counter create hit Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Bible: A Fresh Look at What Scripture Teaches - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Bible: A Fresh Look at What Scripture Teaches

Availability: Ready to download

If the church is going to use the Bible to decide whether divorce is legitimate in certain cases and whether divorced couples have the right to remarry with the approval and blessing of God’s people, then the Bible must be studied without prejudice toward a particular answer. The author examines the relevant passages in both the Old and New Testaments so that his readers c If the church is going to use the Bible to decide whether divorce is legitimate in certain cases and whether divorced couples have the right to remarry with the approval and blessing of God’s people, then the Bible must be studied without prejudice toward a particular answer. The author examines the relevant passages in both the Old and New Testaments so that his readers can consider the many issues and interpretations that arise in trying to establish a consistently biblical position. As a result, readers can see more clearly and accept more firmly the truth of Scripture. The book succeeds at being exactly what the author wanted it to be: "a comprehensive, lucid, accurate study presented in a readable and practical style. . . ." It is a valuable resource for the pastor, counselor, church leader, and others who are struggling to understand and apply scriptural principles to the problems of divorce and remarriage.


Compare

If the church is going to use the Bible to decide whether divorce is legitimate in certain cases and whether divorced couples have the right to remarry with the approval and blessing of God’s people, then the Bible must be studied without prejudice toward a particular answer. The author examines the relevant passages in both the Old and New Testaments so that his readers c If the church is going to use the Bible to decide whether divorce is legitimate in certain cases and whether divorced couples have the right to remarry with the approval and blessing of God’s people, then the Bible must be studied without prejudice toward a particular answer. The author examines the relevant passages in both the Old and New Testaments so that his readers can consider the many issues and interpretations that arise in trying to establish a consistently biblical position. As a result, readers can see more clearly and accept more firmly the truth of Scripture. The book succeeds at being exactly what the author wanted it to be: "a comprehensive, lucid, accurate study presented in a readable and practical style. . . ." It is a valuable resource for the pastor, counselor, church leader, and others who are struggling to understand and apply scriptural principles to the problems of divorce and remarriage.

30 review for Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Bible: A Fresh Look at What Scripture Teaches

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trent Still

    Best book by Adams I’ve read so far. I appreciate his distinctions and willingness to let Scripture carry the weight. The forgiveness of sins is Christ is an offense to many even in the church and needs to be better applied to divorce and remarriage.

