counter create hit God, Medicine, and Suffering - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

God, Medicine, and Suffering

Availability: Ready to download

Why does a good and all-powerful God allow us to experience pain and suffering? According to Stanley Hauerwas, asking this question is a theological mistake. Drawing heavily on stories of ill and dying children to illustrate and clarify his discussion of theological-philosophical issues, Hauerwas explores why we so fervently seek explanations for suffering and evil, and he Why does a good and all-powerful God allow us to experience pain and suffering? According to Stanley Hauerwas, asking this question is a theological mistake. Drawing heavily on stories of ill and dying children to illustrate and clarify his discussion of theological-philosophical issues, Hauerwas explores why we so fervently seek explanations for suffering and evil, and he shows how modern medicine has become a god to which we look (in vain) for deliverance from the evils of disease and mortality.


Compare

Why does a good and all-powerful God allow us to experience pain and suffering? According to Stanley Hauerwas, asking this question is a theological mistake. Drawing heavily on stories of ill and dying children to illustrate and clarify his discussion of theological-philosophical issues, Hauerwas explores why we so fervently seek explanations for suffering and evil, and he Why does a good and all-powerful God allow us to experience pain and suffering? According to Stanley Hauerwas, asking this question is a theological mistake. Drawing heavily on stories of ill and dying children to illustrate and clarify his discussion of theological-philosophical issues, Hauerwas explores why we so fervently seek explanations for suffering and evil, and he shows how modern medicine has become a god to which we look (in vain) for deliverance from the evils of disease and mortality.

30 review for God, Medicine, and Suffering

  1. 5 out of 5

    Austin Storm

    This book feels a bit like it was born as an academic paper, but like all of Hauerwas' books it is as human as it is scholarly. The book walks through three other books, summarizing them extensively. The first chapter covers Peter DeVries' "The Blood of the Lamb". The second chapter looks at "Where is God When a Child Suffers?" by Penny Giesbrecht, and the third chapter covers the incredible anthropological work "The Private Worlds of Dying Children". I was only familiar with the third book, but This book feels a bit like it was born as an academic paper, but like all of Hauerwas' books it is as human as it is scholarly. The book walks through three other books, summarizing them extensively. The first chapter covers Peter DeVries' "The Blood of the Lamb". The second chapter looks at "Where is God When a Child Suffers?" by Penny Giesbrecht, and the third chapter covers the incredible anthropological work "The Private Worlds of Dying Children". I was only familiar with the third book, but the three stories forward the "argument" of the book very well. Hauerwas argues against theodicy as a theoretical enterprise, and passingly destroys "When Bad Things Happen to Good People". The book compellingly argues that "it is only as we are able to locate our lives in relation to those lives which manifest God's glory that we are graced with the resources necessary to live with our silences."

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    I'm overdue for a reread of this short, well-written trio of essays. Hauerwas overturns 1st-world expectations that modern medicine will be godlike in its ability to hold back death and relieve suffering. He argues that holding drugs, devices, and doctors to a divine standard, while limiting recognition of divine activity to medical intervention, means missing out on the good work both are really doing. I'm overdue for a reread of this short, well-written trio of essays. Hauerwas overturns 1st-world expectations that modern medicine will be godlike in its ability to hold back death and relieve suffering. He argues that holding drugs, devices, and doctors to a divine standard, while limiting recognition of divine activity to medical intervention, means missing out on the good work both are really doing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    The great Stanley Hauerwas argues here that 1) theodicy isn't really a problem. It's a problem for philosophical deism but not for the Christian narrative. 2) There is no answer or explanation for innocent suffering. Beyond that he poses critical questions about the suffering of children and the role of medicine in today's society. Some might be frustrated by Hauerwas' lack of answers or firm directives other than calling the church to lament and be fellow sufferers. (Note: he doesn't think we sh The great Stanley Hauerwas argues here that 1) theodicy isn't really a problem. It's a problem for philosophical deism but not for the Christian narrative. 2) There is no answer or explanation for innocent suffering. Beyond that he poses critical questions about the suffering of children and the role of medicine in today's society. Some might be frustrated by Hauerwas' lack of answers or firm directives other than calling the church to lament and be fellow sufferers. (Note: he doesn't think we should be passive victims to suffering either. There is a place for healing.) I believe that in this regard Hauerwas is correct. Biblically speaking there aren't such things as theodicies because suffering isn't actually a problem. Instead there is lament. There is mutual care and support. There is a God who loves. As a short and extremely well-written thick look at these topics I recommend this for anyone questions concerning sickness and suffering.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lyndon

