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After the betrayal at Isstvan, Horus begins his campaign against the Emperor, a galaxy-wide war that can lead only to Terra. But the road to the final confrontation between father and son is a long one – seven years filled with secrecy and silence, plans and foundations being formed across distant stars. An unknown history is about to be unveiled as light is shed on the da After the betrayal at Isstvan, Horus begins his campaign against the Emperor, a galaxy-wide war that can lead only to Terra. But the road to the final confrontation between father and son is a long one – seven years filled with secrecy and silence, plans and foundations being formed across distant stars. An unknown history is about to be unveiled as light is shed on the darkest years of the Horus Heresy, and revelations will surface that will shake the Imperium to its very foundation... Rules of Engagement - Graham McNeill https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Liar's Due - James Swallow https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Forgotten Sons - Nick Kyme https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Last Remembrancer - John French https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Rebirth - Chris Wraight https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Face of Treachery - Gav Thorpe https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Little Horus - Dan Abnett https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Iron Within - Rob Sanders https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Savage Weapons - Aaron Dembski-Bowden https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...


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After the betrayal at Isstvan, Horus begins his campaign against the Emperor, a galaxy-wide war that can lead only to Terra. But the road to the final confrontation between father and son is a long one – seven years filled with secrecy and silence, plans and foundations being formed across distant stars. An unknown history is about to be unveiled as light is shed on the da After the betrayal at Isstvan, Horus begins his campaign against the Emperor, a galaxy-wide war that can lead only to Terra. But the road to the final confrontation between father and son is a long one – seven years filled with secrecy and silence, plans and foundations being formed across distant stars. An unknown history is about to be unveiled as light is shed on the darkest years of the Horus Heresy, and revelations will surface that will shake the Imperium to its very foundation... Rules of Engagement - Graham McNeill https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Liar's Due - James Swallow https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Forgotten Sons - Nick Kyme https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Last Remembrancer - John French https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Rebirth - Chris Wraight https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Face of Treachery - Gav Thorpe https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Little Horus - Dan Abnett https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... The Iron Within - Rob Sanders https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Savage Weapons - Aaron Dembski-Bowden https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

30 review for Age of Darkness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris Berko

    Another great book of short stories offering glimpses of what the Heresy, now about two years in, has done to the universe. Every story was at least very good, as usual some were better than others, but there were no bad ones. Shit is now getting complex and there are a LOT of characters and names to keep track of but its all still coherent and clear and very very entertaining. Each author brings something different to the table and that's what is keeping this series and these books fresh and en Another great book of short stories offering glimpses of what the Heresy, now about two years in, has done to the universe. Every story was at least very good, as usual some were better than others, but there were no bad ones. Shit is now getting complex and there are a LOT of characters and names to keep track of but its all still coherent and clear and very very entertaining. Each author brings something different to the table and that's what is keeping this series and these books fresh and enjoyable. Very well done and thought out story line that reminds me of the Marvel Universe and what they did over there organically for the past ten-eleven years.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Some bad, others excellent. Worth it for the Iron Hands short story alone.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    A decent collection of short stories in the Warhammer 30k universe. Rather disjointed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Probably a 4.5 as a whole Rules of Engagement **** Interesting to see how the Great Work of Guilliman came about. Plus Remus is in it. Liar's Due ***** Not your knock down drag out Space Marine battle story. It showcases the subtle war of the Alpha Legion and the relationship of fathers to their sons and vice versa. Really enjoyed it. Forgotten Sons*** Not my favorite. Good idea, interesting storytelling. The Last Rememberancer **** Good to see some old characters show up again. Rebirth***** Thousa Probably a 4.5 as a whole Rules of Engagement **** Interesting to see how the Great Work of Guilliman came about. Plus Remus is in it. Liar's Due ***** Not your knock down drag out Space Marine battle story. It showcases the subtle war of the Alpha Legion and the relationship of fathers to their sons and vice versa. Really enjoyed it. Forgotten Sons*** Not my favorite. Good idea, interesting storytelling. The Last Rememberancer **** Good to see some old characters show up again. Rebirth***** Thousand Sons! I found myself wanting more and Wraight does a great job leading the reader so that the twist is a surprise. The Face of Treachery ***** Great story. Bit of a rehash but from a different perspective. Little Horus *** Wanted more. The Iron Within**** I liked it even though I am not an Iron Warriors fan. Savage Weapons ***** Dark Angels and Night Lords. Great story, great action.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hipsher

