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"This book is an instant classic that deserves a wide readership." --from the forward by A. Andrew Das, distinguished chair, Professor of Religious Studies, Elmhurst College. This volume by Dr. Thomas R. Schreiner on the interplay between Christianity and biblical law is an excellent addition to the 40 Questions & Answers series. Schreiner not only coherently answers the t "This book is an instant classic that deserves a wide readership." --from the forward by A. Andrew Das, distinguished chair, Professor of Religious Studies, Elmhurst College. This volume by Dr. Thomas R. Schreiner on the interplay between Christianity and biblical law is an excellent addition to the 40 Questions & Answers series. Schreiner not only coherently answers the tough questions that flow from a discussion about the Old Testament Levitical Law, but also writes clearly and engagingly for the student. The pastor, student, and layperson can easily understand Schreiner's biblical theology of the Law. The reader will enjoy the clarity and encouragement of 40 Questions About Christians and Biblical Law. The simple Q&A format allows readers to skip to questions of interest. Questions include: What does the word law mean in the Scriptures] Was the Mosaic covenant legalistic] Does the OT teach that salvation is by works] What does the expression "works of law" mean in Paul] Is perfect obedience to the law mandatory for salvation] Does Paul teach that the OT law is now abolished] >What does Paul mean by "righteousness of God"] Does the Pauline teaching on justification contradict Jesus' message] Do James and Paul contradict one another on justification by works] How should we understand the role of the law in Luke-Acts] What is theonomy, or Christian reconstructionism, and how should it be evaluated] What role does the law have in preaching]


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"This book is an instant classic that deserves a wide readership." --from the forward by A. Andrew Das, distinguished chair, Professor of Religious Studies, Elmhurst College. This volume by Dr. Thomas R. Schreiner on the interplay between Christianity and biblical law is an excellent addition to the 40 Questions & Answers series. Schreiner not only coherently answers the t "This book is an instant classic that deserves a wide readership." --from the forward by A. Andrew Das, distinguished chair, Professor of Religious Studies, Elmhurst College. This volume by Dr. Thomas R. Schreiner on the interplay between Christianity and biblical law is an excellent addition to the 40 Questions & Answers series. Schreiner not only coherently answers the tough questions that flow from a discussion about the Old Testament Levitical Law, but also writes clearly and engagingly for the student. The pastor, student, and layperson can easily understand Schreiner's biblical theology of the Law. The reader will enjoy the clarity and encouragement of 40 Questions About Christians and Biblical Law. The simple Q&A format allows readers to skip to questions of interest. Questions include: What does the word law mean in the Scriptures] Was the Mosaic covenant legalistic] Does the OT teach that salvation is by works] What does the expression "works of law" mean in Paul] Is perfect obedience to the law mandatory for salvation] Does Paul teach that the OT law is now abolished] >What does Paul mean by "righteousness of God"] Does the Pauline teaching on justification contradict Jesus' message] Do James and Paul contradict one another on justification by works] How should we understand the role of the law in Luke-Acts] What is theonomy, or Christian reconstructionism, and how should it be evaluated] What role does the law have in preaching]

30 review for 40 Questions about Christians and Biblical Law

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marc Sims

    Really, really helpful. All the books in the “40 questions” series are gold, and Schreiner has a really hard time writing a bad book. This examines everything from how Christians under the new covenant relate to the Law, to the New Perspective, justification, Christ’s fulfillment of the Law, etc. Plus, all sorts of practical questions, like whether or not Christians are bound to the Sabbath, tithing, how to preach the Law, and a chapter on responding to theonomists. All of it great, accessible, Really, really helpful. All the books in the “40 questions” series are gold, and Schreiner has a really hard time writing a bad book. This examines everything from how Christians under the new covenant relate to the Law, to the New Perspective, justification, Christ’s fulfillment of the Law, etc. Plus, all sorts of practical questions, like whether or not Christians are bound to the Sabbath, tithing, how to preach the Law, and a chapter on responding to theonomists. All of it great, accessible, and balanced.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wallace

