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If you fear one thing in life, fear the djinn. This groundbreaking book presents the findings of Rosemary Ellen Guiley and Philip J. Imbrogno's investigation into the powerful and mysterious interdimensional beings known as djinn or genies. It reveals what the djinn are, where they can be found--and their hidden agenda against the human race. Working with material compiled If you fear one thing in life, fear the djinn. This groundbreaking book presents the findings of Rosemary Ellen Guiley and Philip J. Imbrogno's investigation into the powerful and mysterious interdimensional beings known as djinn or genies. It reveals what the djinn are, where they can be found--and their hidden agenda against the human race. Working with material compiled from a variety of sources--including their own case files, Middle Eastern lore, the Qur'an, teachings of Islamic scholars, and the latest theories in quantum physics--the authors explore the relationship between the djinn, demons, fairies, shadow people, and extraterrestrials. They discuss the military's interest in these clandestine beings, offer eyewitness accounts of modern human encounters with the djinn, and reveal the location of interdimensional entry points in North America.


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If you fear one thing in life, fear the djinn. This groundbreaking book presents the findings of Rosemary Ellen Guiley and Philip J. Imbrogno's investigation into the powerful and mysterious interdimensional beings known as djinn or genies. It reveals what the djinn are, where they can be found--and their hidden agenda against the human race. Working with material compiled If you fear one thing in life, fear the djinn. This groundbreaking book presents the findings of Rosemary Ellen Guiley and Philip J. Imbrogno's investigation into the powerful and mysterious interdimensional beings known as djinn or genies. It reveals what the djinn are, where they can be found--and their hidden agenda against the human race. Working with material compiled from a variety of sources--including their own case files, Middle Eastern lore, the Qur'an, teachings of Islamic scholars, and the latest theories in quantum physics--the authors explore the relationship between the djinn, demons, fairies, shadow people, and extraterrestrials. They discuss the military's interest in these clandestine beings, offer eyewitness accounts of modern human encounters with the djinn, and reveal the location of interdimensional entry points in North America.

30 review for The Vengeful Djinn: Unveiling the Hidden Agenda of Genies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    Debated on this one. Considered giving it two stars. If I could do half stars I would have given 2.5 I believe. A bit repetitive but there is still a lot of good information in this book about djinn and strange djinn encounters. Not my favorite book though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Owen Spencer