    Another well placed collection of short stories to remind the reader that there is a much bigger universe going by as you read each new book in the series. These short stories are full of minute details that will play much larger roles later and we even get several instance of Primarch interactions along the way. Some of the stories are less meaningful than others, but all in all, the stories are very good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maria Spalding

    Engaging read. Finally got to meet the Salamanders and Iron Warriors in a bit more depth.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    A bundle of short stories to fill in the blanks on what happened in the decades between the Istvaan V dropship massacre, and the conquest of Terra: - Rules of Engagement -- Graham McNeill: I'm not a fan of Ultramarines, and the story didn't bring anything new - Liar's Due -- James Swallow: very nice story on how small 'executions' can lead to a truly Galactic Conquest - Forgotten Sons -- Nick Kyme: also very nice, albeit not really contributing to the big story - The Last Remembrancer -- John French A bundle of short stories to fill in the blanks on what happened in the decades between the Istvaan V dropship massacre, and the conquest of Terra: - Rules of Engagement -- Graham McNeill: I'm not a fan of Ultramarines, and the story didn't bring anything new - Liar's Due -- James Swallow: very nice story on how small 'executions' can lead to a truly Galactic Conquest - Forgotten Sons -- Nick Kyme: also very nice, albeit not really contributing to the big story - The Last Remembrancer -- John French: I first heard the audiobook version. Very cool story, but a bit weak near the end - Rebirth -- Chris Wraight: Like a postscript on the Thousand Sons/Prospero Burns duology. Really nice - The Face of Threachery -- Gav Thorpe: A missing link between the 'Ravens Flight' audiobook and the upcoming 'Deliverance Lost' Horus Heresy tome. When I first saw it would be about the Raven Guard, I was a bit disappointed in advance, but now I can't wait for it - Little Horus -- Dan Abnett: A bit of insight in one of the supporting main characters. Nicely done, but I was a bit let down because I expected big revelations - The Iron Within -- Rob Sanders: A nice insight in how one of the traitor legions worked while they where still loyal, a bit gruesome once you realize how they're going to put it practice in their current state - Savage Weapons -- Aaron Dembski-Bowden: A bit more insight in the Lion'el Johnson case. The mystery is a bit wrapped up by this story (which is a pity), but hey, it also got Night Lords ! All in all I must admit I really expected more insight and more revelations about who is playing what role in the whole Horus Heresy. Also, a lot of blanks are not filled in. Nemesis (Warhammer 40,00) did a much better job there.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dominique "Eerie" Sobieska

    I own many books from The Horus Heresy but unfortunately Age of Darkness wasn't a hit for me. The writing was phenomenal but once I started short 3, I was truly bored. It felt repetitive even though they were written by different authors, with different characters and stories, it still felt the same in every way. The first story of an simulation was epic to say the least, the second story was long, and although I felt the pain of the characters, and the struggles of they came in contact with, it I own many books from The Horus Heresy but unfortunately Age of Darkness wasn't a hit for me. The writing was phenomenal but once I started short 3, I was truly bored. It felt repetitive even though they were written by different authors, with different characters and stories, it still felt the same in every way. The first story of an simulation was epic to say the least, the second story was long, and although I felt the pain of the characters, and the struggles of they came in contact with, it felt dragging. Afterwards, I don't particularly remember as my mind went blank. I definitely want to give this book a second shot but it may have to be in a few months or years, as it just wasn't the right time for me. Which is sad as the writing, structural narration, characters design and development (even for shorts) was truly enjoyable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gateacre