    This is the third of this series I have read, and each book is superb! This is an excellent treatment, in question and answer format, about Christians and biblical law. Thomas Schreiner, rightly in my view, concludes that the Mosaic law in all it's aspects has been fulfilled in Jesus Christ and is therefore no longer binding upon the Christian, who is under the requirements of the new covenant and not the 'old.' Schreiner's scholarship and deft treatment of many evangelical 'holy cows' is extreme This is the third of this series I have read, and each book is superb! This is an excellent treatment, in question and answer format, about Christians and biblical law. Thomas Schreiner, rightly in my view, concludes that the Mosaic law in all it's aspects has been fulfilled in Jesus Christ and is therefore no longer binding upon the Christian, who is under the requirements of the new covenant and not the 'old.' Schreiner's scholarship and deft treatment of many evangelical 'holy cows' is extremely creditable and helpful. I recommend this volume without exception to all. I wish I had had such a volume 35 years ago, I think I could have saved myself from a lot of hurt and perplexity. A 5-star read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Argin Gerigorian

    This week I picked up a book by a phenomenal Baptist scholar named Thomas Schreiner from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary entitled “40 Questions About Christians and Biblical Law”. Schreiner has been a heavy critic of the New Perspective on Paul and of N.T Wright. He also defends the doctrine of justification by faith alone via imputed righteousness so as to earn my deep respect! He’s a very perceptive author and quite easy to read. His vast array of knowledge has earned him a spot with This week I picked up a book by a phenomenal Baptist scholar named Thomas Schreiner from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary entitled “40 Questions About Christians and Biblical Law”. Schreiner has been a heavy critic of the New Perspective on Paul and of N.T Wright. He also defends the doctrine of justification by faith alone via imputed righteousness so as to earn my deep respect! He’s a very perceptive author and quite easy to read. His vast array of knowledge has earned him a spot with some of the top theologians of our day. With that said his views on the law and the covenants is inferior, poor and contradictory. One of the main questions he tries to answer is “Is the Mosaic law still normative for believers?” (pg. 13) He doesn’t go through the theological systems that deal with this, and similar, questions. However, if I were to classify him he would be closest to New Covenant Theology. Be that as it may I want to quickly run through some of the arguments Schreiner gives in defense of his view and interact with it. Schreiner starts off question number one by defining the terms. A very good place to start. His question is “What does the word law mean in the Scriptures?” Here’s where I think our foundations are established enabling us to move forward. Schreiner defines “Torah” as “keeping of commandments” and what “human beings are commanded to do” (pg. 19) focusing on the obeying, keeping, doing etc. It makes sense to establish this view in the very first question so that you can elaborate your vies in light of your starting premises. Here’s exactly where we disagree. I take Torah to mean instruction…more of a relational and gracious guide for Israelites. Here are some of my reasons why. These will be based off Hebrew etymology and specific texts Hebrew Etymology- “Towrah”- somewhat misleadingly rendered “nomos” in Greek. Torah should not be reduced to regulation but wider to represent instruction or teaching. 1. Torah comes from the verb “yara” which means to teach, instruct, direct, inform, etc. (Gen. 46:28, Ex. 4:12, 15, Ex. 15: 25, Ex. 24:12, Lev. 20:11, etc) 2. Torah is much richer than just “regulation”; it means teaching or instruction that guides. (Ex. 24:12, Isa. 2:3, Deut. 29:29, etc) 3. Torah is not just “Do this. Don’t do that”, its instruction pertaining to salvation and point out the spiritual way of life. (Ps. 119, 19, Deut. 31:12, Deut. 33:9-10, Ps. 78:10, Ps. 1:2) Psalm 1 says that some people walk a certain way “council of the wicked”, others take “council in the way of Jehovah”. This is more than “do’s and don’ts”. Ps. 37:31. Torah is the way we walk. 3. Torah is the Divine Instruction guiding his people for their walk in the path of life. Deut. 32:46, “Torah… is your life”. Text Leviticus 18:5- “you shall keep my ordinances, if a man do he shall live in them”. This is a controversial verse. The Pharisees laid hold on this verse to prove their point. Paul uses this against