    "Our medical technologies have outrun the spiritual resources of our society, which lacks all sense of how life might properly end." (p. 123). In this brief yet challenging work, Hauerwas asks of modern medicine, Modernity and the suffering: what does the way we suffer and die tells us about ourselves and our society? There is no 'reason' given; instead, the place of narrative, of caring, and of God's provision is explored. "Our medical technologies have outrun the spiritual resources of our society, which lacks all sense of how life might properly end." (p. 123). In this brief yet challenging work, Hauerwas asks of modern medicine, Modernity and the suffering: what does the way we suffer and die tells us about ourselves and our society? There is no 'reason' given; instead, the place of narrative, of caring, and of God's provision is explored.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Raghu

    Great book - explores the relationship between current medical practice in alleviating patient suffering and Christian ethics.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Bedard

    This was a challenging but rewarding book to read. Hauerwas questions the quest to understand how a powerful and loving God can allow suffering. He argues that is an enlightenment question and that it looks to the God of the philosophers more than the God of the Bible. He argues more for a trusting in God and a focus on the suffering Christ. The second part of the book looks at the way people (not just Christians) rely on medicine. He notes that people are more interested in cure than care. It in This was a challenging but rewarding book to read. Hauerwas questions the quest to understand how a powerful and loving God can allow suffering. He argues that is an enlightenment question and that it looks to the God of the philosophers more than the God of the Bible. He argues more for a trusting in God and a focus on the suffering Christ. The second part of the book looks at the way people (not just Christians) rely on medicine. He notes that people are more interested in cure than care. It includes a moving section on children dying of leukemia. I recommend this book for anyone interested in the problem of suffering.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    In form, a book that seems to have emerged from several academic papers and considerable attention to three other works: Peter DeVries' "The Blood of the Lamb," Penny Giesbrecht's "Where is God When a Child Suffers?," and Myra Bluebond-Langner's "The Private Worlds of Dying Children." Hauerwas spends much more time summarizing, analyzing, and considering the arguments of these other authors than he does advancing his own ideas about the topics. Still, a rich, valuable, and considered discussion In form, a book that seems to have emerged from several academic papers and considerable attention to three other works: Peter DeVries' "The Blood of the Lamb," Penny Giesbrecht's "Where is God When a Child Suffers?," and Myra Bluebond-Langner's "The Private Worlds of Dying Children." Hauerwas spends much more time summarizing, analyzing, and considering the arguments of these other authors than he does advancing his own ideas about the topics. Still, a rich, valuable, and considered discussion of modern medicine and individuals--especially children--in relation to death, dying, suffering, and pain.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cody Spencer

    While not presenting any clear solutions, Hauerwas raises some good questions about suffering and theodicy. I especially appreciate how he crafts the message around stories, since that is ultimately where we find meaning - he thus illustrates part of the solution by his manner of writing (so clever)!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caleb M

    This is a powerful and helpful little book. Whether you are in the medical community or not, you will face suffering and health issues so this is applicable well beyond the medical field. Highly recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Really thought provoking opinion on theodicy and suffering in the world. Very sad book, but worthwhile to read in order to understand suffering as well as reacting to other's grief. Really thought provoking opinion on theodicy and suffering in the world. Very sad book, but worthwhile to read in order to understand suffering as well as reacting to other's grief.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Honest assessment of grief, especially when a child is lost. Weaving together novels and theology, Hauerwas speaks to suffering and how it impacts our relationship with God.

  12. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnn

    This is a challenging book to understand and see the viewpoint as it is not a typical look at pain, suffering and death. It does not ask question, "Why does God allow suffering?", but rather he argues on "theological grounds against the very idea of theodicy as a theoretical enterprise and then concentrates on how medicine as an activity of service becomes distorted when we try to use it to eliminate the silence created by death." Early Christians didn't see their suffering as a point on which t This is a challenging book to understand and see the viewpoint as it is not a typical look at pain, suffering and death. It does not ask question, "Why does God allow suffering?", but rather he argues on "theological grounds against the very idea of theodicy as a theoretical enterprise and then concentrates on how medicine as an activity of service becomes distorted when we try to use it to eliminate the silence created by death." Early Christians didn't see their suffering as a point on which to ask, "God why would you allow this to happen?" but they saw it as an opportunity to live more faithful in their walk with Christ, It wasn't a "metaphysical problem needing a solution rather it was a practical challenge requiring a communal response." He has a lot of interesting points regarding our society's view of medicine and finding cures, delaying death, even at the cost of a lower quality of life, however much longer we can extend it. Is there a limit to medicine? Should our society consider a limit? "Our medical technologies have outrun the spiritual resources of our society, which lacks all sense of how life might properly end." Should be a good book to discuss at bookclub, especially among our medical community of the Mayo Clinic.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Seifert