  2. 5 out of 5

    C

    A short and not very deep study of the Bible's teachings on marriage, divorce, and remarriage. I don't agree on all points, but I appreciate the explanation and biblical basis for the arguments. Summary Divorce is biblical in cases of adultery (sexual immorality) and when an unbelieving spouse insists on abandoning a believer. Remarriage is biblical when both spouses were previously unmarried or biblically divorced. "Guilty" party may also remarry after repentance. Notes The disciples' comment that A short and not very deep study of the Bible's teachings on marriage, divorce, and remarriage. I don't agree on all points, but I appreciate the explanation and biblical basis for the arguments. Summary Divorce is biblical in cases of adultery (sexual immorality) and when an unbelieving spouse insists on abandoning a believer. Remarriage is biblical when both spouses were previously unmarried or biblically divorced. "Guilty" party may also remarry after repentance. Notes The disciples' comment that it would be better not to marry (Matt 19:10) shows that they understood Jesus to mean that sexual sin is the only permissible ground for divorce among believers. Deut 24:1-4 refers to an unbiblical/illegitimate divorce (legal but sinful). Wife is defiled by 2nd marriage because her divorce was for unbiblical reasons, not for remarrying per se. When Jesus speaks in Matt 5:32 of causing the divorced wife to commit adultery, he means a wife who is divorced for unbiblical reasons (as the wife of Deut 24); for "any ground" short of fornication. Those individuals had no right to divorce, so the 2nd marriage is adulterous. Anyone who marries someone who's not biblically divorced commits adultery. The words "released" in 1 Cor 7:27-28 are the same in the original: "luo" which means divorce. These verses allow remarriage after divorce. V. 28a is speaking to the divorced couple of v. 27. Ezek 44:22 shows that "priests are in a special class and may not do what is perfectly right for others to do": remarry after divorce. When a person is converted, they are to remain in the state they were in when saved (even in unbiblical marriage or remarriage) (1 Cor 7:17-24). The "guilty" party may remarry after repentance. Just as one may marry a former murderer, one may marry a former adulterer or sinfully divorced person. 1 Cor 7:10-11 means that believers may not divorce. Paul doesn't mention the exception of Matt 19:9, but he knew of it. 1 Cor 7:11 calls divorced couple "unmarried," showing that marriage contract is dissolved. This is also used in Deut 24:1-4. Thus, to say divorced people are "still married in God's sight" is unbiblical. Believers who divorce are required by 1 Cor 7:11 to remain unmarried so they can be reconciled. Deut 24:1-4 uses language that makes it clear that divorce ends the marriage; the woman is only 1 man's wife at a time. Rom 7:1-3 doesn't teach that only death breaks a marriage, because Jesus said that man can (through he may not) put asunder. Also, Paul was simply using marriage as an illustration here. Jesus' statement on divorce in Matt 19 (and parallel passages was speaking to people in the church, responding to comments about Deut 24:1-4, which regulates divorce among believers. He didn't intend to cover all circumstances. In 1 Cor 7:14, to be sanctified by the believer means the unbelieving partner is exposed to the gospel. The children being holy means they're under the care of the church, under positive influences; not that they're necessarily save. 1 Cor 7:12-16 means that believer must do all in their power to remain married to unbeliever, but if unbeliever insists on divorce, believer may divorce. 1 Cor 7:15 means that when unbelieving spouse leaves believer, all bonds of marriage are removed. Word translated "bound" is "duoloo," meaning "to enslave." Exception clause of Matt 5:32 and 19:9 applies to divorce and remarriage in coordination, not just to divorce. In Matt 5:32, "Jesus says that one commits adultery by marrying another unless he has divorced his previous wife for fornication." In Matt 19:9, "the divorced wife and her second husband are warned that they will commit adultery unless she was divorced for fornication." Deut 24:1-4 was meant to eliminate easy divorce by establishing serious consequences.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    Takes a difficult topic and for the most part says that personal opinion doesn’t matter but here is what the Bible says. That I like. What I don’t like is that remarriage (enough of an issue to own 1/3 the title) is only given 2 brief chapters towards the end. The title and introductory chapters make it seem that it will be discussed on full but it appears to just be tacked on at the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zack

    A bit reactionary in tone and surprisingly redundant for a book under 100 pages, it is nonetheless very helpful. I don’t agree with all of Adams’s applications (particularly of 1 Corinthians 6 in the modern US), but most of them are sound and much of the exegetical work is useful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Levi Friesen

    Good, thorough, hermeneutically responsible survey of the Biblical teaching on marriage/divorce/remarriage, with pastoral considerations/realities well integrated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    ☘Tara Sheehan☘