them. So does this prove that by keeping the law one earns his salvation? No! Moses has already said that Torah is a way of living, thus we do what God commands not as a way to enter life, but as our lifestyle. In the Old Testament there never was an offer of life by our works. Never did God say do these things and I will save you. Torah is not a stairway to heaven! Deuteronomy 4:1- how do we take “that you may live” portion? As a presumption that they were dead and if they obeyed God would save them? Or that God has saved them and this is their life now, as their blessing. (Deut. 10:12, Deut. 5:33, “that it may go well with you”, it doesn’t say and it *will* go well with you (as if it were a covenant of works)”, here is your life now enter into it abundantly; Deut. 30:15-16, 19, Prov. 13:14, etc.) Hebrews 3:19- “they were unable to enter because of unbelief.” Unbelief kept them from the Promised Land. And then he turns around in Hebrews 4:2 saying- the gospel came to us exactly as it came to them, but there’s was not united by faith. Greatest Men of the Torah- Abraham and Moses Romans 4:3, Paul quotes from the Torah to prove justification by faith alone. The Torah (broadly and narrowly) was always God’s gracious dealings with His people. Exodus 19:4-8- Israel obeys God’s gracious dealing. Full enjoyment of all that God has given comes through covenantal obedience. God said I’ve have saved you, now if you want to enjoy the full blessing of this covenant then you must obey. This same blessing is repeated in the church, in 1 Peter 2. So how can the same blessing in the NT be gracious but the one in the OT be works based? Deuteronomy 6:20-25- the meaning of the law is that God has saved us! He wants us to enjoy life and has given us an instruction by which to enjoy it by. The law meant grace in the OT! Romans 9:30-10:8 Paul won’t even say “They did not pursue it by faith but by works” BUT “as if it were of works”, meaning that it’s not even possible, thus they turned the gracious covenant into a covenant of works. As if God ever approved of the works approach. They never did what the law told them, they fell short. Having said that Paul says “they stumbled at the stone of stumbling”. Because Israel approached the torah by works as it were, the completely stumbled over the Messiah to come. When Israel misconstrued there idea of law and grace, when they didn’t see that faith was the way should approach the Torah, for righteousness, and then when the promises of the Messiah were given, they completely fell down. That’s why Paul’s heart was broken (ch. 10:1), because the Jews had the Torah, “how could they miss it” he thought. And then (v. 2) he says they want to do what God wants them to do, but they don’t understand properly, because (v. 3) “being ignorant of the righteousness of God and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God’s righteousness.” When you approach the Torah not by faith but as it were by works, then you don’t establish God’s righteousness but your own, and that’s what Paul says they missed! Now how could Paul tell them that they’ve missed it when our opponents say that the OT is legalistic and works based? He says they didn’t understand the Torah, the very thing that did reveal righteousness by faith alone. Had they understood it they would not have stumbled! Next, (v. 4) if they stumbled at the stone of stumbling because they didn’t approach the Torah right, “Christ is the aim of the law”, Christ is the very purpose of the law the end goal of the law for righteousness. For since Christ was the end and the Jews didn’t believe they tried to establish their own. Again, (v. 5, 6), now most commentators will say that Paul presents one approach and it’s pitted against another approach “shall live by them” (Covenant of Works), “shall believe” (Covenant of Grace). Or, Moses sets out legalism, so that you have to follow the law to live, and then “BUT”, the righteousness of faith says this… the only problem is that that isn’t what Moses meant in the Old Testament by saying that. Finally (v. 8) Paul quotes Deuteronomy 30, speaking about the commandments of God as the faith which we preach. Anyways back to Schreiner… He writes concerning the Mosaic covenant that “thetom Schreiner common covenant pattern (obedience as a result of salvation) exists between the Sinai covenant and the new covenant”…granted that does not mean they “are the same in every respect” (pg. 27). So does he then take back what he said about the definition of torah? Because if torah is strictly regulations and commands then that carries over into the new covenant because we are called to obey after being redeemed; but since Schriener doesn’t want that…will he change his definition of torah to instructions