    Obviously, if you are skeptical about the supernatural and/or paranormal you will scoff at this book. But people who know better will find much to appreciate in The Vengeful Djinn. The main hypothesis of this book is that djinn are often (usually?) responsible for reported paranormal phenomena including ghosts, aliens/UFOs, fairies, poltergeists, etc. Most information about the djinn is located within the Qur'an and other Muslim sources. Consequently, this book includes a lot of information abou Obviously, if you are skeptical about the supernatural and/or paranormal you will scoff at this book. But people who know better will find much to appreciate in The Vengeful Djinn. The main hypothesis of this book is that djinn are often (usually?) responsible for reported paranormal phenomena including ghosts, aliens/UFOs, fairies, poltergeists, etc. Most information about the djinn is located within the Qur'an and other Muslim sources. Consequently, this book includes a lot of information about, and passages from, the Qur'an. But the authors also emphasize other religious and spiritual writings, including the Bible. They believe that the demons and devils spoken of in the Bible may (mostly) be djinn. The authors speculate quite a bit throughout the book, but they admit it when they do. I think these authors have it backwards. It seems to me that the djinn are comprised of various types of demons and devils (and not the other way around). Of course, it's a bit absurd to argue this way, because it all boils down to semantics. As a firm believer in the reality of malevolent spirits and their effects on humans, I was very pleased to read a book attempting (and succeeding) to shed light on these entities. I learned from this book a few really interesting facts about spirit entities that I didn't know before. I understand this topic better now. However, I definitely wouldn't recommend this book to more sensitive readers, because it contains some pretty disturbing information.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    I expected a little bit more. The book is good for someone totally brand new to the paranormal and Middle Eastern lore. If you are at the intermediate level you would find this every interesting. I liked and I did learn more as there is not a lot of material available on the Djinn. This book puts it out there, and I learned quite a bit from it. But let us say that I probably could learned as much listening to an Islamic expert on the Djinn in a five minute youtube video. The book does also have I expected a little bit more. The book is good for someone totally brand new to the paranormal and Middle Eastern lore. If you are at the intermediate level you would find this every interesting. I liked and I did learn more as there is not a lot of material available on the Djinn. This book puts it out there, and I learned quite a bit from it. But let us say that I probably could learned as much listening to an Islamic expert on the Djinn in a five minute youtube video. The book does also have a rich bibliography for future reading and research. The book starts out giving an Islamic history of the Djinnn and their relation to Allah and his angels. Before mankind was about perhaps millions of years before this planet was ruled by the Djinn and Iblis was their ruler. Now the Djinn could live for millions of years they do not have brief life spans like we do. None the less they were organized by clans and they built majectics kingdoms and they had a very grand society. They were also consumed with petty wars and these wars proved to be rather devastating. So Allah decided to make man out of clay. Now Iblis was good with the angels and Allah. Unlike most of the Djinn he chose to follow Allah. When Allah made man out of clay he told everybody to bow to it. Everyone did but Iblis. He was cast out of heaven. Never to return. He became head of all the Djinn once they were banished to another realm. We were given reign over the planet and the Djinn for the most part were banished. Djinn do not like people and that is putting it lightly. They seem to want their planet back. In the Middle East there are certain caves, lakes and desolate areas that are owned by certain Djinn or that certain Djinn live there. It is not safe for humans to go there. They will be spooked, attacked maybe even possessed. Djinn are very territorial in that respect. Best leave! Djinn vindictive. Since they are made of fire or plasma they can shape shift wuite easily. In the Middle East they can turn into black dogs or snakes. They also take the form of ghosts, deities or angels. They are tricksters. Philip Imbrogno tells of his episode in Oman when he enters a Djinn's cave. In thought that was great. He also mentions that the US army is trying to capture Djin as well. The authors do use stories to illustrate their point. However they tend to leave the cultural context of the discussion and end up talking about hauntings in the American heartland or pull example from native American folk lore. They should have stayed more into the Middle East and pulled their supporting stories from their. The comparison to faeries and other spirit folk was helpful as it gives the reader a broader frame of reference. We know that these spirit folk can shape shift, play tricks on humans and even mate with human. They have this in common with faerie folk from other traditions. It was good to learn about the Mothman, the Native American shadow people who show up on your wall and scare the lights out of you. But we need Middle Eastern Examples. Of course Middle Eastern folk are fearful of getting the attention of the Djinn. THey will not even mention them. Once the Djinn were banished King Solomon added further insult to injury by enslaving them and forcing them to help build his empire. he did this by using a ring with God's name on it. He forced the Djinn to build his great temple. After that he locked them up in Brass containers and threw them out to the sea. Djinn that have been imprisoned for so long are quite angry and while yes they will give the releaser three wishes they often work to one's detriment. Electromagnetic stuff is affecting our world. All this technology is opening portals that enable them to come though . but since their bodies are plasma it can also make them come apart. The book has some good banishing techniques and references to Western Ceremonial Magic when it comes to dealing with spirits. Bismillah stay safe.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Lots of new information to digest. A different point of view on so many things I thought I already knew. A good read and good for a critical mind to analyse for your own sake. Definitely good for raising awareness of the different entities from different dimensions that can disrupt our lives, and how to deal with them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hydra M. Star