    As an Irish Catholic who is on their second marriage the subject of marriage, divorce and remarriage is particularly close to my heart. The Catholic Church used the bible as their reason to disallow me from my own faith despite the fact that United States law says your spouse can just leave and divorce you regardless of what the church says. Meaning the rest of us who are trying to abide by church law become innocent victims punished by being tossed out through no fault of our own. I was incredi As an Irish Catholic who is on their second marriage the subject of marriage, divorce and remarriage is particularly close to my heart. The Catholic Church used the bible as their reason to disallow me from my own faith despite the fact that United States law says your spouse can just leave and divorce you regardless of what the church says. Meaning the rest of us who are trying to abide by church law become innocent victims punished by being tossed out through no fault of our own. I was incredibly curious where this book was going to fall on that spectrum; was yet another person going to tell me the Church is right and I am barred from my faith or is someone else going to stand by my side to point out the hypocrisy in this? Although the audience for this seemed to be geared more towards ministerial staff than a layperson it’s still written in a way that your average person should be able to grasp the concepts and writing. I liked that he steered away from the oft quoted idea that procreation is a foundational purpose of marriage because that always irritated me when you consider the number of childless couples. Does different genetics make their relationship any less valid than someone who can have kids? What about couples who choose NOT to have them for whatever the reason? You will come away learning about the various scriptures that pertain to marriage, divorce and remarriage as he also provides the various viewpoints so at times I felt like he wasn’t take a hard stance one way or the other but just wanted to provide information so people could come to their own conclusions in a way. His writing is easy to understand and he presented his arguments in a logical, well thought out manner but still at times I felt like he wasn’t really trying to persuade the reader towards one side or the other. In the end what I discovered is there is a lot of conflicting information and sets of rules that apply depending on how you can spin things or the position you hold. Ironically the position I came to after reading this it seems it would be better for the Church to stay out of marriage and let the government handle it as religions make things too complicated and too often punish the innocent. If you’re pro-gay marriage I seriously would NOT recommend this book. I think only traditional bible believing Christians will appreciate this and get any true benefit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    Jay Adams writes with the tact of a bulldozer. He wrote when the divorce culture in the church was rising and not already entrenched as it is today. He basically agrees with John Murray on when divorce is legitimate. He also thinks that if divorce is legitimate then so is remarriage. There are several advantages to Adams’ book over Murray’s. First, Adams discusses marriage. This is a great benefit because it lays out the presuppositions behind his views on divorce. Second, he gives a lot more pr Jay Adams writes with the tact of a bulldozer. He wrote when the divorce culture in the church was rising and not already entrenched as it is today. He basically agrees with John Murray on when divorce is legitimate. He also thinks that if divorce is legitimate then so is remarriage. There are several advantages to Adams’ book over Murray’s. First, Adams discusses marriage. This is a great benefit because it lays out the presuppositions behind his views on divorce. Second, he gives a lot more practical application. Third, he is clearer. Even when one disagrees, at least you know exactly what he is saying. Fourth, the book is very practical. Still, Murray’s book is a more in-depth exegetical study than Adams’ is. At times Adams exegesis was thin. To his credit he did try to give some basic guidelines for handling remarriage, but I felt like these were insufficient though better than Murray. Murray and Adams work well together and would give the reader a good idea of the arguments for the conservative, but not permanence, view of divorce.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kirk Miller

    Content -- good. Tone -- could be improved at points, particularly when dealing with those with whine he disagrees (typical Jay Adams). Sometimes a little simplistic in its handling of things. Sometimes the opposite: stances were so, "If this, then that... If this, than that... If this, then..." (etc.) that things felt several levels removed from the text itself, and one began to feel suspicious of their legitimacy. But, all in all, an impressive little treatment -- cuts through a complex issue with Content -- good. Tone -- could be improved at points, particularly when dealing with those with whine he disagrees (typical Jay Adams). Sometimes a little simplistic in its handling of things. Sometimes the opposite: stances were so, "If this, then that... If this, than that... If this, then..." (etc.) that things felt several levels removed from the text itself, and one began to feel suspicious of their legitimacy. But, all in all, an impressive little treatment -- cuts through a complex issue with a lot of clarity (even if being in danger of a little over-simplicity at times).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim Voss

    The audience for the book is pastors, but anyone with knowledge of the Bible can understand it. Very detailed look at the topic of marriage in the Bible. Adams is a professor at Westminster Theological Seminary and was a pastor. His emphasis is the grace of God.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J.E. Jr.

