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Arthur ​Miller számos olyan kritikus hangvételű vagy mély gondolatokat tartalmazó esszét, cikket és tanulmányt írt, amelyekkel ugyanolyan mély hatást gyakorol olvasóira, mint darabjaival a színházak közönségére. E kötetben korábban kiadatlan – esetenként önéletrajz jellegű – munkáit gyűjtöttük össze, amelyek világosan, drámai kegyetlenséggel, időnként mérnöki precizitással Arthur ​Miller számos olyan kritikus hangvételű vagy mély gondolatokat tartalmazó esszét, cikket és tanulmányt írt, amelyekkel ugyanolyan mély hatást gyakorol olvasóira, mint darabjaival a színházak közönségére. E kötetben korábban kiadatlan – esetenként önéletrajz jellegű – munkáit gyűjtöttük össze, amelyek világosan, drámai kegyetlenséggel, időnként mérnöki precizitással domborítják ki a 20. század második felének bizonyos eseményeit. Az esszék némelyike megvilágítja a világot egykor és azóta is foglalkoztató történések meghökkentő hátterét, egyéb művei az egyre sikeresebbé váló író életének jeleneteit mutatják be. Miller érdekes, időnként sokkoló véleményt formált a világháborúról, a holokausztról, az antiszemitizmusról, az 50-es és 60-as években Kelet-Európában zajló eseményekről. Erősen foglalkoztatta, hogy a harcokból hősként vagy vesztesként hazatérő katonák hogyan képesek visszailleszkedni a civil hétköznapokba, megvizsgálta azt a hisztérikus antikommunizmust, amely bizonyos időszakban Amerikát


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Arthur ​Miller számos olyan kritikus hangvételű vagy mély gondolatokat tartalmazó esszét, cikket és tanulmányt írt, amelyekkel ugyanolyan mély hatást gyakorol olvasóira, mint darabjaival a színházak közönségére. E kötetben korábban kiadatlan – esetenként önéletrajz jellegű – munkáit gyűjtöttük össze, amelyek világosan, drámai kegyetlenséggel, időnként mérnöki precizitással Arthur ​Miller számos olyan kritikus hangvételű vagy mély gondolatokat tartalmazó esszét, cikket és tanulmányt írt, amelyekkel ugyanolyan mély hatást gyakorol olvasóira, mint darabjaival a színházak közönségére. E kötetben korábban kiadatlan – esetenként önéletrajz jellegű – munkáit gyűjtöttük össze, amelyek világosan, drámai kegyetlenséggel, időnként mérnöki precizitással domborítják ki a 20. század második felének bizonyos eseményeit. Az esszék némelyike megvilágítja a világot egykor és azóta is foglalkoztató történések meghökkentő hátterét, egyéb művei az egyre sikeresebbé váló író életének jeleneteit mutatják be. Miller érdekes, időnként sokkoló véleményt formált a világháborúról, a holokausztról, az antiszemitizmusról, az 50-es és 60-as években Kelet-Európában zajló eseményekről. Erősen foglalkoztatta, hogy a harcokból hősként vagy vesztesként hazatérő katonák hogyan képesek visszailleszkedni a civil hétköznapokba, megvizsgálta azt a hisztérikus antikommunizmust, amely bizonyos időszakban Amerikát

30 review for A View from the Bridge: A Play in Two Acts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    Miller wrote over three dozen stage plays in his career and this one is considered to be in the top four or five. It first premiered unsuccessfully on Broadway in 1955 as a one act play. So Miller rewrote it as a two act play which premiered in London's West End in 1956. It's a tragic play set in 1950's New York City in an Italian American neighborhood in view of the Brooklyn Bridge. It's a story of family, love, jealousy, prejudice, immigration, all themes that still ring familiar with todays a Miller wrote over three dozen stage plays in his career and this one is considered to be in the top four or five. It first premiered unsuccessfully on Broadway in 1955 as a one act play. So Miller rewrote it as a two act play which premiered in London's West End in 1956. It's a tragic play set in 1950's New York City in an Italian American neighborhood in view of the Brooklyn Bridge. It's a story of family, love, jealousy, prejudice, immigration, all themes that still ring familiar with todays audiences.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Arthur Miller’s 1955 A View From the Bridge has the feeling of a Greek tragedy, but it’s set in working-class 1950s Brooklyn, in the Red Hook neighborhood with “a view from the bridge.” I heard it (again) this past couple days in an audiotaped version by the LA Theater Works, starring Ed O’Neill as longshoreman Eddie Carbone, who is married to Beatrice and also raising his eighteen-year old orphaned niece Catherine. The tale is in part narrated in the style of a Greek chorus by lawyer Alfieri, w Arthur Miller’s 1955 A View From the Bridge has the feeling of a Greek tragedy, but it’s set in working-class 1950s Brooklyn, in the Red Hook neighborhood with “a view from the bridge.” I heard it (again) this past couple days in an audiotaped version by the LA Theater Works, starring Ed O’Neill as longshoreman Eddie Carbone, who is married to Beatrice and also raising his eighteen-year old orphaned niece Catherine. The tale is in part narrated in the style of a Greek chorus by lawyer Alfieri, whom Eddie Carbone goes to for legal advice. At the end, the lawyer reflects on the nature of Catherine, in whom he still finds something to admire: “Most of the time now we settle for half and I like it better. But the truth is holy, and even as I known how wrong he was, and his death useless, I tremble, for I confess that something perversely pure calls to me from his memory- not purely good, but himself purely, for he allowed himself to be wholly known and for that I think I will love him more than all my sensible clients. And yet, it is better to settle for half, it must be! And so I mourn him- I admit -with a certain. . . alarm.” Miller said that he heard the basic account that developed into the plot of A View from the Bridge from a lawyer who worked with longshoremen, who related it to him as a true story. The play was first produced as a one-act, then developed into a (better) two-act play. Eddie, in his zeal to raise Catherine, becomes what seems to his wife (and others) improperly obsessed with (as in borderline-“interested in”) her niece. It’s been an amusing cliché, I suppose, that fathers protect their daughters and have a complicated relationship with the boys that pursue them, but Eddie seems to cross over into dangerous territory. As Alfieri, in his truth-telling, chorus function tells Eddie, “You want somethin' else, Eddie, and you can never have her!” When Beatrice helps to bring two cousins (illegally) from Italy to live with them, and one of them, Rudolpho, falls in love with Catherine, Eddie doesn’t approve of his niece’s courtship with him. His obsession/jealousy spins out of control after Rudolpho asks Catherine for his hand in marriage, leading to tragic consequences. The great Red Hook dialogue, all the relationships, the aspects about immigration, the investigation of masculinity, all these things make it a great play, an American tragedy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    "Just remember kid, you can quicker get back a million dollars that was stole than a word that you gave away." ....A lawyer narrates and advises characters in this tragic classic play of the 1950's set in a tenement not far from the Brooklyn Bridge.....All is well with longshoreman Uncle Eddie, kind-hearted Aunt Beatrice and live-in niece Catherine....until the secret guests from Italy arrive and Uncle Eddie turns from generous and welcoming to jealous, difficult and self-serving resulting in di "Just remember kid, you can quicker get back a million dollars that was stole than a word that you gave away." ....A lawyer narrates and advises characters in this tragic classic play of the 1950's set in a tenement not far from the Brooklyn Bridge.....All is well with longshoreman Uncle Eddie, kind-hearted Aunt Beatrice and live-in niece Catherine....until the secret guests from Italy arrive and Uncle Eddie turns from generous and welcoming to jealous, difficult and self-serving resulting in disastrous encounters and dark consequences.....Much intensity among intriguing characters! (Was unaware Miller was married to Marilyn Monroe for 5 years)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hend