or teachings? Beware Schreiner does this often… In question #6 about Paul addressing Legalism, Schreiner writes “Paul stresses that Abraham did not live under the law (cf. Rom. 5:12-14; Gal. 3:15-18). According to Paul, Abraham could legitimately boast if he did the necessary works.” (pg. 49) However I ask “works according to what?” If Abraham had no law what works would have given him opportunity to boast? Only he who works out the law perfectly has a right to boast. Going back once more to page 25 we find Schreiner saying “the Mosaic covenant [Torah] was not legalistic in this sense” [referring to the idea of earning salvation by obedience]. Now coming again to page 50 on the topic of Paul and legalism he writes, “[Paul's] Pharisaic devotion to the law [torah] (Phil. 3:5) demonstrates that he was also proud of what he accomplished, of his own obedience to what the Torah required.” So which is it? Does the Torah require obedience unto salvation as per Schreiner’s comments on page 50 or is the Torah not legalistic in it’s offer of salvation as per his comments on page 25? But wait there’s more… In Question #9 he asks “Does Paul teach that the old testament law is now abolished?” His first argument is very mixed up and I’ve witnessed people fall into it often these days. He in essence argues that since the pedagogical function of the law has ceased because faith has come that therefore the normative is gone too because Paul is writing we are no longer under the law (Gal. 3:23). Skipping over arguments 2 and 3 his fourth and fifth argument suggests that the law is no longer normative because of Paul’s apparent denunciation of “food laws, circumcision, sabbath and Ephesians 2:15″ (pg. 70-71). All of which point to the ceremonial law with some heavy exegesis on the distinction between the moral Sabbath which is perpetual and the ceremonial sabbath which is abolished. I understand Schreiner doesn’t think the distinction into moral, ceremonial and civil is valid but even he says that it “has some cogency” and “seems appropriate to designate such commands as moral norms” (pg. 93) Hopefully in future post I can discuss the validity of such a distinction and be able to defend it clearly from the pages of Scripture if time permits maybe we can interact with the contrary view later on… Lastly (as I need some sleep and don’t want to make this post extra long) I want to highlight what Schreiner believes to be a biblical position but contradicts himself literally in a matter of sentences. On page 91 he writes, “…the entirety of the Old Testament [Mosaic] law is abrogated in Christ” indicating that all the law (if I may…moral, ceremonial and civil) is abolished, abrogated, obsolete to the Christian in every way imaginable. But yet on page 92 he writes on the “civil” law, “I’m not suggesting from the above comments that the Old Testament “civil” laws have no relevance to nation states today. Rather how and whether those laws apply requires careful theological discussion.” What?! To quote Rushdoony this is classified as “Intellectual Schizophrenia”. If the entirety of the Mosaic law is abolished then we can’t draw anything normative for us, remember it doesn’t apply to us because God didn’t covenant with us (according to Schreiner’s previous comments). It would be inconstantly commendable for Schreiner to stop at the moral law having relevance to us but he goes further to the civil law and suggests that it can have relevance to nations today! Schreiner sounds like a theonomist! He even says this while commenting on 1 Corinthians 5:13, “the law is both abolished and fulfilled” because “believers are no longer called upon to execute those who commit the sins specified in Deuteronomy, but it does not follow that the commands to purge evil from the community has no relevance to the church…instead [and I'm dead serious] the Mosaic law and covenant are no longer normative for believers.” (pg. 92-93). In one paragraph he blatantly contradicts himself. All in all I wish I could write more on Schreiner’s views and some good points that he highlights in his book (Interpretation of Matthew 5:21-48, upholding Justification by faith alone, comparison of James and Paul, etc) and criticize some short-comings, but time does not permit. I do in the end recommend this book to more serious students of the law and it’s application to Christians. Whether you are strictly reformed and want a scholarly modified baptistic view which will challenge some of your exegesis or a proponent of new covenantal theology and need a good work to read agreeing with 90% of the teachings. I give this book a 4/5 in it’s writing style and a 3.5/5 in it’s theological content.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Spencer R