    This anthology doesn't push the overall plot forward; rather it is a series of vignettes set in the period between the drop site massacre and the invasion of Terra - or as it calls itself "the age of darkness". 1) Rules of Engagement (McNeill) gives further insight into the Ultramarines and makes a good points about doctrine and the role of the Primarchs. Nothing special but well written 3/5 2) Liar's Due (Swallow) is one of the most inventive and best written 40k short stories I've read. Swallow This anthology doesn't push the overall plot forward; rather it is a series of vignettes set in the period between the drop site massacre and the invasion of Terra - or as it calls itself "the age of darkness". 1) Rules of Engagement (McNeill) gives further insight into the Ultramarines and makes a good points about doctrine and the role of the Primarchs. Nothing special but well written 3/5 2) Liar's Due (Swallow) is one of the most inventive and best written 40k short stories I've read. Swallow really hits the nail on the head in the last few pages about who the real enemies behind the lines are. Brilliant stuff! 5/5 3) Forgotten Sons (Kyme) deals with what happens to those Marines 'left behind' during the Heresy either because of their injuries or loss of units. It also shows the ruthlessness of Horus in persuading colonies to join his forces. 3.5/5 4) The Last Remembrancer (French) is both touching and insightful, and brings together some interesting characters from earlier in the story arc. 4/5 5) Rebirth (Wraight) is a nicely written epilogue to the events on Prospero 3/5 6) Face of Treachery (Thorpe) presents a tale wrapping up some issues for the Raven Guard, with a pleasantly surprising ending 4/5 7) Little Horus (Abnett) cuts to the matter of everyone's favourite Mournival member 3.5/5 8) The Iron Within (Sanders) is the best story in the collection. Well written, strong on the issue of loyalty and with great battle scenes. Plus an unexpected ending 5+/5 9) Savage Weapons (Dembski-Bowden) is a a bit of fun Primarch-on-Primarch action 3/5 Overall, a great collection with no real duffers and a couple of gems.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Some very quality short stories that bring back characters and storylines that have been missed. Truly enjoyed this one!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Luc

    Horus' treachery is finally revealed, and The Emperor's glorious plans lie in ruins. The Age of Enlightenment is over, and the Age of Darkness has begun. These stories follow His legions as they take a shellacking across the galaxy. Rules of Engagement by Graham McNeill - Following the betrayal @ Calth, Guilliman slaves away on the Codex Astartes, and his Ultramarines struggle to incorporate it. Read this after Know No Fear. Liar's Due by James Swallow - Fear will keep the local systems in line. R Horus' treachery is finally revealed, and The Emperor's glorious plans lie in ruins. The Age of Enlightenment is over, and the Age of Darkness has begun. These stories follow His legions as they take a shellacking across the galaxy. Rules of Engagement by Graham McNeill - Following the betrayal @ Calth, Guilliman slaves away on the Codex Astartes, and his Ultramarines struggle to incorporate it. Read this after Know No Fear. Liar's Due by James Swallow - Fear will keep the local systems in line. Read after Legion. Forgotten Sons by Nick Kyme - OK, this Ultramarine is a stick in the mud. But still he serves. The Last Remembrancer by John French - We've been over this story to death, it feels like it's included in every anthology. I still feel betrayed by Iacton Qruze's and Rogal Dorn's willingness to bury the Imperial Truth. Read after Flight of the Eisenstein. Rebirth by Chris Wraight - A handful of Thousand Sons were sent away from Prospero before the night of the Wolf Wolves. A few return to their dead homeworld seeking answers. How could this have happened? These survivors fully expected the Wolf Wolves to leave behind a kill team to mop up stragglers, but... Read after the tragedy of the Thousand Sons. The Face of Treachery by Gav Thorpe - It's Gav Thorpe and spaceships, what more do you need? Read before Deliverance Lost. Little Horus by Dan Abnett - Horus Aximand, one quarter of the last Mournival, wants to recruit two members to replace Garviel Loken and Tarik Torgaddon. Read before Vengeful Spirit. The Iron Within by Rob Sanders - This one is hands down the best story in the book, even if Warsmith Barabas uses some, um, interesting language to describe his relationship to The Emperor. The cleverness with which a handful of Iron Warriors hold off an entire Iron Warriors great company is just so enjoyable! Read after Angel Exterminatus. Savage Weapons by Aaron Dembski-Bowden - Konrad Curze tries to deliver a warning to Lion El Johnson, but the Dark Angel misinterprets it. Read this before The Lion (short story in The Primarchs). o_O The biggest problem with any Black Library book is that we're always left wanting more more more. This book delivers, as only 2 of the stories are unrelated to other books, but that kinda makes it hard to read by itself. Still required reading for anyone following the Horus Heresy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Popovici