    Although I didn’t agree with all that Eddie has done but I cant help loving his kindness and generosity with Catherine the daughter of his wife's sister that he adopted after she died his fault was that he loved Catherine so much. He says, "I took out of my own mouth to give to her.,I walked hungry plenty days in this city!" he gave a warm welcome to his wife's Italian cousins(Marco and Rodolpho) when they first arrived. He opened his doors to them,and declared that it was an "honor" to have them a Although I didn’t agree with all that Eddie has done but I cant help loving his kindness and generosity with Catherine the daughter of his wife's sister that he adopted after she died his fault was that he loved Catherine so much. He says, "I took out of my own mouth to give to her.,I walked hungry plenty days in this city!" he gave a warm welcome to his wife's Italian cousins(Marco and Rodolpho) when they first arrived. He opened his doors to them,and declared that it was an "honor" to have them at the house . They are both very gracious for the hospitality. Marco tells Eddie that he has three children and a wife back home that he will be sending money to..... Rodolpho, the young blonde brother, has no family and intends to stay in the country as long as possible... Eddie thinks that Rodolpho is untrustworthy... Eddie becomes jealous of the time he spends with Catherine he was looking for an excuse not to like him he supposes that Rodolfo is gay. the way he sing and dance, the fact that he can sew and cook....! Eddie tells Catherine that Rodolpho just wants to marry her to become a citizen..... For me this play raises a question, Why someone would be generous?is it something he cant control,he is born to be so And is happy that he helped others and need nothing from them… Or is it because he can be proud that he has done good.and expecting other to appreciate it,would this person still be generous, when he wanna all the time hear how much those others are grateful for what he had done…. And in return obey his orders even if they are not convinced… A symbolic action… Marco challenges Eddie to lift a chair by one its legs with only one of his arms. Eddie can't do it. Was this Marco's warning to Eddie? Was it a promise of violence, which Marco later Did…?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06h93s1 Description: Martin Jarvis directs Arthur Miller's 1955 award-winning masterpiece. Recorded specially in the US for Drama On 3. Alfred Molina leads an all-star American cast. Universal themes of family, guilt, loyalty, sexual attraction, jealousy - and love - in a powerful story about illegal immigration that still resonates to our time 60 years later. Miller's finest play. Italian-American neighbourhood near the Brooklyn Bridge, New York. 1950s. Lawyer Alfi http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06h93s1 Description: Martin Jarvis directs Arthur Miller's 1955 award-winning masterpiece. Recorded specially in the US for Drama On 3. Alfred Molina leads an all-star American cast. Universal themes of family, guilt, loyalty, sexual attraction, jealousy - and love - in a powerful story about illegal immigration that still resonates to our time 60 years later. Miller's finest play. Italian-American neighbourhood near the Brooklyn Bridge, New York. 1950s. Lawyer Alfieri (our narrator) confides to listeners there are cases where he can only watch as they run their bloody course. Longshoreman Eddie Carbone lives with his wife Beatrice and her orphaned niece, Catherine, in a Brooklyn tenement. He has a love of, almost an obsession with, 17 year old Catherine. Beatrice's Italian cousins are being smuggled into the country. The family hide the illegal immigrants, Marco and Rodolpho, while they work on the docks. Eddie's increasing suspicion and jealousy of Rodolpho's developing relationship with Catherine ('he ain't right, he cooks, he sings, he makes dresses') eventually leads to betrayal and a tragic confrontation. Daniel Just as we are nearing the end of these centenary celebrations hosted by Auntie, an flister points in the direction of Miller's insincerity and lines that just two days ago I would have looked on as strengthening, I now see as pieces of pissed-in Pampers posited on pathway in patters of precipitation. "My oh my!" you are muttering among yourselves, "Bettie has lost the plot with that pained passage of P's." The paradigm has shifted, that's what has happened, all those deep lines, the panoply he gave us, has paled into papery insignificance. Miller made a pretty penny by playing the parenting card. "Most people ain't People," says Eddie Carbone. Daniel Eddie Carbone Alfred Molina Alfieri Hector Elizondo Beatrice Carbone Jane Kaczmarek Catherine Melissa Benoist Marco Reid Scott Rodolpho Matthew Wolf Louis Andre Sogliuzzo Tony Andre Sogliuzzo First Immigration Officer Andre Sogliuzzo Mike Darren Richardson Second Immigration Officer Darren Richardson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    It was only while half the way through this that I realized that I had actually read this once before, whilst in school. I can remember detesting this after my first read as it felt like a pointless story that took the reader nowhere. My second read has unveiled so much that I missed the first time! Perhaps it was my lack of maturity, but I definitely did not appreciate the complexities that were packed into this short tale. The nuances of human emotion and the focus on the human condition are s It was only while half the way through this that I realized that I had actually read this once before, whilst in school. I can remember detesting this after my first read as it felt like a pointless story that took the reader nowhere. My second read has unveiled so much that I missed the first time! Perhaps it was my lack of maturity, but I definitely did not appreciate the complexities that were packed into this short tale. The nuances of human emotion and the focus on the human condition are so expertly and artfully dissected here that I can fully see why this has earned its status as a timeless classic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna Fhaumnuaypol