    An excellent book on the law in the Bible. Schreiner clearly elucidates the place of the law in the Bible, and helps one to see its nuances. In only a few of the "questions" does Schreiner drop Greek grammatical terms into the discussion, which makes for a slower read; for the majority of the book, his prose is clear and how he pulls Scripture together is helpful. An excellent book on the law in the Bible. Schreiner clearly elucidates the place of the law in the Bible, and helps one to see its nuances. In only a few of the "questions" does Schreiner drop Greek grammatical terms into the discussion, which makes for a slower read; for the majority of the book, his prose is clear and how he pulls Scripture together is helpful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Brackbill

    Very helpful introduction/survey of the issues involved with this topic. Anyone who preaches consecutively through books of the Bible has to deal with this major theological issue and I found this to be a great read. Though he clearly argues for his own positions he also gives and even lists the argumentation for opposing positions. The Q and A set up makes it very valuable for quick reference. His answers are concise and substantive. It is certainly not exhaustive, but in the end probablyu Thoug Very helpful introduction/survey of the issues involved with this topic. Anyone who preaches consecutively through books of the Bible has to deal with this major theological issue and I found this to be a great read. Though he clearly argues for his own positions he also gives and even lists the argumentation for opposing positions. The Q and A set up makes it very valuable for quick reference. His answers are concise and substantive. It is certainly not exhaustive, but in the end probablyu Though he does not "preach" a system dispensationalists and Presbyterians will not appreciate this side swipe: "If dispensationalists tend to read the new covenant in light of the old when it comes to eschatology, some Presbyterians are prone to reading the new covenant in light of the old in terms of ecclesiology and on the question of the law" (p. 225). I should also mention that he deals effectively with the New Perspective on Paul in several questions.

  6. 4 out of 5

    NerdyTheologians

    Normally, broad “question and answer” style books that cover a wide range or narrow range of topics can be...shallow. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. But I was really surprised by how dense this book was. * Dr. Schreiner is one of my favorite authors and scholars and although I disagree with him on points in this book it was a fantastic read nonetheless. * He covers a wide variety of questions about and aspects of the Law, and he does so gracefully and (surprisingly at times) thoroughly. Normally, broad “question and answer” style books that cover a wide range or narrow range of topics can be...shallow. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. But I was really surprised by how dense this book was. * Dr. Schreiner is one of my favorite authors and scholars and although I disagree with him on points in this book it was a fantastic read nonetheless. * He covers a wide variety of questions about and aspects of the Law, and he does so gracefully and (surprisingly at times) thoroughly. There were quite a few chapters I had to read twice because it was just that meaty. * Some of the chapters covered: what does the Law mean in the Scriptures, what is the new perspective on Pau, does Paul’s message contradict Jesus’ message, what is the role of the Law in each gospel, sabbath keeping, and theonomy (albeit to briefly for my needs, hah!). * I highly recommend this book and it’s quality has me excited for the others in the series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This book is great as an introduction to Christian use of the law. Schreiner's answers are compact and helpful, which is amazing considering the difficulty of some of the subject matter. He summarizes key issues well without getting lost in the weeds. I can imagine this will become a go-to resource. This book is great as an introduction to Christian use of the law. Schreiner's answers are compact and helpful, which is amazing considering the difficulty of some of the subject matter. He summarizes key issues well without getting lost in the weeds. I can imagine this will become a go-to resource.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Excellent! While I don’t agree with all of his conclusions, this is probably the most helpful, succinct book I have read on this important subject. Schreiner is faithful to Scripture and keeps the Good News of Jesus Christ central. So good!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jon Patterson