    I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, it does offer an extensive overview of djinn folklore and history. On the other hand, Philip J. Imbrogno has been exposed for having told untruths regarding his educational and scientific background and the science and “evidence” presented to make the case for the real life existence of djinn in this book is laughable and this is before taking into consideration the authors’ unified theory of all things paranormal being djinn. Expect not ev I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, it does offer an extensive overview of djinn folklore and history. On the other hand, Philip J. Imbrogno has been exposed for having told untruths regarding his educational and scientific background and the science and “evidence” presented to make the case for the real life existence of djinn in this book is laughable and this is before taking into consideration the authors’ unified theory of all things paranormal being djinn. Expect not everything paranormal is caused by djinn, because fairies, aliens, demons, and everything else is quite possibly real as well. I can only think of two reasons why the authors would present such a wishy-washy theory. One, they want to write and continue to sale other books they have written about these other subjects and stating that all of it is djinn might present a problem for them. Or, two, they know their theory is crap. Now, let me say a few words more about this “evidence” of theirs. Most of what is stated as facts about djinn comes from folklore and Islamic religious text. That’s fine, if you’re just using these texts and stories to give the reader a background on the history of the belief in djinn, but in several areas of the book it seemed that the logic being used was, “Well, if the Prophet Mohammed or some other old Muslim said it then it must be true and it must be djinn.” Mixed in with this were a few modern day accounts of djinn activity. Many of these accounts came second or third hand. Many of them were reports of activity given by people who themselves did not believe they were dealing with a djinn, but who the authors, for various reasons, believed were. Nearly all of them sounded like crackpots or liars. Then there is the authors' personal experiences. Basically, they used the sort of equipment you’d seen on Ghost Hunters to talk to some djinn, who at first said they were demons but then after being asked again who they were said that they were djinn. Even if one is willing to believe that Guiley and Imbrogno were in direct contact with paranormal beings it’s pretty obvious they got the answer they wanted because it was the one they wanted. This wasn’t the only area of the book where it was obvious they were stretching to find the answers and evidence they wanted. How far they were willing to go to connect everything that even remotely seemed paranormal to djinn can best be show in the title of one of the book’s sub-chapters, “Did H.P. Lovecraft Know the Djinn?” It was implied in this section of the book that Cthulhu was a djinn and that he, or maybe other djinn, inspired Lovecraft’s fiction. Cthulhu was a djinn? One can only hope that they were joking, but I fear not. In closing, over all this book was a fun read, but shouldn’t be taken seriously.

  6. 5 out of 5

    K

    I used to work with a Muslim man, and one day, while a co-worker and neighbor of mine were talking about weird things that happened in our apartments, he mentioned that a djinn could be responsible. I had never heard of djinn before, so we had a talk about it. Fast forward to the end of last year, and I make mention of the djinn to my brother--who is heavily into paranormal subjects of any kind--and a few days later, he lends me this book he just bought. This book was an interesting, quick read, I used to work with a Muslim man, and one day, while a co-worker and neighbor of mine were talking about weird things that happened in our apartments, he mentioned that a djinn could be responsible. I had never heard of djinn before, so we had a talk about it. Fast forward to the end of last year, and I make mention of the djinn to my brother--who is heavily into paranormal subjects of any kind--and a few days later, he lends me this book he just bought. This book was an interesting, quick read, even for someone like me who doesn't actually believe in any of it. Some of it was hokey, and I found quite a lot of occurrences that are blamed on djinn could easily nowadays be subscribed to mental or physical deficiencies. However, as someone who has experienced bouts of psychosis, it was fascinating to realize that some of my hallucinations had to do with djinn mythology, such as black dogs and (a connection via the authors and not of exact djinn lore, iirc) shadow people. If visions reoccur throughout our history, could it mean that we really do live in a parallel universe to higher beings? Or is it just a figment of our collective imaginations?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eloise Sunshine

    Well, it sure did give some rather interesting information (I had never heard of the shadow people, for example). Was it all 100% truth the way it was presented, I doubt it, but who knows... They say you can find connections in almost anywhere, if you look hard enough :P. Until we can see the unseen and are capable to act beyond the newtonian laws of physics, most of it is outside our understanding and can only be speculated about. I believe it probably takes about a century or more, until our s Well, it sure did give some rather interesting information (I had never heard of the shadow people, for example). Was it all 100% truth the way it was presented, I doubt it, but who knows... They say you can find connections in almost anywhere, if you look hard enough :P. Until we can see the unseen and are capable to act beyond the newtonian laws of physics, most of it is outside our understanding and can only be speculated about. I believe it probably takes about a century or more, until our scientist develop their knowledge and equipment to the level to research the topic in any manner to be able to prove something, so until that we only have alternative methods and theories given to consider. After about 2/3 of the book I really started to feel bored, because there was too much of it all.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Knippa

    If you are skeptical about the supernatural this book will not convince you otherwise. With that said, the premise was intriguing. I enjoyed the read and will look at the paranormal with a little different lense from now on. As research for the novel I am planning, this book was perfect! With it's footnotes, tables, extensive index, and bibliography I found a wealth of Lore to build the Djinn society around. If you are skeptical about the supernatural this book will not convince you otherwise. With that said, the premise was intriguing. I enjoyed the read and will look at the paranormal with a little different lense from now on. As research for the novel I am planning, this book was perfect! With it's footnotes, tables, extensive index, and bibliography I found a wealth of Lore to build the Djinn society around.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This is one of those books where the authors' mindset going into the book caused them to force their research to fit their theory. As a result, the book fell flat for me. Instead of "Unveiling the Hidden Agenda of Genies" the subtitle should have been "Unveiling the Hidden Agenda of the Authors" IMHO. This is one of those books where the authors' mindset going into the book caused them to force their research to fit their theory. As a result, the book fell flat for me. Instead of "Unveiling the Hidden Agenda of Genies" the subtitle should have been "Unveiling the Hidden Agenda of the Authors" IMHO.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abusamir