    I can't believe I just rated a school book read for academic purposes 5 stars. I first read it in class with my English teacher, I found it super boring and uninteresting. However, now that I have to revise it for my finals, I really took it seriously and read it in depth. I found out how this play fully captures me for the whole time reading and analyzing it. The characters, their struggles and problems are so easy to relate to. Eddie and his hard-working life as a longshoreman who is a tragic I can't believe I just rated a school book read for academic purposes 5 stars. I first read it in class with my English teacher, I found it super boring and uninteresting. However, now that I have to revise it for my finals, I really took it seriously and read it in depth. I found out how this play fully captures me for the whole time reading and analyzing it. The characters, their struggles and problems are so easy to relate to. Eddie and his hard-working life as a longshoreman who is a tragic hero who has developed so much as a character from the beginning of the play to the end, I think I have never seen such a big character development that is both obvious and subtle at the same time. I remember one amazing essay Miller wrote about Eddie that he is a 'Tragedy of a Common Man', Miller believes that 'the common man is as apt a subject for tragedy in its highest sense as kings were', and that it is not the fact that tragic heroes have been royal that makes them resonate with modern audience, it's the fact that they share the same problems as we do today, the same flaws fears and hopes. Alfieri, a witty lawyer who is like a chorus in a greek tragedy and who I personally admire his decision-making and reasons. Beatrice, a warm motherly housewife. Catherine, a rebellious young woman who is yet so innocent and naive when it comes to experiencing the real world. Rodolfo, a carefree blondie who sings, cooks and dances like a professional. Marco, the stereotypical Sicilian macho. Let's start from my favorite character Eddie. I found Eddie's character so complex yet so simple. He is just an ordinary hard-working longshoreman who has a lovely wife and a niece who he is protective of, but it's more than just that. There are his immoderate love for his niece, his action and other themes that revolve around. As I said, it's complex. I know people say that his immoderate love for Catherine is obviously romantic, but call me weird, I also find it sensibly fatherly. He has a point, when he realizes that it's not right that Rodolfo (an Italian immigrant who escapes from Sicily and stays in his house to work in the States) to from no-where takes Catherine (his niece) away from him (overlooking him because he's not her father and doesn't respect him by asking her out without his permission). I understand that she's not his, not a belonging, not a possession, she will one day has to go and he has to let her. But, she is so young (I know that seventeen back in the fifties is considered to be an adult already) and naive considering her lack of real-life experience. She can do way much better, and that's exactly what Eddie says. He says that if she has to go, then go. But don't end up marrying someone the same class as them as he 'struggles' so much to pay for her to finish high school and learn Stenography and to get a good job maybe in New York (a better neighborhood) but she still ends up working at a plumbing company in the same kind of neighborhood and about to get married to an illegal immigrant who may or may not (we still do not know for sure) be after her American Citizenship. It's complicated, isn't it? We, as readers, have so many different views with the plot and the complex characters. I love it. I can't believe I just said that. But I really love this play. My friends are going to laugh at me. But whatever. I admit that I love A View from the Bridge, a school book, read for academic purposes, that all of my friends are dying to get over with. I think it really is that type of book that leaves me thinking... about the characters, about what happened next, about the real meaning of everything. Whether Rodolfo really loves her, and does there marriage last? What happens to Marco after Eddie is killed? Does he get sent back or get imprisoned in the States while his family starve back in Italy? It's funny how I don't agree with everyone in my class that believes that Eddie is a homophobic and a creepy guy who loves his own niece. I found Eddie to be such an admirable character. He is a tragic figure. He is an ordinary man, who has ordinary flaws of letting go, of being selfish and greedy, who wants everything for himself. His actions within the play are completely motivated by his own desires, which yes is bad, because it is at the expense of others - it's selfish. However, humanity is selfish, we do things we want or like to do, it's a fact all of us can't deny. I cannot emphasize how much I love the last paragraph of the play in which Alfieri says: Most of the time we settle for half and I like it better. Even as I know how wrong he was, and his death useless, I tremble, for I confess that something perversely pure calls to me from his memory—not purely good, but himself purely And yet, it is better to settle for half, it must be! And so I mourn him—I admit it—with a certain....alarm. The paragraph is so simple. It is easy to understand yet it's so deep and meaningful. It sums up the whole play perfectly. It deals with the central conflict in A View from the Bridge, what is right and what is wrong morally and legally should be settled halfway. Being true to what you feel and fight for yourself, doing whatever you want and what's best for you without considering the expense of others, yes is quite admirable but to a certain limit; because people must act halfway to preserve the rules of community and the nature of law, you cannot go rob a bank to give it to the poor (like Robin Hood)because you think it's right morally to share the money to everyone because at the same time it's legally wrong. The same goes for this novel, Eddie's action is wrong morally and right legally. He 'snitches' on Marco and Rodolfo to The Immigration Bureau which he is doing the right thing following the law of the land but the wrong thing in terms of moral decency - betraying his own cousins. Irrationality is also how Alfieri defines acting wholly. The human animal becomes irrational when he acts fully on his instincts—just as Eddie does in the play. I agree that what he did, snitching on his own cousins was really bad and crossing the line. However, I also understand his desperation to keep Catherine with him and his anger resulting from his stubbornness to accept other people's opinion or reasons and his selfishness to let go. Miller tries to show readers to see that what Eddie does is wrong, loving his own niece and betraying his own cousin. I also heard that this point is linked to Miller's personal life, when he was called to testify in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee to name names of communist sympathizers during the McCarthy Era. Miller, like Eddie, was faced with