    Good book, examining a subject that is far too neglected theologically. I like Adams’ careful commitment to being scripturally-based in all of his conclusions, and he does some good exegetical work. It’s a bit dry at times, but not prohibitively so.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Great. Really good. Also read in April of 1988.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seth Meyers

    The book in a sentence: Divorce and remarriage are possible under a great many circumstances loosely bound by the categories of sexual sin and the desire of an unbeliever. I cannot recall reading a book that caricatured the opposing view more. According to Adams, the "No Divorce, No remarriage" position has "no support in the Scriptures and, indeed, the usage of the entire Bible annihilates it." (page 56) There is "no basis" for their "theory." (56) In fact the entire discussion of divorce and r The book in a sentence: Divorce and remarriage are possible under a great many circumstances loosely bound by the categories of sexual sin and the desire of an unbeliever. I cannot recall reading a book that caricatured the opposing view more. According to Adams, the "No Divorce, No remarriage" position has "no support in the Scriptures and, indeed, the usage of the entire Bible annihilates it." (page 56) There is "no basis" for their "theory." (56) In fact the entire discussion of divorce and remarriage is fairly simple, "His Word is so explicit that there is no room for speculation and doubt." (page 8). Those who disagree with him are urged to "Try to lay your prejudice aside" because he certainly he has no prejudices nor has any sinful or weak tendency manifested itself in his argument. Though he agrees with John Murray's book on Divorce, it is "hesitant and incomplete at so many vital points... crabbed,... tedious,... wrong,... and limited." Another book which agrees with Adams is "thin and poorly written." Therefore, Adams will take up the pen since the "Christian church still awaits a comprehensive, lucid, accurate study." (page viii) Adams does not deal verse by verse with Matthew 19 and barely references Mark 10 or Luke 16. His only discussion of Jesus' teaching on divorce is his treatment of the exception clause in Matt. 19:9 or 5:32. Nor does he discuss Romans 7:2-4 although he does admit in a footnote (page 44) that his view of divorce "would complicate and thus defeat the intent" of Paul's teaching. He does not discuss Eph. 5, or Christ's commitment never to divorce his oft offending wife, and the believer's responsibility to love as Christ loved. He handles Jer. 3:8 with brazen disrespect yet fails to read the entire chapter which calls Jehovah Israel's husband regardless of her sin. Jay Adams has offered the church much better presentations of Scriptural truth, and we may hope that this little book will soon lapse from the printer's cycle.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    A mixed bag. Adams is right that 1 Cor 7 is about divorce, not separation. He helpfully rejects Murray’s notion that some divorced people are “still married in God’s eyes”; Paul calls them “unmarried.” But there are several things in this book that are questionable or just wrong. Adams thinks that if you forgive, you are not allowed to divorce. So if a woman is married to an abusive man (and I don't think Adams ever brings up abuse, which is unfortunate) or, let's say, a husband who has committed A mixed bag. Adams is right that 1 Cor 7 is about divorce, not separation. He helpfully rejects Murray’s notion that some divorced people are “still married in God’s eyes”; Paul calls them “unmarried.” But there are several things in this book that are questionable or just wrong. Adams thinks that if you forgive, you are not allowed to divorce. So if a woman is married to an abusive man (and I don't think Adams ever brings up abuse, which is unfortunate) or, let's say, a husband who has committed adultery for a decade or even a pedophile, she must forgive him if he asks for forgiveness and then, having forgiven him, may not divorce him. This is like saying that if your employee robs you blind and then asks for forgiveness, you may not fire him or turn him over to the police. This is going beyond what Scripture requires. Adams' interpretation of Deut 24 is quite strange: he thinks that the “thing of nakedness” [erwath dabar] here is anything that a husband doesn’t like, any ground on which he wishes to divorce his wife—and that the law isn’t saying that’s okay but is simply saying that a husband who divorces his wife for no just cause cannot take her back if she marries someone else in between. Some of Adams’ “the Bible has an answer” stuff seems too simplistic, too cut and dried, especially when one of the steps is “if the other church won’t listen to your church, then your church should declare that church to not be a church”! In short, though there are some helpful things in this book and a pastor could benefit from working through them, I would not recommend this book to anyone else.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Harvey