    This was an amazing book and its detail into what the Djinn truly are is extraordinary. They went into great depth and effort to get it right spending a lot of time in the Middle East with religious scholars and the likes thereof to truly understand the djinn and expose them to the western world.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Bryan

    Fascinating As a Christian exorcist, I found this volume very interesting and insightful! So grateful to the authors for their careful research and scholarship!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda Marie

    Probably more 3,5 stars

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fatima Syeda

    "The vengeful djinn" is honestly an interesting read. So many things to digest. As the title, suggests, it mainly focuses, examines and provides a narrative on djinns through different perspective: it tries to relate/ build a connection between Djinn world and quantum science; discusses diversity within djinns, their family structure, how they behave, how they are symbolized in different religions and culture, and some ways to protect ourselves from them etc. I would label this one as a must rea "The vengeful djinn" is honestly an interesting read. So many things to digest. As the title, suggests, it mainly focuses, examines and provides a narrative on djinns through different perspective: it tries to relate/ build a connection between Djinn world and quantum science; discusses diversity within djinns, their family structure, how they behave, how they are symbolized in different religions and culture, and some ways to protect ourselves from them etc. I would label this one as a must read because it provides basic information on creatures that live in other dimensions; that often time we subconsciously forget. Plus, as Muslims, we know these creatures exist and we know that Satan belongs to this world, yet we don't really understand how he works. This book is helpful to prepare ourselves against these creatures and struggle to better ourselves. Also, I think one of the reasons why this book is important is because by learning about the Djinns we are also learning about this arch enemy (devil) which Quran tells us to be aware of. Last thing I'd like to add is that I found some of the text illogical, especially things the researcher took from non-shia sources.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lolo

    This book doesnt convince me on the subject because it’s mainly based on Quran and has some bible references. I get it that Djinn are the Demons of Quran, but there a lot of other pre-islamic sources that could be based on. For me this means a lot of religious superstition and I cannot accept a religious text as a historical document or proof for the existense or intentions of metaphysical beings. It was interesting though to read what other people believe and this book also has some folk tales This book doesnt convince me on the subject because it’s mainly based on Quran and has some bible references. I get it that Djinn are the Demons of Quran, but there a lot of other pre-islamic sources that could be based on. For me this means a lot of religious superstition and I cannot accept a religious text as a historical document or proof for the existense or intentions of metaphysical beings. It was interesting though to read what other people believe and this book also has some folk tales from muslim people. The author also tries to blend in some UFO cases in this and this is interesting. Overall it was an ok book to pass the time on the verge of reality and fantasy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Interesting! Contradictory at times, and there's an annoying tendency to conflate 'Christian' with 'Western' every now and then, but interesting. Amusing that the argument for Djinn being behind pretty much everything from leprechauns to aliens is 'yeah, but think about it tho'. An ok if flawed primer, but tbh I'm more interested in what people from the region have to say anyway. Interesting! Contradictory at times, and there's an annoying tendency to conflate 'Christian' with 'Western' every now and then, but interesting. Amusing that the argument for Djinn being behind pretty much everything from leprechauns to aliens is 'yeah, but think about it tho'. An ok if flawed primer, but tbh I'm more interested in what people from the region have to say anyway.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tepintzin

    Interesting, not sure what to make of it. I felt that it should have incorporated Jewish lore as well as Muslim and Christian. The djinn seem to be much more like the Jewish sheydim Christian demons or devils, especially since both djinn and sheydim are not fallen angels.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jay Rothermel

    An attempt to present everything from ghosts to grays as djinns. And the co-author Imbrogno turned out to be a fraud who lied about his military career and academic credentials.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cornerofmadness