the problem of choosing to be American or not, to choose whether to name names of people who were doing unlawful acts or to follow the rules of law. However, Miller who was loyal to his fellow artists refused to name names but like Eddie he went against the cultural consensus at the time. Miller, in the play, has changed the scene — rather than the mass culture supporting the extrication of possible communists, Miller chose to script a community that accepted and protected unlawful people. The consequences and eventual repercussions of naming names, for Eddie Carbone, are drastic. Miller used this play to strongly condemn the McCarthy trials and those who named the names of innocent artists. Therefore, I truly think Eddie is a good guy but who may have been carried away with his own feeling that he doesn't stop to look for a second how his actions affect others and himself. Nevertheless, if we look over the political aspect and into the familial perspective he reminds me of my father. He looks out for Catherine's sake, because he works hard to raise her into a young well-educated lady, she deserves better than a happy-go-lucky lad like Rodolfo. I have nothing against him, but in terms of marriage, Catherine should be more serious about what she's getting herself into and considering if he is good enough.. what's the rush? They practically go out for what? 6 months? I understand that she's trying to protect Rodolfo from getting 'snitched' and having to leave the States and her devastated and heartbroken. However, Rodolfo's lack of seriousness about life as a whole concerns Eddie, and I mean, whose parents wouldn't? Even if Eddie is not Catherine's father, but he is somewhat really similar, he raise her since she was young, he promised her mom to take care of Catherine on her deathbed, I mean there's a such strong connection between them that it's almost like father-daughter thing. Miller tries to make us think that Eddie loves Catherine more than just a niece, mentioning Eddie and Beatrice's sex life or lack thereof and making Beatrice looks like she feels the immoderate love and ultimately get jealous. I'm pretty sure if Beatrice is Catherine's real mother and Eddie is her real father; realistically, Beatrice should understand where Eddie's hate for Rodolfo is coming from and even go on his side. But, Miller attempts to mix up Beatrice's emotion and thought to spice up the play, he makes Beatrice a little jealous about her husband loving the niece too much, and make her acting all sad because they don't have sex at all for months. Sometimes in a play, I can feel that Beatrice does not really love Catherine that much, I can feel that she's trying to push Catherine away, persuading her that Catherine is a 'woman' now and can think for herself, and that she is not a 'baby' Eddie can control anymore. It's like her advice benefit her more (getting rid of Catherine and finally having Eddie to herself)than it benefits Catherine(to stand up for her rights). I personally think that parents would naturally look out for their child's sake right? And if the boy is no good they would come in and at least warn us? Like my father and mother would do that if they think whoever I love or going out with is not good enough, they will always come in and make it their business. Because actually, it is. They have the right to say whether they like the person we're going out to or not, whether their decision matters is another story. Another fact that I am sure Eddie does not love Catherine more than a daughter/niece is because at the end of the play, instead of him accepting Catherine apology, he completely ignores her and turns to Beatrice and says 'Oh B' and Beatrice answers him 'yes, yes'. It's like a reconciliation, a repair of their torn relationship. The last minute of Eddie's life, he is reminded of who actually matters most - his wife. Of all the people, Beatrice is the only person who never leaves him and who constantly get dominated by Eddie but still stays by his side. By her saying 'Yes, yes', it's like she forgives him of whatever he does her wrong and it is emotional indeed. I was so in to the play at that moment! Another point is that when Catherine asks him if she can work at the plumbing company and he is not happy about it because the company is in the same neighborhood; despite his protectiveness and despite the fact that he doesn't like the company, he stills lets her. There's a certain limit to his protectiveness. I think one of the most memorable stage direction Miller writes is somewhere here, I remember I read it and I can actually feel Eddie's emotion right out of the page. When Eddie sees Catherine's face after he denies to let her work at the plumbing company (this is one of the stage direction): 'After a moment of watching her face, Eddie breaks into a smile, but it almost seems that tears will form in his eyes' Personally, I found the stage direction beautiful. I know that one of the key to understand the play is to read the stage direction, I have to admit it, I have never really cared despite how many times my English teacher tells me to do so. Now I know how much it matters. It shows the complexity of the character's emotion. You could look at it and think both ways. Eddie is in love with this girl, why is he this emotional if he doesn't love her romantically and more than just a niece. Com'on people! He loves her. But not in a pedophile way. He loves her like a daughter. He reminds me of a father-figure, I mean think about it, of course there must be a connection, a bond, love and care in the relationship if you stay and live with someone for so long. For instance, like Katniss and Rue. They know each other in the arena for what how long? 2 days? I can't even remember. But I remember the connection, the bond between them. As Katniss, when Rue dies, she cries. It's perfectly simple. When you are so close with someone, when you live with them, of course there's a emotional attachment. You feel like you don't want to lose them, you don't want to let them go. I understand that for Eddie's circumstance, it's not like Catherine is going to die, but by letting her go do the job or even marrying Rodolfo, it's like pushing her away when he loves her so much (like a daughter!). Imagine yourself in his place, I'm pretty sure I'm going to be acting like Eddie. And oh my gosh. I nearly forgot to mention how much I love Alfieri. He is truly the best Greek Chrous ever. He is not only witty but straight-forward and clear. He is truly the so-called 'bridge' the title is referring. He was born in Italy but left since he was twenty five; therefore, he has one foot in Italy and another in America, the two culture's ideas of what's right or what's wrong are at war inside him. This makes the story interesting, when you can look at it two ways, and there are obvious reasons to prove either side of the story. It makes the argument more colorful and intriguing. Wow, I realize how carried away I am with this review, it is so long. I hope I'll do well on my English Literature paper and have this much to say!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anum