    Though the biblical data is not always easy to understand and apply, Jay Adams does an admirable job sorting through the difficulties and creating a coherent practical theology of divorce and remarriage that is thoroughly biblical. I recommend this to any serious student of theology, especially to pastors and church leaders. The most remarkable aspect of this book is its insistence (refreshingly so) that, between Christians, legal disputes such as divorce proceedings should never spill out into t Though the biblical data is not always easy to understand and apply, Jay Adams does an admirable job sorting through the difficulties and creating a coherent practical theology of divorce and remarriage that is thoroughly biblical. I recommend this to any serious student of theology, especially to pastors and church leaders. The most remarkable aspect of this book is its insistence (refreshingly so) that, between Christians, legal disputes such as divorce proceedings should never spill out into the public court system. Instead, disputes are to be handled by the church applying discipline, the right and privilege of every Christian.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth Peninger

    Originally I gave this title 4 stars. I am revising my stars to zero. The reason I am doing so is that since reading this title, several things about my faith journey and expression have changed and I no longer subscribe to evangelical ideologies. Additionally, I was trained to be a lay counselor using this bible-based (only) method and I have first-hand experience as a counselor and counselee that this method does more harm than healing, promotes toxicity, enables inequality between women and men Originally I gave this title 4 stars. I am revising my stars to zero. The reason I am doing so is that since reading this title, several things about my faith journey and expression have changed and I no longer subscribe to evangelical ideologies. Additionally, I was trained to be a lay counselor using this bible-based (only) method and I have first-hand experience as a counselor and counselee that this method does more harm than healing, promotes toxicity, enables inequality between women and men, and more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katharine

    Really only worth reading for his clearly stating (and let's say it once more for most of the southern Christians I know, in the back) that the Bible does NOT state that having children should be the MAIN reason for and purpose of your marriage, and the marriage is not a failure if no children result of it. It's so nice when people actually read the Scriptures and don't combine their hazy memory of it with superfluous dogma and American commercialized propaganda to MAKE BABIES MAKE BABIES MAKE B Really only worth reading for his clearly stating (and let's say it once more for most of the southern Christians I know, in the back) that the Bible does NOT state that having children should be the MAIN reason for and purpose of your marriage, and the marriage is not a failure if no children result of it. It's so nice when people actually read the Scriptures and don't combine their hazy memory of it with superfluous dogma and American commercialized propaganda to MAKE BABIES MAKE BABIES MAKE BABIES OR SOMETHING IS VERY WRONG WITH YOU.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Ivester

    Adams presents a biblical theology of marriage, divorce, and remarriage in this book. While not everyone will agree at every point, it is certainly worthwhile to wrestle with the Scriptures he cites on these difficult issues. Also, he gives helpful recommendations on how to present truth with grace. This is a helpful read on the subject.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Venuso

    Makes a compelling (though synthetic case) that because Christians aren't to go to law with other Christians in good standing, they may never divorce a Christian in good standing (1 Cor 6). So, in cases of fornication, a spouse should take the sin to the church (Matt 18). The church should discipline. Only when the person is unrepentant can the believer then divorce on these grounds (1 Cor 7). Makes a compelling (though synthetic case) that because Christians aren't to go to law with other Christians in good standing, they may never divorce a Christian in good standing (1 Cor 6). So, in cases of fornication, a spouse should take the sin to the church (Matt 18). The church should discipline. Only when the person is unrepentant can the believer then divorce on these grounds (1 Cor 7).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Ventura