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This non-fiction look at the legend of the Djinn is strong in some parts and exceedingly weak in others. It is written from the premise that the Djinn are real. Even if you don't believe that (and I'm not sure I do) it is still interesting enough. The authors have experience in the paranormal. Rosemary Ellen Guiley has written many such books and Philip Imbrogno traveled the Middle East collecting Djinn stories from the people who have the strongest belief in the Djinn. (However, in going to pos This non-fiction look at the legend of the Djinn is strong in some parts and exceedingly weak in others. It is written from the premise that the Djinn are real. Even if you don't believe that (and I'm not sure I do) it is still interesting enough. The authors have experience in the paranormal. Rosemary Ellen Guiley has written many such books and Philip Imbrogno traveled the Middle East collecting Djinn stories from the people who have the strongest belief in the Djinn. (However, in going to post this, there was a comment impugning Imbrogno so I went to check it out and yeah it seems like he lied about a lot which is disturbing and I’m glad I didn’t know it until I read this so it didn’t color my perception.) What most Westerners know of the Djinn (genies) is I Dream of Jeanne or Aladdin, but the Djinn are much darker than that. The authors put forth an interesting theory on what the Djinn are, dwellers of a parallel universe and that they are plasma entities. They put forth some 'evidence' that makes sense. That was the strong part of the book. Equally strong was the collection of Djinn stories from the Middle East and from Muslim-Americans. They went the extra mile and correlated it with the Qu'ran. I really had no idea there were so many references to the Djinn in Muslim holy texts. That was absolutely fascinating and the best part of the book. It begins with these and ends with the Qu'ran and other texts as they deal with getting the Djinn out of your home or out of the possessed. I really enjoyed that part. Equally enjoyable was the look at the Bible and the Djinn, specifically King Solomon and his control over the Djinn. I've read on this before that either Djinn or demons being harnessed to build the Temple of Solomon. I had not read before that the Queen of Sheba might be half Djinn. I also enjoyed reading the types of Djinn and how they aged. These parts were very well documented and footnoted great. What I enjoyed less was that they also tried to conflate the Djinn with aliens and fairies and other supernatural creatures. It wasn't so bad with the aliens. Certainly alien stories could be visitors from a parallel universe, the fairies too I suppose but I felt like they tried so hard to make their point that it was strained to the breaking point. I was a little less interested in the alien/Djinn idea and downright annoyed with the fairie/Djinn correlation. They actually used the movie Leprechaun to further their point. I'm sorry but in a work of non-fiction where you're trying to convince the reader of the reality of the Djinn you cannot use Hollywood movies to support your hypothesis. Frankly I would have rather read a much shorter book that just dealt with the holy texts and folklore and not have them try to conflate the Djinn with every other supernatural. Still, it was mostly an enjoyable read and I'm glad to have an interesting source if I ever want to write about the Djinn.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina Seheri

    In My Opinion: If we consider 4th dimension is time-line of this known world then according to the mentioned life span of Djinn in this book who lives more like thousands of years can not live byond forth dimension because that would make them timeless but they aren't. So if we suppose they live in outter/inner dimensions it must have to be some sort of sub-dimension(not in outer universe) or maybe They actually live in the same dimension as we live like all other animals and creatures except we In My Opinion: If we consider 4th dimension is time-line of this known world then according to the mentioned life span of Djinn in this book who lives more like thousands of years can not live byond forth dimension because that would make them timeless but they aren't. So if we suppose they live in outter/inner dimensions it must have to be some sort of sub-dimension(not in outer universe) or maybe They actually live in the same dimension as we live like all other animals and creatures except we lake the sense or detector to perceive them clearly. That is why when we encounter any activity by them near us seems very paranormal. Hope my opinion make some sense. Note: The term String Theory, Multiverse, Parallel universe in physics are merely hypothesis however Multi-dimensional universe is very real in my opinion and indeed we are actually living in the multi-dimensional universe. We know we are three dimensional being because we have length, Width, and height. There exists higher dimension. Those dimensions we may not be able to intersect without the grace of Allah. Question for writer of the book: if you can accept Djinn as physical being then what prevents you accepting Angels are too? And they can appears physically to the prophet Rather then appear in dream! "The Night of Power is better than a thousands Months. Therein come down the angels and the Spirit (Ar-Rooh, or Jibril) by God's permission on every errand. Peace! This until the rise of morn!'
Was the Creature an Angel or a Djinni?" The correct translation of Rooh suppose to be Soul not Spirit. The writer didn't qouted the refferance here if it is this verse from Al-quran : 'تَعْرُجُ الْمَلَائِكَةُ وَالرُّوحُ إِلَيْهِ فِي يَوْمٍ كَانَ مِقْدَارُهُ خَمْسِينَ أَلْفَ سَنَةٍ The angels and the soul will ascend to Him during a Day the extent of which is fifty thousand years. And also this book contains a lot of spelling error such as they wrote the word 'Fibreil' where it shall be *Jibreil (Gabriel) "spiritual light called poor." It's actually *noor not poor. They were not careful about proofreading the book before publish. "I had the physical sense of weight on my chest. My shoulders were pinned down. It felt as if it was holding a pillow over my face, preventing me from breathing." Thats sounds more like sleep paralysis to me. A sub concious state of human half awake. Islamic sorcerers!!!? there is nothing called islamic sorcerers! It is forbidden in islam to practice magic or sorcery.