    Naming the silences is an attempt to name what is too often denied, death and suffering. Hauerwas frames death and suffering in our society as being held captive to medical technologies "which have outrun the spiritual resources of our society, which lacks all sense of how life might properly end." Hauerwas uses the language of narrative 'to remind us that there is no "solution" to the problem of "setting limits" to medicine as long as the primary presumptions of liberalism are accepted'(that ou Naming the silences is an attempt to name what is too often denied, death and suffering. Hauerwas frames death and suffering in our society as being held captive to medical technologies "which have outrun the spiritual resources of our society, which lacks all sense of how life might properly end." Hauerwas uses the language of narrative 'to remind us that there is no "solution" to the problem of "setting limits" to medicine as long as the primary presumptions of liberalism are accepted'(that our lives are ours to do with what we will within our ‘natural” limits) in respect to a “natural life span” and a “tolerable death”. He reminds the Christian community that our lives are narratively determined and "that insofar as we live, we more nearly discover rather that create our lives." Naming the Silences provides an important advantage of reminding us that "our lives and our deaths are not occasional bits of unconnected behavior but part of a larger pattern; recognizing this gives purpose to our lives. When such a pattern is thought to be missing, death and illness cannot help but seem pointless and meaningless. As a result, illness and death can be seen only as something to deny."

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Le

    After reading this book and getting a chance to converse in depth with the author about his book, I have decided to write a book review. As the chief expert on postliberal theology, Hauerwas does an excellent job of giving us a historical view of medicine in the context of the Enlightenment where Francis Bacon's view of science begins taking hold of the long-respected tradition of medicine. By providing insightful anecdotes and stories that leaves us helpless before approaching the theodicy that After reading this book and getting a chance to converse in depth with the author about his book, I have decided to write a book review. As the chief expert on postliberal theology, Hauerwas does an excellent job of giving us a historical view of medicine in the context of the Enlightenment where Francis Bacon's view of science begins taking hold of the long-respected tradition of medicine. By providing insightful anecdotes and stories that leaves us helpless before approaching the theodicy that is inherent in the field of medicine, Hauerwas calls us to reconsider the ends of medicine within the context of a Christian traditions. This book has profoundly made me more aware of the damage that modernity has done to the practice of medicine. For anyone that think that medicine has at least a small amount of sacredness to it, should consider reading this short book as it offers a alternative to the technical profession of medicine that involves the profession of medicine grounded in a community that silently bears the suffering involved with death, injury, and disease.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Kohler

    Super interesting exploration of suffering, especially focusing on the suffering and death of children. Like much of his work, Hauerwas is here doing explorations rather than coming to hard conclusions. He wants to raise questions about the ends of medicine and the presuppositions about our lives (which he thinks attain greatest meaning when they are understood to have a narrative shape) as he explores how Christians are to understand our own suffering and the suffering of those around us.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    Thoughtful theological book relevant for anyone working with those with significant disease burden, loss, bereavement. Writer uses case study of child's death, so often troubling for religious people as well as those without religion. I was persuaded by his argument and have ordered Hauerwas book on mental illness. Thoughtful theological book relevant for anyone working with those with significant disease burden, loss, bereavement. Writer uses case study of child's death, so often troubling for religious people as well as those without religion. I was persuaded by his argument and have ordered Hauerwas book on mental illness.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This is a book, probably, best read in a season without a major crisis, and not one for finding comfort or guidance in anticipation of or after one. Outside of that, this is one of the most satisfying discussions I've come across regarding human suffering and where it intersects with God, our humanity, and our medical practices. This is a book, probably, best read in a season without a major crisis, and not one for finding comfort or guidance in anticipation of or after one. Outside of that, this is one of the most satisfying discussions I've come across regarding human suffering and where it intersects with God, our humanity, and our medical practices.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    full review to come.. this definitely should have been on the required reading list of Christian Ethics. Most thought provoking and helpful book in continuing reflection on the topic of suffering, and pastoral care I've encountered. full review to come.. this definitely should have been on the required reading list of Christian Ethics. Most thought provoking and helpful book in continuing reflection on the topic of suffering, and pastoral care I've encountered.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Meeks

    Not the first time through. Won't be the last. A great piece of work that tries to help us make sense of suffering without resolving The so-called problem of evil. A book for suffers and those who desire to learn how to suffer well and suffer along side. Not the first time through. Won't be the last. A great piece of work that tries to help us make sense of suffering without resolving The so-called problem of evil. A book for suffers and those who desire to learn how to suffer well and suffer along side.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    A tough read, but very interesting and heart-breaking. The last chapter is worth twice as much as the rest of the book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Ha

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vijay Pillai

  24. 5 out of 5

    Drew

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wes Durrwachter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 4 out of 5

    Logan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mcneil

  29. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brad East

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.