavens Batman that is some serious casting). The action takes place over two days in two settings: a Chinese restaurant and a real estate office. The characters are real estate agents from Chicago trying to sell swampland in Fl Glengarry Glen Ross is a play by David Mamet that has won accolades across the board, been featured in the National Theatre of London, been on Broadway, and made into a movie (starring Al Pacino, Alec Baldwin, Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, Kevin Spacey - I mean holy heavens Batman that is some serious casting). The action takes place over two days in two settings: a Chinese restaurant and a real estate office. The characters are real estate agents from Chicago trying to sell swampland in Florida to unwilling buyers, and they will lie, cheat, bribe, and in general be insufferable to do so. Their immorality doesn't stop with schmoozing average joes; they are also ridiculous to each other and willing to do just about anything, including steal, to make a buck. In other words, they are terrible people. I am entirely unsure how I feel about this play. I picked it up from the library on a whim. I was just walking around finding where things were (my first time in this particular library) and the title jumped out at me, being as it was familiar. I brought it home and read it during a blackout. I just love it when we lose electricity; that is some serious guilt free reading time in my opinion. I think my main problem with the play was the language. No one finished their freaking sentences. Like ever. I can see swindly egocentric men getting a bit phrase-ish when they get excited, but trying to read a play where every single character has difficulty forming a complete thought is taxing. I wonder if the film version is better; there's no way they made the movie true to the play as far as dialogue and action. Otherwise the movie would be extremely short and dull; after all, the entire play is conversations. With that cast of actors, it shouldn't be too difficult a movie to watch. As for what I did like about the play, first and foremost, it was interesting to watch listen to read about such horrible people. They were such over the top stereotypes of swindlers and listening to them complain and scheme was a bit entertaining. Overall, I can't give a solid recommendation. I'm glad I read it, but I definitely won't be reading it again.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    What's the difference, really, between making shady real estate deals and selling property to people on the financial edge, and robbing an office owned by the rich assholes who get rich on the proceeds of those shady real estate deals? One robs the poor to give to the rich and one robs from the rich out of spite. Glengarry Glen Ross is all about this question and nothing at all about this question. Its cast of characters are utterly unlikable; there is no one in the cast to sympathize with, what What's the difference, really, between making shady real estate deals and selling property to people on the financial edge, and robbing an office owned by the rich assholes who get rich on the proceeds of those shady real estate deals? One robs the poor to give to the rich and one robs from the rich out of spite. Glengarry Glen Ross is all about this question and nothing at all about this question. Its cast of characters are utterly unlikable; there is no one in the cast to sympathize with, whatever slivers of their personal stories we get; and unethical behaviour -- regardless of legalities -- dominates the proceedings. There is no one to like, nothing to care about, and Glengarry Glen Ross makes me hope I never meet men like the men in this play. Sounds like a shitty experience, right? Such is the power of Mamet's dialogue, however -- operating here at its very best -- that a path is worn for us to cut through the morass of action and character. Watching or listening (as I did this time to a strong staging from L.A. Theatreworks, with an excellent performance by Joe Mantegna and a seemingly drunken performance by Richard Dreyfuss) to this play doesn't feel like watching or listening to a performance. When performed well, when the cadence of Mamet's words -- the overlaps, the repetitions, the rhythms -- are done right, it is like sitting in an office full of assholes and watching them try to out-asshole one another. It's mesmerizing, and there may be no playwright who has ever come so close to capturing the true speech of a time and place as David Mamet.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    I decided to listen to this because it was short, and because I've never seen Glengarry Glen Ross, and it's one of those things in the cultural zeitgeist with which I should be familiar. But it turns out that Glengarry Glen Ross is about (white) men talking about making money, which is basically the Venn diagram of things about which I do not care. So . . . this is a bunch of men talking to each other about selling things, and how much they want to do that, and how much they love it when it's goin I decided to listen to this because it was short, and because I've never seen Glengarry Glen Ross, and it's one of those things in the cultural zeitgeist with which I should be familiar. But it turns out that Glengarry Glen Ross is about (white) men talking about making money, which is basically the Venn diagram of things about which I do not care. So . . . this is a bunch of men talking to each other about selling things, and how much they want to do that, and how much they love it when it's going well, and hate it when it isn't. Mostly they tear each other down, though sometimes they back each other up. (I liked those parts best.) It's hard to tell people apart who aren't Richard Dreyfuss, but that doesn't really matter. Because they're really all the same. It's short.