  20. 4 out of 5

    The Elves

    The Vengeful Djinn is actually a fairly good account of the Djinn although it has one irritating quality and that is after the authors describe Djinn as the ultimate shapeshifters they proceed to recount tales of Alien Abduction, Haunted Houses, Fairy encounters, and even the Mothman and afterwards ask: could this really have been a Djinn? We expect David Icke’s lizard people may be Djinn as well. We began to wonder if the book had actually been written by tricky Green Djinn who apparently love The Vengeful Djinn is actually a fairly good account of the Djinn although it has one irritating quality and that is after the authors describe Djinn as the ultimate shapeshifters they proceed to recount tales of Alien Abduction, Haunted Houses, Fairy encounters, and even the Mothman and afterwards ask: could this really have been a Djinn? We expect David Icke’s lizard people may be Djinn as well. We began to wonder if the book had actually been written by tricky Green Djinn who apparently love to tease, irritate and play pranks on people. Still, we loved their illumination of the Quran and its references to the Djinn as well as their personal accounts of their own encounters with Djinn. Not a great book but if you are interested in Djinn than it is worth checking out. The Silver Elves authors of The Book of Elven Magick: The Philosophy and Enchantments of the Seelie Elves and The Book of Elven Magick: The Philosophy and Enchantments of the Seelie Elves, Volume 2.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    The Vengeful Djinn was mostly a comparison to our beliefs in the paranormal and God to those of the Islamic Faith. It contained many cross references with God the Bible and Satan. I feel that the Djinn is the comparison to evil in the western world. As many believe ghosts, poltergeist etc., enter our world from another dimension, so do the Djinn. They also have their own classes of hierarchy. This is discussed at great lengths. The comparison is also made that the Mothman prophecies was acted ou The Vengeful Djinn was mostly a comparison to our beliefs in the paranormal and God to those of the Islamic Faith. It contained many cross references with God the Bible and Satan. I feel that the Djinn is the comparison to evil in the western world. As many believe ghosts, poltergeist etc., enter our world from another dimension, so do the Djinn. They also have their own classes of hierarchy. This is discussed at great lengths. The comparison is also made that the Mothman prophecies was acted out by Djinn. It would be very interesting to know if those that witnessed the Mothman were some of those that perished on the Silver Bridge collapse. There is also mention of Point Pleasant being a portal to a parallel reality. The book also made references to UFO's, Fairies, Leprechauns, and Shadow People. For the above comparisons I found the title to be misleading. I think this book would be of value to those who are seeking information on paranormal comparisons. It would also make a very good reference for those who were writing a paper comparing eastern and western cultural beliefs of the paranormal, supernatural and the unknown. Lots of references provided for those who wish to pursue them.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meem Alif Ayn Alef

    Western /Hollywood style faith/ religion... interpretation/s but based on the background of the author, must be appreciated, she brings many things to light for the western audience. But for those who are deep in this research it is not much satisfying, as for beginners and amateurs, this can be a useful text to read a western mindset and how it relates to and conveniently chooses certain sects' translation /interpretation of Quran/ Islam. In that sense, under that light, this is very superficia Western /Hollywood style faith/ religion... interpretation/s but based on the background of the author, must be appreciated, she brings many things to light for the western audience. But for those who are deep in this research it is not much satisfying, as for beginners and amateurs, this can be a useful text to read a western mindset and how it relates to and conveniently chooses certain sects' translation /interpretation of Quran/ Islam. In that sense, under that light, this is very superficial /surfaced... shallow way to interpret Quran as done by majority, Quran being a multidimensional multidisciplinary multilayered and highly coded cryptic cypher can be projected in countless ways, person to person, but we can say for the variety of the western worldviews who are beginning to learn the superficial secrets of Islam, this is not that bad, but it is just superficial at the best, good try, we need more research in this field, thank you, much appreciation and acknowledgement.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Francie Kat