    A collection of short stories from various points in the course of the Heresy, mostly working as prequels to longer works. 1.Rules of Engagement Takes place after the Heresy, after Guilliman finished the Codex Astartes. The Ultramarines go through different battles testing the tactical and strategic value of the Codex. The Ultramarines are usually quite dull and this makes no exception. 2. Liar's Due A Alpha Legion agent infiltrates and sows dissent in a random backwater world. Predictable and dev A collection of short stories from various points in the course of the Heresy, mostly working as prequels to longer works. 1.Rules of Engagement Takes place after the Heresy, after Guilliman finished the Codex Astartes. The Ultramarines go through different battles testing the tactical and strategic value of the Codex. The Ultramarines are usually quite dull and this makes no exception. 2. Liar's Due A Alpha Legion agent infiltrates and sows dissent in a random backwater world. Predictable and devoid of any meaningful action, just serves as a pedestal for human stupidity. 3. Forgotten Sons A Ultramarine and a Iron Hand are sent as ambassadors (?!) to a heavy militarized world who has not declared allegiance to either the Loyalists or the Traitors and have organized a debate to settle the mater. Absurd concept with an equally flabbergasting conclusion. 4. The Last Remembrancer The greatest and most famous of the remembrancers is found in the Sol system aboard a Sons of Horus ship. Is interrogated by Dorn, who starts by denouncing the need for secrets and subterfuge, only to be promptly executed and the truth of his words burnt. The first short story that is actually quite good. 5. Rebirth A Thousand Sons squad lands on Prospero in search of answers. They are confronted by an unexpected foe. Serves as a prequel of sorts to Scars explaining how Revuel Arvida got where he got. Again a very good story full of both action and character moments. 6. The Face of Treachery A World Eaters ship hunts in the Istvaan system for surviving loyalists. Bamboozle ending courtesy of the Alpha Legion. Decent story, serves as a prequel for Deliverance Lost. 7. Little Horus Character study for Horus Aximand. Nothing really very exciting but sets up a future confrontation between Garviel Loken and Aximand. 8. The Iron Within Traitor Iron Warriors fight Loyalist Iron Warriors. Fun and filled with action and great moments. Serves as backstory for Warsmith Dantioch and explains how he ended up working with the Ultramarines. Very good. Maybe the best of the bunch. 9. Savage Weapons Lion El'Johnson and his Dark Angels vs Konrad Curze and his Night Lords. A cool fight but nothing really more. Overall a decent collection of stories which provides some background to other Horus Heresy books but at the end of the day nothing really special.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lester