    A good introduction to various questions surrounding how Christians relate to the biblical law. I found the answers wanting for more depth, but this book is a good launching pad to familiarize the reader with various debates surrounding this issue.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Seth Channell

    Very helpful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Philip Brown

    Solid. Not with him on Romans 2. Pretty sure I'm not with him on James 2. But mate, solid stuff. I am keen to do further dabbling into virtually every chapter. Schreiner is terrific. Solid. Not with him on Romans 2. Pretty sure I'm not with him on James 2. But mate, solid stuff. I am keen to do further dabbling into virtually every chapter. Schreiner is terrific.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Choi

    An excellent primer on the Law and how it relates to Christians and the church today. Schreiner, in his typically lucid style, explains the various ways that the Bible speaks about the Law. The 40 questions that organize the book are grouped into sections: The Law in the OT; The Law and Paul; The Law in the Gospels & Acts; The Law in the General Epistles; and a final section examining the Law's relationship to a variety of contemporary issues such as sabbatarianism, theonomy, and homiletics. Als An excellent primer on the Law and how it relates to Christians and the church today. Schreiner, in his typically lucid style, explains the various ways that the Bible speaks about the Law. The 40 questions that organize the book are grouped into sections: The Law in the OT; The Law and Paul; The Law in the Gospels & Acts; The Law in the General Epistles; and a final section examining the Law's relationship to a variety of contemporary issues such as sabbatarianism, theonomy, and homiletics. Also covered under the "Law in Paul" section are a number of chapters devoted to the New Perspective. Finally, a helpful summary section and a few reflection questions conclude each chapter. Generally, a brief outlining of the various stances to the relevant question are followed by Schreiner's argument for his own view. There is plenty of Scripture to support his stated positions. I also appreciated the unity of the book. It didn't read like 40 short essays that were irrelevant to one another. Rather, Schreiner would often cite and refer to conclusions reached in earlier parts of the book (arranging the book according to a rough biblical chronology facilitated this). The strengths of this book lie in Schreiner's lucid and straightforward prose and analysis, its organization that makes it a handy reference guide for future use, and the book's relevance to contemporary issues (e.g., NPP, Christian Reconstructionism, etc.). I'd recommend it to anyone looking for a basic grasp on the Christian's relationship to the Law.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    Schreiner has made a very complex subject just a little less complex. No one should be fooled into thinking that he has dumb-downed very complex problems. That would not serve anyone and be helpful at the end of the day. Instead, Schreiner has taken very complex questions in bite-sized form. So each chapter is about 2-3 pages (most anyway) or about 1,000 words. He is not exhaustive when arguing for his point, but he is very precise and getting straight to the point with his argument. So you get Schreiner has made a very complex subject just a little less complex. No one should be fooled into thinking that he has dumb-downed very complex problems. That would not serve anyone and be helpful at the end of the day. Instead, Schreiner has taken very complex questions in bite-sized form. So each chapter is about 2-3 pages (most anyway) or about 1,000 words. He is not exhaustive when arguing for his point, but he is very precise and getting straight to the point with his argument. So you get the feeling that he has not said everything that could be said, but he has made his point and given his evidence. The question, then, is "Does Schreiner have enough space in each of his chapters to be persuasive?" For most scholars, that may be an issue, since wordiness and imprecision is common. But Schreiner is anything but wordy. He's very too the point and years of scholarship has probably given him the ability to sift through the dross of wondering comments. The end result is clear and persuasive answers to most (if not all) the questions most Christians have about the Law. The bonus feature to this book is that Schreiner is a pastor and preacher at heart, so he has a way of poking at his readers assumptions about the Bible and God.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wes Baker