  16. 4 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    This is a sort-of play that you have to be in a particular mood to fully appreciate. It is about the inner-depths of the sales-world profession and as dark a modern comedy that one can think of. I think it is funny, but it is not for the faint of heart. Also, this play must set the record for most profanity per minute in any medium.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    It was hard for me to fully envision the characters by just reading it in play form, I'd like to see how the live play would interpret them. Even though the characters were a little gappy for me, I still thought they were great, and the story was fast paced and engaging. Looking forward to watching the movie. It was hard for me to fully envision the characters by just reading it in play form, I'd like to see how the live play would interpret them. Even though the characters were a little gappy for me, I still thought they were great, and the story was fast paced and engaging. Looking forward to watching the movie.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Late capitalism is a nightmare, but in this case great for reading out loud.

  19. 4 out of 5

    August Braddock

    I keep trying to convince myself that I like Mamet and... I just don’t.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chad Parenteau

    Reread this recently. The only reason I don't give this five stars is because this is the one exception I can think of where the movie (also written by Mamet) is better than the book, though the immorality of just about everyone involved is much more stark in the original version. A must for anyone who has ever tried to sell anything, dispelling myths and revealing the truths behind the salesman mentality no one brings up: the false friendships among co-workers, the betrayals, the racism, the hy Reread this recently. The only reason I don't give this five stars is because this is the one exception I can think of where the movie (also written by Mamet) is better than the book, though the immorality of just about everyone involved is much more stark in the original version. A must for anyone who has ever tried to sell anything, dispelling myths and revealing the truths behind the salesman mentality no one brings up: the false friendships among co-workers, the betrayals, the racism, the hypocrisy (calling people who don't want to buy what they can't afford or don't want "deadbeats" is hilarious to me--and dead on). All this and more as four salesman struggle to maintain for potential buyers (and themselves) the romantic image of the salesman while committing sin after sin in their petty inner circle.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    The dedication is to Harold Pinter - the best thing Pinter did, and there are some fantastic plays in there, is encourage this guy. Glengarry Glen Ross reads like Pinter rewritten (almost entirely) by George V Higgins and William Gaddis with an Arthur Miller polish. A masterwork and then some. The cadence, the tight, dizzying jazz of the vacillating (in and out of personas) exchanges, the funny, tautological, uncanny idiomatic ferocity and whip-smart bellicosity of it...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liana

    It's kind of got too much man and their misguided ideals. If it's a man's world, it's pretty petty and terribly macho. It's kind of got too much man and their misguided ideals. If it's a man's world, it's pretty petty and terribly macho.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nickolette