    Short story anthologies are always a little difficult to review, as quality is usually a little uneven, so I'll rate each story individually. Even so, there was a lot to like here. The foreword and afterword's frame this as a collection of stories that are set during awkward middle point in the Heresy - this is the seven years where the bulk of the fighting occurs, sandwiched between Istvaan and the Siege of Terra. It's nice to finally be moving on from stories that deal with the beginning of th Short story anthologies are always a little difficult to review, as quality is usually a little uneven, so I'll rate each story individually. Even so, there was a lot to like here. The foreword and afterword's frame this as a collection of stories that are set during awkward middle point in the Heresy - this is the seven years where the bulk of the fighting occurs, sandwiched between Istvaan and the Siege of Terra. It's nice to finally be moving on from stories that deal with the beginning of the Heresy! 'X falls to Chaos' or 'Y discovers X has fallen to Chaos' was beginning to lose its novelty. Rules of Engagement - ***: It was enjoyable to see Guilliman starting his little empire and the development of one of the most defining texts within the fiction of Warhammer 40,000. However, it was a little too obvious what was really happening, so the twist fell somewhat flat. Liar's Due - *****: My favourite from the anthology. A tense and heart-breaking look at a town of largely ignorant imperial citizens being manipulated by outside forces. There's a couple of moments in this that had me wanting to scream 'Nooooooo!' at the poor sods. Forgotten Sons - ***: A pair of retired (due to injury, mental and physical) Space Marines go on a diplomatic mission that predictably, goes very wrong. Some excitement, and a good end, but the human counterbalance to these marines was killed off a little too quickly, leaving the rest without much heart. The Last Remembrancer - **: It was nice to see a survivor from the first trilogy of books again, but I left this feeling that not an awful lot had happened. Some nice philosophising about what's going to come after the Heresy, but it felt a bit too soon in the grand tale for all that pessimism from Rogal Dorn. Rebirth - ***: This felt somewhat off to me - a squad of Thousand Sons investigate the remains of Prospero, post burning of, but they don't seem terribly bothered by it! Worth it for the interrogation scenes, if nothing else but the marine on marine action isn't anything you won't have read before. The Face of Treachery - ****: If the action leading up to the fantastic last paragraph had been up to the same standard as that ending, this would have been a clear five stars. As it is it's a pretty enjoyable tale of the Raven Guard rescuing their Primarch whilst being hounded by World Eaters. And then the twist. So good. Little Horus - ***: Horus Aximund was never my favourite character and this doesn't really do much to elevate him in my estimation. However, I did really enjoy the action scenes against the planetary guard, who seemed an interesting lot before the Sons of Horus killed them all. The Iron Within - ***: Iron Warrior genius who isn't a traitor has a dramatic final stand against some other Iron Warriors who are. Basically just bolter porn but no less enjoyable for it. Savage Weapons - **: So frustrating! Not only does this seem to squarely place the Lion's loyalties, it also has all its most interesting moments off screen, finishing with a bizarrely dull Primarch vs Primarch fight. Not half as interesting and ambiguous as it was aiming for.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert McCarroll