    Not a bad starting point to get introduced to some of the basic teaching of Scripture. I was surprised by how short the book was considering this topic is the most complicated issue in pastoral counseling.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Fang

    concise, helpful and straightforward. It's a good book to establish a biblical view on divorce and remarriage. However, it does not cover all complicated issues. But author points out that it's human sin that made the whole situation complicated, not Biblical commands make it complicated. concise, helpful and straightforward. It's a good book to establish a biblical view on divorce and remarriage. However, it does not cover all complicated issues. But author points out that it's human sin that made the whole situation complicated, not Biblical commands make it complicated.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Kurtz

    There were a few places where Adams' reasoning seemed to be a bit strained, but overall this is a great book for anyone who wants to know what the Bible has to say about divorce and remarriage. There were a few places where Adams' reasoning seemed to be a bit strained, but overall this is a great book for anyone who wants to know what the Bible has to say about divorce and remarriage.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Really helpful and concise. The writing is a bit difficult to follow sometimes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Thoughtful, logical, and strictly biblical. I'm still not sure if I agree with every conclusion, but even so, this is a very helpful book. It challenged me in many areas. Thoughtful, logical, and strictly biblical. I'm still not sure if I agree with every conclusion, but even so, this is a very helpful book. It challenged me in many areas.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam Hettinga

    Sadly lacking.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah Horner

    I wish I had read this years ago. I'll be reading it again. I wish I had read this years ago. I'll be reading it again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Veis

    Older book but gave me good insights into the Bible. Deep but quick read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Markin

    Helpful! Although no information on abuse in marriages.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    Competent to Counsel was epoch making for kicking off the Biblical Counseling movement, and his manual on church discipline is very good. But otherwise I find his writings sometimes a tad narrow. And I think he seems to fail to see the irony in the ways his own Biblical readings are shaped by psychology (esp. Behavorialism). The contemporary CCEF authors are better, I think. But this book on marriage is about the best short summary of the key texts and applications I've found. The only major fla Competent to Counsel was epoch making for kicking off the Biblical Counseling movement, and his manual on church discipline is very good. But otherwise I find his writings sometimes a tad narrow. And I think he seems to fail to see the irony in the ways his own Biblical readings are shaped by psychology (esp. Behavorialism). The contemporary CCEF authors are better, I think. But this book on marriage is about the best short summary of the key texts and applications I've found. The only major flaw: in chapter 1 (pp.8-20) he wisely asks what the most foundational purpose of marriage is. He rightly refutes certain cultural answers -- procreation, happiness, sex, etc. These are important but secondary. But then in the end he chooses an equally problematic answer -- marriage is primarily a 'covenant of companionship.' Doesn't Gen. 1-2 say that? But, I wonder, if companionship is the foundation of marriage, then what if one partner is not being a loving companion? Can the other partner freely leave? Adams would say no, but he's being inconsistent. I think the Bible teaches in Gen. 1-2, read in light of Eph. 5, COl. 3, Rev. 21 etc., that marriage's primary purpose is to make us image bearers of God. Then Gen. 1-2 ('not good to be alone') is saying that a male-female couple together bear the image of God better than one person can alone. Anyway, if you cut that section out, this is an excellent book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tj Freeman

    This is a go to book when I have a question about marriage, divorce, or remarriage. Jay Adams equips the reader to handle the very sensitive and sometimes muddy situations that arise when marriages go sour. This book has blessed many of my counselees in many ways. For some it has provided Biblical evidence that separation as seen in culture today is not a Biblical option. For others it has has freed the conscience of a brother or sister who has experienced a Biblical divorce. And for many it has This is a go to book when I have a question about marriage, divorce, or remarriage. Jay Adams equips the reader to handle the very sensitive and sometimes muddy situations that arise when marriages go sour. This book has blessed many of my counselees in many ways. For some it has provided Biblical evidence that separation as seen in culture today is not a Biblical option. For others it has has freed the conscience of a brother or sister who has experienced a Biblical divorce. And for many it has reoriented their understanding of love and commitment to match Scripture. If you're married, or know someone who is, this book is a must read. You will be surprised how much the world has influenced your understanding of marriage.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    such good info! Definitely worth reading more than once.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.