    ROMA You think you're queer...? I'm going to tell you something: we're all queer. You think that you're a thief? So what? You get befuddled by a middle-class morality...? Get shut of it. Shut it out. You cheated on your wife...? You did it, live with it. (pause) You fuck little girls, so be it. There's an absolute morality? May be. And then what? If you think there is, then be that thing. Bad people go to hell? I don't think so. If you think that, act that way. A hell exists on earth? Yes. I w ROMA You think you're queer...? I'm going to tell you something: we're all queer. You think that you're a thief? So what? You get befuddled by a middle-class morality...? Get shut of it. Shut it out. You cheated on your wife...? You did it, live with it. (pause) You fuck little girls, so be it. There's an absolute morality? May be. And then what? If you think there is, then be that thing. Bad people go to hell? I don't think so. If you think that, act that way. A hell exists on earth? Yes. I won't live in it. That's me. You ever take a dump made you feel you'd just slept for twelve hours...? LINGK Did I...? ROMA Yes. LINGK I don't know. ROMA Or a piss...? A great meal fades in reflection. Everything else gains. You know why? 'Cause it's only food. This shit we eat, it keeps us going. But it's only food. The great fucks that you may have had. What do you remember about them? LINGK What do I...? ROMA Yes. LINGK Mmmm... ROMA I don't know. For me, I'm saying, what is is, it's probably not the orgasm. Some broads, forearms on your neck, something her eyes did. There was a sound she made...or, me, lying, in the, I'll tell you: me lying in bed; the next day she brought me cafe au lait. She gives me a cigarette, my balls feel like concrete. Eh? What I'm saying, what is our life? (pause) It's looking forward or it's looking back. And that's our life. That's it. Where is the moment? (pause) And what is it that we're afraid of? Loss. What else? (pause) The bank closes. We get sick, my wife died on a plane, the stock market collapsed...the house burnt down...what of these happen...? None on 'em. We worry anyway. What does this mean? I'm not secure. How can I be secure? (pause) Through amassing wealth beyond all measure? No. And what's beyond all measure? That's a sickness. That's a trap. There is no measure. Only greed. How can we act? (MORE) ROMA (CONT'D) The right way, we would say, to deal with this: "There is a one-in- a-million chance that so and so will happen...Fuck it, it won't happen to me..." No. We know that's not the right way I think. (pause) We say the correct way to deal with this is "There is a one-in-so-and- so chance this will happen...God protect me. I am powerless, let it not happen to me..." But no to that. I say. There's something else. What is it? "If it happens, AS IT MAY for that is not within our powers, I will deal with it, just as I do today with what draws my concern today." I say this is how we must act. I do those things which seem correct to me today. I trust myself. And if security concerns me, I do that which today I think will make me secure. And every day I do that, when that day arrives that I need a reserve, [a] odds are that I have it, and [b] the true reserve that I have is the strength that I have of acting each day without fear. (pause) According to the dictates of my mind.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Anderson

    This is a play. I could not put it down. It’s basically two days in the stressful lives of high-end real estate salesmen. The whole play is them arguing with and yelling at each other, with the plot unfolding around that (I guess like any other play). This was a great read. Now I need to see the movie.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lea Dokter

    Not my cup of tea. Two stars because it is well-written, but the plot and characters were not comprehensible and reading it is quite annoying. Seeing it as a play might make a huge difference, though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ellen McWhirter

    I know that Mamet is a genius but I just don't like his tone. All seems bleak in his worlds. I know that Mamet is a genius but I just don't like his tone. All seems bleak in his worlds.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    #20BooksOfSummer 2019 Finished: 01.06.2019 Genre: play Rating: B Conclusion: Reading time: 1 hr 30 min Dialogue has a rhythm a beat the never lets up. I zipped through this clever and vicious script. In the case of Glengarry Glen Ross I think the movie makes more impact than the play on Kindle. While reading I pictured Al Pacino (Oscar nominee Best Supp Actor 1993) Jack Lemmon, Kevin Spacey, Alan Arkin and Ed Harris...tearing each other apart! Nr 13 on List Best 50 plays in the past 100 years. #MustRead Mod #20BooksOfSummer 2019 Finished: 01.06.2019 Genre: play Rating: B Conclusion: Reading time: 1 hr 30 min Dialogue has a rhythm a beat the never lets up. I zipped through this clever and vicious script. In the case of Glengarry Glen Ross I think the movie makes more impact than the play on Kindle. While reading I pictured Al Pacino (Oscar nominee Best Supp Actor 1993) Jack Lemmon, Kevin Spacey, Alan Arkin and Ed Harris...tearing each other apart! Nr 13 on List Best 50 plays in the past 100 years. #MustRead Modern Classic

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carlton Duff

    Overriding theme: the world is full of back biters & back stabbers and the workplace will magnify this. Didn’t need further instruction in this lesson. I remember thinking the movie was good when I watched it many years ago, but after reading the play I don’t feel like revisiting it, which I was hoping I would when I bought the book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Louis Spirito

    Written between American Buffalo and Speed The Plow, Glengarry is yet another withering look at men - this time, real estate hustlers - going about the business of the shady craft. Unlike the movie, the play focusses on the a minor office theft that highlights the moral bankruptcy of their universe.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Oisín

    tl;dr capitalism turns men into dicks I feel I might have gotten this more if I actually understood how real estate works!

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