    Strange yet simple this story was not in the least amusing. I found it rather disturbing to be told the story of Eddie Carbone in such a manner, so I can only imagine the reaction I would have had if I had gone to the theatre to see it being enacted in front of my eyes. The appalling undertones in the play are the first thing I would like to draw attention to. Homosexuality is ridiculed, I agree. But more importantly feminity is explicitly laughed at through out, even discouraged. The fact that C Strange yet simple this story was not in the least amusing. I found it rather disturbing to be told the story of Eddie Carbone in such a manner, so I can only imagine the reaction I would have had if I had gone to the theatre to see it being enacted in front of my eyes. The appalling undertones in the play are the first thing I would like to draw attention to. Homosexuality is ridiculed, I agree. But more importantly feminity is explicitly laughed at through out, even discouraged. The fact that Catherine is not allowed to wear 'heals' is an important example. It is thought of as a lowly thing for a man to stoop down to the level of a woman. The way the longshoremen laugh at Rodolpho when Eddie talks to them about him, their 'snikering' especially, very clearly sheds light on this matter. The fact that Rodolpho has mastered the arts, which are generally associated with women by his society, make him an object of dishonourable insults, especially at the hands of Eddie. Another rather strange undertone that I came across was that of disregard following the very first encounter. Rodolpho is not acknowledged in the very beginning. All seem to nod for Eddie but none other than Rodolpho nods when he is introduced. The idea of mixed affection or rather confused affection is present throughout. Catherine is both flattered by and afraid of the closeness she shares with Eddie. The very idea that Catherine knows what is going on and yet she decides to let it go on, even sometimes unintentionally fuelling the already blazing fire in Eddie's heart, makes one wonder what game is the woman playing. The fact that she says that she meant no harm, shows that she didn't mean it but she does realise it clearly that she caused a lot of it herself. This is clear from Beatrice's words 'We all done it.' The idea of nonincestuous incest is also very unique. Catherine is not really Eddie's niece. Instead, she is Beatrice's niece. However, Arthur Miller plays ingeniously with the prejudice he knows the audiance will have against such a relationship. He uses it to build a case of this sort against Eddie. It is so amazing that even though one is fully aware that such a relationship, however wrong would not be incestual, still feels the right to blame Eddie of incestuous feelings. The characterisation is wonderfully achieved and I almost feel like applauding the playwright on the amazing job. However, I found the play a little too distressing without reason in places.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Palumbos

