counter create hit Where Vultures Feast: Shell, Human Rights, and Oil - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Where Vultures Feast: Shell, Human Rights, and Oil

Availability: Ready to download

On February 22, 1895, a naval force laid siege to Brass, the chief city of the Ijo people of Nembe in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. After severe fighting, the city was razed. More than two thousand people perished in the attack. A hundred years later, the world was shocked by the murder of Ken Saro-Wiwa—writer, political activist, and leader of the Movement for the Survival of the On February 22, 1895, a naval force laid siege to Brass, the chief city of the Ijo people of Nembe in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. After severe fighting, the city was razed. More than two thousand people perished in the attack. A hundred years later, the world was shocked by the murder of Ken Saro-Wiwa—writer, political activist, and leader of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People. Again the people of Nembe were locked in a grim life-and-death struggle to safeguard their livelihood from two forces: a series of corrupt and repressive Nigerian governments and the giant multinational Royal Dutch Shell. Ike Okonta and Oronto Douglas present a devastating case against the world’s largest oil company, demonstrating how (in contrast to Shell’s public profile) irresponsible practices have degraded agricultural land and left a people destitute. The plunder of the Niger Delta has turned full circle as crude oil has taken the place of palm oil, but the dramatis personae remain the same: a powerful multinational company bent on extracting the last drop of blood from the richly endowed Niger Delta, and a courageous people determined to resist.


Compare

On February 22, 1895, a naval force laid siege to Brass, the chief city of the Ijo people of Nembe in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. After severe fighting, the city was razed. More than two thousand people perished in the attack. A hundred years later, the world was shocked by the murder of Ken Saro-Wiwa—writer, political activist, and leader of the Movement for the Survival of the On February 22, 1895, a naval force laid siege to Brass, the chief city of the Ijo people of Nembe in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. After severe fighting, the city was razed. More than two thousand people perished in the attack. A hundred years later, the world was shocked by the murder of Ken Saro-Wiwa—writer, political activist, and leader of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People. Again the people of Nembe were locked in a grim life-and-death struggle to safeguard their livelihood from two forces: a series of corrupt and repressive Nigerian governments and the giant multinational Royal Dutch Shell. Ike Okonta and Oronto Douglas present a devastating case against the world’s largest oil company, demonstrating how (in contrast to Shell’s public profile) irresponsible practices have degraded agricultural land and left a people destitute. The plunder of the Niger Delta has turned full circle as crude oil has taken the place of palm oil, but the dramatis personae remain the same: a powerful multinational company bent on extracting the last drop of blood from the richly endowed Niger Delta, and a courageous people determined to resist.

30 review for Where Vultures Feast: Shell, Human Rights, and Oil

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

    Fascinating (albeit terrible) subject, very poorly presented, and surprisingly self-righteous. On the other hand, if I had gone through what these authors' countrymen have gone through, I would be speechless. Fascinating (albeit terrible) subject, very poorly presented, and surprisingly self-righteous. On the other hand, if I had gone through what these authors' countrymen have gone through, I would be speechless.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Haumschild

    Informative, certainly, but relatively poorly constructed, edited, compiled. It seems obvious that the authors bit off more than they could chew in 350 pages and so the book reads a bit like free jazz at times. That said, one can glean a shocking view of the destructive capacities of oil extraction and refinement and the overall disgusting treatment of an entire population by both the Nigerian government and the corporate giant.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachael MacLean

    This book has a definite agenda, so if you like your history to not take sides I would not choose this book. That being said, I loved it and I thought it was both an incredibly well researched peice of scholarship and an amazing call to action.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allison Hipps

  6. 4 out of 5

    Saswat.S.Nayak

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sokari

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  9. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lrhhart

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  13. 5 out of 5

    julie

  14. 5 out of 5

    SpaceBear

  15. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shin Furuya

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe Joyce

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sindy N

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alice Byrnes

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danisara

  23. 4 out of 5

    Allyson Heissenbuttel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Wilson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mjneum

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  27. 5 out of 5

    celia a harrison

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike Mitchell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Szrot

  30. 4 out of 5

    Armani

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.