    Being an anthology, I can speak on each of the constituent tales as I finish them. I will try not to let a lack of quality in one yarn sour me to the others. That first sour point is the opening story. "Rules of Engagement" where the Ultramarines go through training exercises to test out the strategms in the still in-progress Codex Astartes. They come off as extra-smurfy and unsympathetic in this story. By the end, I wanted to have the Captain of the 4th flogged for being a whiny emo fool. "Liar's Being an anthology, I can speak on each of the constituent tales as I finish them. I will try not to let a lack of quality in one yarn sour me to the others. That first sour point is the opening story. "Rules of Engagement" where the Ultramarines go through training exercises to test out the strategms in the still in-progress Codex Astartes. They come off as extra-smurfy and unsympathetic in this story. By the end, I wanted to have the Captain of the 4th flogged for being a whiny emo fool. "Liar's Due": Really? You named a character 'Mendax'? "Hello, my name is 'liar', what's yours?" The plot itself is a subpar retelling of "Monsters are Due on Maple Street", only without the elements that made 'Monsters' a classic replaced by a "Just as planned" rectal extraction by the Alpha Legion. Because we don't get to know the townsfolk and we don't see the breakdown and accusations leading into the violence, the story is substantially weaker than the original. The greatest Tragedy is that they wasted a superlative voice acting performance on such a weak tale. "Forgotton Sons": Apparently Space Marines do get PTSD - if you butcher their legion and possibly murder their primarch before their eyes. Two no longer combat capable Astartes are sent to negotiate the reaffirmation of a world's loyalty to the Golden Throne over the Warmaster because the cost of forcing compliance would bog down too many war assets that could be better used elsewhere. This leads to one of the better Heresey yarns I've seen, especially in comparison to some of the earlier entries in this anthology. "The Last Remembrancer": I'd read this one before in Hammer and Bolter. It didn't make much of an impression then, and even in context it whiffs. While technically competent, the main shortcoming is that it's a philosophical debate involving the titular Remembrancer, Rogal Dorn and the Half Heard (I can't spell his actual name). On the upside, it treats a primarch as a human being for once and on that aspect is superior to a vast swathe of other Heresey works. Your milage may vary if the work itself is any good. "Rebirth": Oh, that's what happened to the Thousand Sons fleet - why didn't you tell me during 'Thousand Sons'? It would only have taken a sentence to make it clear. Anyway, one of the scattered Thousand Sons ships returns to a burned Propspero and does very poorly against another force of Astartes there. This story is one of those that lends creedance to the Fan theory that the fleet elements of the Thousand Sons which did not get transported to the Planet of the Sorcerers would later found the Blood Ravens. The evidence is thin on the ground, but the sorry state of supply would explain that chapter's magpie tendencies. "The Face of Treachery": Felt like a misplaced chapter from another book. No beginning, no end, it just starts, then stops. I can't say it was bad, it just should have stayed a part of the book it was taken out of. "Little Horus": Can you utterly destroy the credibility of a villain in a single short story? Turns out you can. "Little Horus" goes out of it's way to demolish whatever threat Horus Aximand might have had within this series. It made a literal laughingstock of him. That was my reaction when the White Scar lopped his face off. Don't worry, that's not a spoiler, the story repeats the motif "But after they reattached his face, all he ever looked was..." By the end, when the audiobook was saying 'Invincible' I was saying out loud 'Pathetic'. Also, apparently humans from Dwell are made up entirely of hyper-pressureized blood, or are minitaure warp portals to blood demiplanes. There is no other way to explain the pool of blood deep enough for corpses to literally float on it. There simply is not enough blood in a real human for that to happen given the numbers and dispositions involved in the fight. EDIT- with all the other things I found laughable, I forgot to mention the author botched on the identity of the person stalking Aximand in his sleep. Unless Little Horus has become a Psyker, he would be more haunted by the person he actually carved up than the one whose death they decided to recton away. "Iron Within": This story gains special recognition because I'd read it somewhere else (probably Hammer and Bolter), remembered several different components quite vividly, but forgot they all came from the same place. If it didn't have the coda it would be better. It doesn't fit the tone of the ending, and it completely demolishes my goodwill for the story. I don't care what the morbid thoughts of a dying space marine are. "Savage Weapons": I'd barely started and already I was bored. It's Dark Angels against Night Lords, basically Traitors versus Renegades. And once again Aaron assumes the readers know about and care about these groups, so he hasn't tried to make us give a *bleep* based upon what happens in-story. I don't care about the Night Lords and I don't like the Dark Angels, so give me characters that don't make me wish for a premature 'Nid arrival. The story did pick up to merely mediocre when the faction I don't care about and the faction I don't like started killing each other. But, then he botched it. The story reached an organic and perfectly natural stopping point - then kept right on going. At that point I uttered a minced oath and shut it off. I have no idea how much of the story was left, and I really don't care. Of the lot, I recommend "Forgotten Sons" and "Iron Within" with a YMMV on "The Last Remembrancer" and a 'skip' for the rest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Angerico Cariño

    This book could've just passed as yet another collection of short stories that act as filler to the overarching Horus storyline. It could've flown under my radar had I not been stubborn enough to always read everything about the Heresy. And I would've given it a 3-star. But The Iron Within was a gem that pulled all the other stories' weight. It's the story of Dantioch, an almost-retired Iron Warrior still loyal to The Emperor, and how he performed an inspiring last stand against his traitor brot This book could've just passed as yet another collection of short stories that act as filler to the overarching Horus storyline. It could've flown under my radar had I not been stubborn enough to always read everything about the Heresy. And I would've given it a 3-star. But The Iron Within was a gem that pulled all the other stories' weight. It's the story of Dantioch, an almost-retired Iron Warrior still loyal to The Emperor, and how he performed an inspiring last stand against his traitor brothers. The Iron Warriors have always been renowned as masters of siegecraft, and Dantioch used this knowledge to defend his fortress and his honor.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Davis