    Arthur Miller is worthy of worship.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TraceyL

    A good little family drama set in Brooklyn in the 1950's. It didn't blow me away but I did enjoy it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    A View from the Bridge, describes the upheaval in the home of Eddie Carbone, a career longshoreman who lives with his wife, Beatrice , and her niece, Catherine , who has just been offered a secretarial job when the play begins. Conflict arrives in the bodies of Marco and Rodolpho, Beatrice’s cousins, newly arrived from Italy. The pressure that has been building in the household - as Eddie jealously disapproves of Catherine hanging around the streets in heels and complains that her new skirt is t A View from the Bridge, describes the upheaval in the home of Eddie Carbone, a career longshoreman who lives with his wife, Beatrice , and her niece, Catherine , who has just been offered a secretarial job when the play begins. Conflict arrives in the bodies of Marco and Rodolpho, Beatrice’s cousins, newly arrived from Italy. The pressure that has been building in the household - as Eddie jealously disapproves of Catherine hanging around the streets in heels and complains that her new skirt is too short - only intensifies. Marco, who has come to America to send money to his wife and three hungry kids, is hardworking and respectful, so he and Eddie get along fine. But Rodolpho is blond and sings and dances and sews, and this makes Eddie uncomfortable, especially when Rodolpho fixes his attentions on Catherine. The connection Eddie and Catherine have is more affectionate than the one he has with his wife, who turns a blind eye to her husband’s obsessive interest in the girl. It is one of those plays in which the emotional currents run underneath dialogue as it happened in real life in an age where feelings could not be shown, when words died before being uttered because verbalizing things was too dangerous. A play about work, immigration, love, desire and defeat. One of those roads to doom you are happy to walk as long as you can come back to reality once you close the book or leave the theatre.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is still just...the best play. Trying to put my thoughts on it into words is essentially impossible, but I'll try anyway: to me, this is the text on American masculinity and violence, on the deep-seated effects of homo- and xenophobia, and of the necessity of an empathetic justice system. Seeing A View from the Bridge live is one of the greatest experiences of my life, one that I will hold onto for a long, long time, but the experience of reading the play, too, and digesting Miller's incisi This is still just...the best play. Trying to put my thoughts on it into words is essentially impossible, but I'll try anyway: to me, this is the text on American masculinity and violence, on the deep-seated effects of homo- and xenophobia, and of the necessity of an empathetic justice system. Seeing A View from the Bridge live is one of the greatest experiences of my life, one that I will hold onto for a long, long time, but the experience of reading the play, too, and digesting Miller's incisive stage directions, use of dialect, and the deep compassion he has for his flawed characters is one I savor as well. Sharing this play with my students has been such a gift.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    A terrifying and tragic play about family dynamics, immigration, law, and the denial of your own sins. I read and saw the play in 2010 when I was actually working on immigration law so I could relate to the aspect of how harsh the law is on both documented and undocumented immigrants. A terrifying and tragic play about family dynamics, immigration, law, and the denial of your own sins. I read and saw the play in 2010 when I was actually working on immigration law so I could relate to the aspect of how harsh the law is on both documented and undocumented immigrants.

  14. 4 out of 5

    tee

    eddie, (enveloping her with his eyes): i bless you and you don't talk to me. (he tries to smile.) only two acts but this play manages to drift through multiple arcs splendidly, being a very fine example of its craft which has left me with a lot to think about.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Deal

    A play about the struggle of letting go, and how bad that can go wrong.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Ying

    4.5 This is the second play I've read of Miller's. The first was The Crucible, which I loved. I went into A View from the Bridge with few expectations; I picked it randomly off a library shelf with no knowledge of what it was about or what others thought of it. Honestly, the name Arthur Miller was the only reason I chose to read it. I'm very glad I did. The setting of A View from the Bridge is entirely different from that of The Crucible. The latter, as most of you probably know, takes place in P 4.5 This is the second play I've read of Miller's. The first was The Crucible, which I loved. I went into A View from the Bridge with few expectations; I picked it randomly off a library shelf with no knowledge of what it was about or what others thought of it. Honestly, the name Arthur Miller was the only reason I chose to read it. I'm very glad I did. The setting of A View from the Bridge is entirely different from that of The Crucible. The latter, as most of you probably know, takes place in Puritan New England. I think its inevitable association with the Salem Witch Trials (which is so iconic a part of our national narrative that it's almost folkloric) lends it a half mystical, half historical feel. On a literal level, The Crucible is incredibly unrelatable but familiar because its story is one that we've all heard. A View from the Bridge, on the other hand, is set in twentieth century Brooklyn. It's a grittier landscape, perhaps more starkly realistic - but the underground world of immigrants is not something over which we marvel in history class. It tells an unfamiliar story, but it's easy to empathize because, I think, of the magnified family focus (as opposed to an entire society). This may seem like a weird analogy, but I picture/feel The Crucible as a cold, dusty, expansive operating room and A View From the Bridge as a tiny living room with a fireplace that burns a little too hot. Huge props to Miller for tailoring everything (dialect, tone, mood, etc.) to fit the setting and story. Some authors mold every situation to fit their own voice and worldview. Miller alters his outlook to fit the situation, so that all that exists on stage is the characters. No invisible playwright. I think this lends an elegance to his plays; drama's trademark short&sweetness pairs well with pure storytelling (as opposed to expounding). I also found A View From the Bridge to be a whole lot more morally ambiguous than The Crucible. This may have to do with the fact that the latter was written with a clear political objective, while the former was not. Regardless, I couldn't tell you which character I thought was "right." It's one of very few works I find completely impossible to take a stance (a "side") on; right and wrong are so inextricably linked in each character. Which brings me to my next point: characterization. I know I've spent the majority of this review pointing out the differences between The Crucible and A View From the Bridge, but at their cores, they are so wonderfully similar. There are some eerily similar lines ("I want my name, Marco."). Both are essentially observations of people and their psyches: their motivations, their fears, their thought processes, their biases, their hopes. In short, their values, and how they are either separable or inseparable from societal codes. Miller's works take truth, validity, and morality and ask how they should really be defined. Because when you throw the various human values (honor, tradition, obligation, love, etc.) into a pot, can you confidently pick out which are worth most? I cannot, and it's frustrating, but it's also spectacularly relieving to know that there's always some uncertainty, that there's always a maybe and a possibility and another side to the story. Edit: in all my waxing about similarities and differences, I neglected to mention some things. 1) On top of its character-studying, A View from the Bridge makes quite a bit of important commentary about the American Dream and what it really means. 1) I loved how generous Miller was with his stage directions; it made the play much easier to visualize. 3) I loved how subtly the story changed from the mundane/surface to the sacred/internal. 4) It's worth reading solely for lines like these: "Most of the time now we settle for half and I like it better. But the truth is holy, and even as I know how wrong he was...I tremble, for I confess that something perversely pure calls to me from his memory - not purely good, but himself purely, for he allowed himself to be wholly kown and for that I think I will love him more than all my sensible clients. And yet, it is better to settle for half, it must be!"