    This is a book written from the assumption that 2 of the 3 desert faiths (Christianity, Islam and Judaism) are unequivocally true; accordingly, it treats all spirit activity unsanctioned by the Bible or Qu'ran as evil. If you enjoy this type of paranormal thriller, this book will probably be novel in that it deals with Middle East mythology which is not well known in the west. Its' basic premise is djinn are (usually) invisible, omnipresent and mostly malevolent. Furthermore, they are quite likel This is a book written from the assumption that 2 of the 3 desert faiths (Christianity, Islam and Judaism) are unequivocally true; accordingly, it treats all spirit activity unsanctioned by the Bible or Qu'ran as evil. If you enjoy this type of paranormal thriller, this book will probably be novel in that it deals with Middle East mythology which is not well known in the west. Its' basic premise is djinn are (usually) invisible, omnipresent and mostly malevolent. Furthermore, they are quite likely responsible for most paranormal or UFO activity, including manifestations of saints and angels. Essentially, a catch-all paranormal conspiracy theory based on the presumption that since djinn are invisible, we can't disprove it. The reason I gave it one star is the American authors discuss Islam respectfully, which may be educational and insightful to some readers.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Azeezur Khan

    For people who know nothing about the Djinn this book is a light entry into that world. However, for people like myself who already live in an environment where we hear things all the time, and grow up with stories of Djinn it's not as great a book for us. However, as a student of physics, I do appreciate the slightly scientific view on the Djinn the author tries to take not to mention the number of different accounts he has collected. I have similar theories and more, but a lot of what he said For people who know nothing about the Djinn this book is a light entry into that world. However, for people like myself who already live in an environment where we hear things all the time, and grow up with stories of Djinn it's not as great a book for us. However, as a student of physics, I do appreciate the slightly scientific view on the Djinn the author tries to take not to mention the number of different accounts he has collected. I have similar theories and more, but a lot of what he said does seem rather hokey and just a little bit too much even for me. Regardless, the book is a light quick read, so I would recommend it to anyone with a fascination for the supernatural, and anyone who wants to be introduced to a an amazing world of knowledge and mystique.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is just one of those strange books which, if you are a believe (or are having brain chemistry issues), will be fun or a dreary slog. For me it was a slog and I never reached the point where I could suspend disbelief. One other major issue. This was the formatting of the Kindle book. What crap! This is of the worst formatted books I've downloaded from Amazon. The responsibility for this is the publisher and the author and they put no effort into this at all. Two strikes and a foul. Not worth This is just one of those strange books which, if you are a believe (or are having brain chemistry issues), will be fun or a dreary slog. For me it was a slog and I never reached the point where I could suspend disbelief. One other major issue. This was the formatting of the Kindle book. What crap! This is of the worst formatted books I've downloaded from Amazon. The responsibility for this is the publisher and the author and they put no effort into this at all. Two strikes and a foul. Not worth your time.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jana Denardo

    A mixed bag book investigating the existence of the Djinn. I do like Ms Guiley's work but her co-author on this has quite a stink about him when it comes to being honest about his background. (didn't know that when I read this). I enjoyed the well documented aspects of this looking at it through the lens of the Muslim, Jewish and Christian holy texts and lore. I didn't care for them trying to extrapolate the Djinn legend to explain aliens, ghosts and fairies. It was a step too far. A mixed bag book investigating the existence of the Djinn. I do like Ms Guiley's work but her co-author on this has quite a stink about him when it comes to being honest about his background. (didn't know that when I read this). I enjoyed the well documented aspects of this looking at it through the lens of the Muslim, Jewish and Christian holy texts and lore. I didn't care for them trying to extrapolate the Djinn legend to explain aliens, ghosts and fairies. It was a step too far.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Some have given this book mixed reviews due to the fact that they are experts on the subject and feel the book is lacking. I have listened to discussions by Rosemary and found her very articulate and balanced. I am not an expert on the subject and found the book both informative and interesting. I could not verify the accuracy of all the information and research but I will say that it filled in holes in my understanding. I am looking forward to reading more of her books.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sharon L.

    I got bored with it, but I still believe!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    An interesting read but at points the book had huge sections of block quotes from the Quran that made it feel like a college student trying to fill out a report paper.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Amborski

    Investigates the Djinn, the Middle Eastern version of fairies or demons.

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