    This is a decent, brief, readable treatment of the issue of the relationship of Christians and the Old Testament law. Schreiner's treatment struck me as somewhat inconsistent--or else he is splitting some very think hairs. Although he explicitly argues that the Old Testament law does not apply to Christians, he in places suggests that the moral principles contained in the law are still relevant. I wish he had been more direct in dealing with what appear to be some subtleties to his approach. Cer This is a decent, brief, readable treatment of the issue of the relationship of Christians and the Old Testament law. Schreiner's treatment struck me as somewhat inconsistent--or else he is splitting some very think hairs. Although he explicitly argues that the Old Testament law does not apply to Christians, he in places suggests that the moral principles contained in the law are still relevant. I wish he had been more direct in dealing with what appear to be some subtleties to his approach. Certainly he is clear in saying that adherence to the Old Testament law does not give us any merit for salvation. But my interest is on the moral principles that help inform a Christian's ethics and he was less clear on that point. Nonetheless, I found his discussion helpful and it helped prompt my thinking about the issue in some new ways. Bottom line: worth reading, but not a definitive and, in places, somewhat muddy, discussion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    God bless Tom Schreiner. Only can he somehow manage to survey, and respond to complicated issues like the New Perspective on Paul, Theonomy, Sabbatarianism, etc. in so few pages and manage to be clear, concise, and helpful. This book was incredibly helpful even though I found it often times making me uncomfortable in regards to how I view the Law in light of the new covenant. The man is truly a gift to the church; the perfect mix of scholastic excellence and pastoral clarity. (If you're reading God bless Tom Schreiner. Only can he somehow manage to survey, and respond to complicated issues like the New Perspective on Paul, Theonomy, Sabbatarianism, etc. in so few pages and manage to be clear, concise, and helpful. This book was incredibly helpful even though I found it often times making me uncomfortable in regards to how I view the Law in light of the new covenant. The man is truly a gift to the church; the perfect mix of scholastic excellence and pastoral clarity. (If you're reading this review sometime soon after it has been posted, please be praying for Dr. Schreiner's wife, Diane. She apparently was in an accident and, while showing very positive signs, is in need of prayer. Blessings.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Linkous

    I don't agree with Schreiner on everything, but I like this book a lot. He presents his view on Biblical Law and Paul in very nice sized portions. Sometimes they are still hard to read through. There isn't much prose, just information and research. Great summary of Schreiner's thought and introduction to issues of Paul and the Law. If a person adheres to Schreiner's views on the law, he will have a sure guide. Particularly interesting to me is Schreiner's chapter on the Sabbath and on tithing. I don't agree with Schreiner on everything, but I like this book a lot. He presents his view on Biblical Law and Paul in very nice sized portions. Sometimes they are still hard to read through. There isn't much prose, just information and research. Great summary of Schreiner's thought and introduction to issues of Paul and the Law. If a person adheres to Schreiner's views on the law, he will have a sure guide. Particularly interesting to me is Schreiner's chapter on the Sabbath and on tithing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Whittaker

    A really helpful book on how Christians relate to the law. Some chapters are a bit more complex and scholarly (particularly ones on justification and New Perspective) but others much more accessible. It answers clearly questions on purpose of the law, tithing, sabbath etc. The only downside of this book is that the nature of answering 40 questions in a shortish book means that some of the questions cried out for more space. But it's a good read. A really helpful book on how Christians relate to the law. Some chapters are a bit more complex and scholarly (particularly ones on justification and New Perspective) but others much more accessible. It answers clearly questions on purpose of the law, tithing, sabbath etc. The only downside of this book is that the nature of answering 40 questions in a shortish book means that some of the questions cried out for more space. But it's a good read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lee Button