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tuti

    splendid

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    I was not ready for the ending and how much I related to the protagonist. It's a little creepy but in a sweet 'I've been brainwashed' kind of way. I was not ready for the ending and how much I related to the protagonist. It's a little creepy but in a sweet 'I've been brainwashed' kind of way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    Along with Of Mice And Men and King Lear, I was required to read A View From The Bridge for school so my views towards it were perhaps already a little tainted before I started it, as there were other books I would have preferred to have been reading. The play follows Eddie Carbone, a family man of Italian descent living in New York with his wife Beatrice and her niece, Catherine. When Beatrice's cousins, Marco and Rodolfo move in with them, seeking refuge as illegal immigrants, the problems are Along with Of Mice And Men and King Lear, I was required to read A View From The Bridge for school so my views towards it were perhaps already a little tainted before I started it, as there were other books I would have preferred to have been reading. The play follows Eddie Carbone, a family man of Italian descent living in New York with his wife Beatrice and her niece, Catherine. When Beatrice's cousins, Marco and Rodolfo move in with them, seeking refuge as illegal immigrants, the problems are only just beginning for their family. The situation gets increasingly worse as Catherine is attracted to Rodolfo, much to Eddie's displeasure. This play was clearly out of my comfort zone when it comes to books, but I was quite intrigued by the story. However for the majority of it, I found it to be boring and slow paced, and there were even times when nothing appeared to be happening which was very annoying. Eddie was a very irritating character. He spent most of the play looking out for his own interests, ignoring everyone else so it was easy to side against him in arguments. Although this was probably the intention of Miller, all it did was distance the reader from the story, which made it hard to care for anyone involved. No matter how annoying Eddie was, the character I disliked the most was Catherine. For the most part she acted like a child and I did not care about her at all. Beatrice was a bit of a pushover, so she was also difficult to like or to sympathise with. Marco and Rodolfo were okay, although there was nothing about them that really stood out. Alfieri, the narrator, was perhaps the only character that I actually liked in this play and I even enjoyed some of his speeches, although a few of them were unnecessarily long. As it is a play, one thing I generally expect are memorable moments or quotes which, if I'm honest, this was lacking. Looking back, I find it quite hard to remember what actually went on and there are no quotes that I can recall off the top of my head, which was very disappointing. If I was to describe this play, I would suggest that it was underwhelming. There was very little in it that stood out, not the characters, the language or the story itself. It was not a horrible play to read and watch, but it was just not very enjoyable. Rating - 2/5 ★★ There is also a link to this review on my blog here!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marlena Urban

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Arthur Miller's, A View from the Bridge, showed the real life circumstances where a teen growing up goes head to head with their guardian(s). I felt that this play was unique in the sense that it only took place in the living room. I liked this because it gives the audience a more of an in depth understanding of the situation involved with the main characters, and how the events unraveled. For example, it was more dramatic for the police to barge into the house than for the family to get called Arthur Miller's, A View from the Bridge, showed the real life circumstances where a teen growing up goes head to head with their guardian(s). I felt that this play was unique in the sense that it only took place in the living room. I liked this because it gives the audience a more of an in depth understanding of the situation involved with the main characters, and how the events unraveled. For example, it was more dramatic for the police to barge into the house than for the family to get called down to the station. I also enjoyed the ongoing theme showed throughout Miller's plays about identity and name continued here. Strict parenting, immigration, and family drama are all situations anyone can relate to; and it's amazing that a book written in the 50's can still be relevant in today's society. However, I also felt that this play in particular was too short and vague with their character development. I wish Marco and Rodolpho's backstories could have been more descriptive, as well as have had more screen time. Nonetheless, the play was unique to me because of the character's slang and word choice. Although A View from the Bridge stood out to me, it most likely won't be as rememberable to me as other plays produced by Miller, such as The Crucible.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chrystalla