    Normally I'm fond of short story collections for licensed fiction. Most of them are the quality you'd expect, but there's usually a handful of stories that stand above the rest by dint of being in interesting corners of the universe that wouldn't be able to sustain an entire novel. But this one was dogshit. It even had stories by some of the better Black Library authors (Abnett, McNeill, ADB) that were completely forgettable. The only story I'll remember in a week is Liar's Due by James Swallow, Normally I'm fond of short story collections for licensed fiction. Most of them are the quality you'd expect, but there's usually a handful of stories that stand above the rest by dint of being in interesting corners of the universe that wouldn't be able to sustain an entire novel. But this one was dogshit. It even had stories by some of the better Black Library authors (Abnett, McNeill, ADB) that were completely forgettable. The only story I'll remember in a week is Liar's Due by James Swallow, which is worth checking out. Skip this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Blank

    Probably my favorite short story collection of the HH (so far). The last two alone are worth buying the book for. “Iron Within,” along with the rest of his work, makes you wonder why Rob Sanders was never tapped to write a full novel for the Heresy. ADB of course brings the brutality with the first meeting of the Dark Angels and Night Lords on Tsalguasa. I’m basically going back and catching up on these collections now that I’m caught up on the paperback releases, and honestly I feel like I’m en Probably my favorite short story collection of the HH (so far). The last two alone are worth buying the book for. “Iron Within,” along with the rest of his work, makes you wonder why Rob Sanders was never tapped to write a full novel for the Heresy. ADB of course brings the brutality with the first meeting of the Dark Angels and Night Lords on Tsalguasa. I’m basically going back and catching up on these collections now that I’m caught up on the paperback releases, and honestly I feel like I’m enjoying them more for it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Victor Ward

    A weird downturn in the quality of the Horus Heresy stories, despite being written by the same authors. The start is an uninspiring story about the Codex Astartes that reads more like the kind of fluff you'd get in the margins of a source book. There are some ok stories after that, but many seem to just dully tick off the boxes to get the series to its next point. Its a pity, since its so close to several of the better books in the series but doesn't match their energy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    It's been a while since I finished this one (probably back in March), so I can't go into too great of detail here. I do remember it being another short story collection that starts on a weak note - calling your collection "Age of Darkness" and then having your first story be almost... silly? is an odd choice. Looking back at it, I think I liked about half of the stories quite a bit, and sort of disliked the other half, so... 3 stars it is!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Riches

    Some of the stories feel rushed, which is evident in numerous grammar and spelling errors. However, it was good to read some stories that link in with later books. My personal favourite waa the Iron Hands story. It was original, unique and a different perspective altogether. In some parts, quite touching.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Rules of Engagement by Graham McNeill - 1/5 Liar's Due by James Swallow - 1/5 Forgotten Sons by Nick Kyme - 3/5 The Last Remembrancer by John French - 2/5 Rebirth by Chris Wraight - 3/5 The Face of Treachery by Gav Thorpe - 4/5 Little Horus by Dan Abnett - 4/5 The Iron Within by Rob Sanders - 5/5 Savage Weapons by Aaron Dembski-Bowden - 3/5

  22. 5 out of 5

    LuisJ

    As one might suspect, this is a bunch of filler and not very good at that. The surprise of the bunch was the short story 'The Iron Within' by Rob Sanders which was easily the best of the bunch. In fact, I'll be keeping an eye-out for anything novel-length by him.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Edward Halliwell

    I tried to like this, but may not have been in the right frame of mind. Every story seemed to have a ridiculous twist towards the end, and although the action and pace kept the pages turning, the overall additions to lore and the grand epic of the heresy were minimal if none existent.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Richard Stuart

    Some decent stories in this collection. My stand outs were Liar's Due and The Iron Within.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Yuk

    Another great book in the Horus Heresy series. Collection of short stories. Favorite of the bunch - The Iron Within

  26. 5 out of 5

    Branislav Makan

    Really liked it. Shows fragments of what's going on with some legions that haven't been mentioned for a while or at all.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alasdair

    Man, this was rough until the last couple of stories swung for the fences and pulled it back into being ok.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shortsman

    Most of these stories are GREAT! Love it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessie B.

    An interesting collection

  30. 5 out of 5

    MontyJoe

    Naah... nothing interesting here.

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