    Here is the book of Bible answers on all aspects of the Mosiac Law. Is it the guiding principle for today in any form? How do the Gospels deal with the Law? Does Hebrews contradict other epistles? Did Jesus contradict Paul? Should Christians tithe? What about theonomy? In what way should the Law affect our preaching? Don't expect Schreiner to paint outside the lines of Scripture. His careful drawing of the biblical text is this book's greatest virtue. Here is the book of Bible answers on all aspects of the Mosiac Law. Is it the guiding principle for today in any form? How do the Gospels deal with the Law? Does Hebrews contradict other epistles? Did Jesus contradict Paul? Should Christians tithe? What about theonomy? In what way should the Law affect our preaching? Don't expect Schreiner to paint outside the lines of Scripture. His careful drawing of the biblical text is this book's greatest virtue.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dwight Davis

    This is a helpful overview for those with theological training who want to delve into the nature of the Law for Christians. Unless you have a basic knowledge of Biblical Greek and are fluent in modern theological terms, this book will make no sense to you. It is a helpful overview but doesn't go in depth on any issue. And I disagreed with some of Schreiner's conclusions. But the chapter on the New Perspective alone made the book worth my time. This is a helpful overview for those with theological training who want to delve into the nature of the Law for Christians. Unless you have a basic knowledge of Biblical Greek and are fluent in modern theological terms, this book will make no sense to you. It is a helpful overview but doesn't go in depth on any issue. And I disagreed with some of Schreiner's conclusions. But the chapter on the New Perspective alone made the book worth my time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Thank you Thomas Schreiner for another amazing book. In my humble opinion, everyone could benefit from this book. From a new christian who has little understanding of the law, to a trained pastor who is trying to be faithful to the scriptures and the gospel of Jesus Christ. This book digs down into important questions and it did not shy back from digging into the important passages of the Bible with faithful exegesis. Great book (and great series).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    With extensive scholarship and Scriptural clarity, Schreiner discusses the nature of biblical law and its relationship to Christians. By addressing 40 unique questions, Schreiner is able to keep each answer brief and self-contained, yet there are clear themes that emerge as the law is traced through the pages of God’s Word. Schreiner’s book is a powerful help to Christians, and is structured as to be straightforwardly read and digested. Without hesitation, this book is highly recommended.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josue Manriquez

    This book provides a good introduction to the relationship between Christians and biblical law. I wish I could give this 3.5 stars, but it won't let me. Nevertheless, this was a good read. Each of the 40 questions can easily take many pages—if not books—to adequately answer, but Schreiner keeps his answers short and concise. Some of his answers left me wanting more, yet he was kind enough to recommend other resources for further study. This book provides a good introduction to the relationship between Christians and biblical law. I wish I could give this 3.5 stars, but it won't let me. Nevertheless, this was a good read. Each of the 40 questions can easily take many pages—if not books—to adequately answer, but Schreiner keeps his answers short and concise. Some of his answers left me wanting more, yet he was kind enough to recommend other resources for further study.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    Great reference material! This will definitely help to clarify your thinking on exactly how the Law relates to the life of the Christian today. I found a lot of the chapters uninteresting as they tackled issues that I hadn't really encountered, but it was good to know that they were dealt with in case I ever need to refer back to them. Great reference material! This will definitely help to clarify your thinking on exactly how the Law relates to the life of the Christian today. I found a lot of the chapters uninteresting as they tackled issues that I hadn't really encountered, but it was good to know that they were dealt with in case I ever need to refer back to them.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    I'm liking Schreiner more and more.  This was a very helpful book.  It's clearly written, very focused and on point.  It's a great starting place for building a Biblical case for the role of the law in the life of the believer.   I'm liking Schreiner more and more.  This was a very helpful book.  It's clearly written, very focused and on point.  It's a great starting place for building a Biblical case for the role of the law in the life of the believer.  

  25. 4 out of 5

    Luís Alexandre Ribeiro Branco

    A really interesting analysis of the Law in the O.T. in comparing with the Grace in the N.T. I loved the analysis about tithing, it called my attention to new views of the topic and encouraged me to study a bit further.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    My brief review should appear in the fall 2011 edition of the Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Glyn Williams

    Well balanced perspective on the biggest and most important questions people have about the law today. A must read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Parkinson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Evans

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Peterson

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