    Arthur Miller is quickly becoming a favorite. Again, it is impossible to fully appreciate A View from the Bridge if you haven't seen it performed. After all, a play is written for that exact reason, to be performed. I watched a screening of A View from the Bridge performed at the Young Vic, directed by Ivo van Hove. My favorite thing about this play is the amazing character development. By the end of it, the characters have completely evolved into other people. The loss of innocence and trust is Arthur Miller is quickly becoming a favorite. Again, it is impossible to fully appreciate A View from the Bridge if you haven't seen it performed. After all, a play is written for that exact reason, to be performed. I watched a screening of A View from the Bridge performed at the Young Vic, directed by Ivo van Hove. My favorite thing about this play is the amazing character development. By the end of it, the characters have completely evolved into other people. The loss of innocence and trust is obvious. I read somewhere that it is meant to have the feel of an ancient Greek tragedy, and that is spot on. Another thing I like about Arthur Miller, is how he adapts the language to the place that the play is taking place. I realize that is essential for any playwright, but it is something I appreciate nonetheless.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    This play is my second dip into Arthur Miller (Death of a Salesman was naturally the first), and in both plays he has a wonderful way of melding the structure of a Greek play with the "everyman" in a modern-day setting. Alfieri, an attorney, is the narrator of this play and takes on the role of the Greek chorus, explaining to the audience/reader what is happening and giving a voice to moral and social mores of the time. And in true classic form, Alfieri ends the play by giving us a bit of advice This play is my second dip into Arthur Miller (Death of a Salesman was naturally the first), and in both plays he has a wonderful way of melding the structure of a Greek play with the "everyman" in a modern-day setting. Alfieri, an attorney, is the narrator of this play and takes on the role of the Greek chorus, explaining to the audience/reader what is happening and giving a voice to moral and social mores of the time. And in true classic form, Alfieri ends the play by giving us a bit of advice. (I partially disagree with this advice, but that's for another day.) I believe that this is where the title stems from: Alfieri has the view from the bridge; he takes the position of God in looking down on the action taking place. He is detached and, as narrator, invites us to take on that view of the action as well. The main character, Eddie Carbone, is cast in the mold of the tragic hero. He is certainly no king or general, but he is portrayed as a man no one could dislike; he's hard working, good to his family, and charitable. However, like the tragic heroes of the ancient Greeks and those carried forward by Shakespeare, Eddie does have a fatal flaw; he carries within him the potential for self destruction. (I don't consider that a spoiler. It's Arthur Miller, for god's sake! Of course everything is not going to be sweetness and light.) Inspired by the true story of a dockworker who informed on two illegal immigrants, this play's theme, at base, is one of discovery. This is demonstrated not just in the content but also in the form of the play itself. Like my man Chekhov, Miller tells his story and lets the readers or audience members decide--or discover--which characters deserve sympathy. Though Eddie is the tragic hero of the story, it is up to us to judge him; Miller doesn't tell us how we should feel. Also like Chekhov, Miller's method for accomplishing this is through understatement; he leaves it up to us to discover certain personality traits. He does this by merely giving us only a peek into particular actions rather than showing us the actual scene. In one particular instance, we aren't privy to seeing Eddie manhandle Rodolpho; we merely see the characters allude to it later when Eddie first talks to his wife, Beatrice, about it, and then later discusses it with Alfieri. This forces the audience to draw their own conclusions about what happened, to discover events right along with the other characters. Finally, is it just me, or does Miller's sense of desperation bring to mind this little gem: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DM_v3V... Thoughts?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Valentine

    ugh ew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Inez

    I started reading this play immediately after reading Pinter's The Birthday Party. Although they are different kettles of fish, both plays revolve around the arrival of two male outsiders into a domestic setting and the tragic events which follow. Although I really enjoyed the Pinter, my one gripe was how the young female character Lulu is not at all complex. She seems to exist solely to illustrate the men's cruelty. I was hoping the same wouldn't be true of the character Catherine in this play. I started reading this play immediately after reading Pinter's The Birthday Party. Although they are different kettles of fish, both plays revolve around the arrival of two male outsiders into a domestic setting and the tragic events which follow. Although I really enjoyed the Pinter, my one gripe was how the young female character Lulu is not at all complex. She seems to exist solely to illustrate the men's cruelty. I was hoping the same wouldn't be true of the character Catherine in this play. Even though in the first act she can do little other than make coffee for the men, by the second act I was relieved and absolutely riveted by the way she and the other characters evolve in the play. Having dealt with the immigration system in Britain and supported others as they navigate through it, this play really resonated with me. However, it wasn't the themes of belonging, borders and diaspora vs homeland that interested me the most. It was the human to human stuff: how Miller managed to make me hate and pity Eddie all at once and how people's intentions are often tunnel-visioned until it's too late. There are echoes of Greek drama and The Passion in there, as well as a dissection of masculinity and various types of prejudice. I'm a big fan of the film 'On the Waterfront' and was already aware of the interesting connections and differences between the film and this play. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theg... Despite their differences, both dramas seem to exist within the same universe and I found myself wondering whether perhaps Terry Malloy had once sparred with Eddie or Edie Doyle had been shopping with Catherine to buy those gloves. Flights of fancy, yes, but all courtesy of masterful characterisation.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Illiterate

    A tragedy of self-deception, love, letting go.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mared Owen

    (orginially 4.5*) What a tragedy- what a mess! Definitely looking forward to studying this in detail, because I feel like reading this once and rating it immediately doesn't do justice to this masterpiece. I know that I missed a lot reading it for the first time round so yes, as I said, a lot of potential for further study! 5* As I suspected, I'm enjoying studying this play more than actually reading it! edit 19.05.16: ha it's actually quite hilarious how obsessed I am with this play now. After se (orginially 4.5*) What a tragedy- what a mess! Definitely looking forward to studying this in detail, because I feel like reading this once and rating it immediately doesn't do justice to this masterpiece. I know that I missed a lot reading it for the first time round so yes, as I said, a lot of potential for further study! 5* As I suspected, I'm enjoying studying this play more than actually reading it! edit 19.05.16: ha it's actually quite hilarious how obsessed I am with this play now. After seeing the National Theatre Live recording of it from the West End starring Mark Strong et al, I have become so attached to this play. I can't artciulate my thoughts at the moment because I am so in awe...!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    Amazingly, I had never read, nor seen a production of, this play before now, although I knew the basic outlines of the plot. The impetus behind my catching up was all the hoopla over the current van Hove production, which made me interested in seeing what I'd missed. It's a pretty standard 50's melodrama, although the characters are all sharply etched, and the specifics (unconscious incest/homosexuality) must have seemed somewhat shocking for the time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tomas

    This was a play I have to study for my GCSE English course, which include lots of good literature. I have never before read a play by Miller, nor read a play where I have been uncomfortable throughout my reading experience. I hated absolutely all the characters, excluding Alfieri, which I won't go into now. They all had it coming from them. That is, briefly, why I loved it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    Miller manages to cover immigration, legal theory, sexual obsession, culture clash, homosexual baiting, and marital discord powerfully and subtlety simultaneously. The emotions run high, but the words run over the surface of much deeper conflicts. Masterful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Potatro Tatro

    Avoid it like ITV2 avoids making good television

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