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Home is the Sailor

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Sequel to Winds of Change/Eye of the Storm Royal Navy Series: Book Three The Royal Navy meets the Stately English Manor Murder Mystery, and if it were only a matter of Colonel Mustard in the library, things would be so much easier. After an ambush by the French while on a routine surveillance mission, Will Marshall and David Archer are advised to retreat to the English c Sequel to Winds of Change/Eye of the Storm Royal Navy Series: Book Three The Royal Navy meets the Stately English Manor Murder Mystery, and if it were only a matter of Colonel Mustard in the library, things would be so much easier. After an ambush by the French while on a routine surveillance mission, Will Marshall and David Archer are advised to retreat to the English countryside to avoid Bonaparte's animosity for a time. Upon their arrival, they discover that David's eldest brother has died after a mysterious accident and this puts his other, very unsuitable brother in line for the title. David's suspicions—that the new heir had a hand in his brother’s death—seem so unreasonable that even Will finds it difficult to believe his fears are valid. If Davy thought his lover was hard to convince, his autocratic father, who still sees him as the inept youngest son, won’t even listen to him. Davy and Will are thrust into the role of sleuths, trying to determine the truth behind the mystery. All the while Will has concerns of his own: his fear of losing Davy is still stronger than his desire to keep Davy beside him on the quarterdeck… but he knows no other life than the Navy. First Edition published by Cheyenne Publishing/Bristlecone Pine Press, 2010


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Sequel to Winds of Change/Eye of the Storm Royal Navy Series: Book Three The Royal Navy meets the Stately English Manor Murder Mystery, and if it were only a matter of Colonel Mustard in the library, things would be so much easier. After an ambush by the French while on a routine surveillance mission, Will Marshall and David Archer are advised to retreat to the English c Sequel to Winds of Change/Eye of the Storm Royal Navy Series: Book Three The Royal Navy meets the Stately English Manor Murder Mystery, and if it were only a matter of Colonel Mustard in the library, things would be so much easier. After an ambush by the French while on a routine surveillance mission, Will Marshall and David Archer are advised to retreat to the English countryside to avoid Bonaparte's animosity for a time. Upon their arrival, they discover that David's eldest brother has died after a mysterious accident and this puts his other, very unsuitable brother in line for the title. David's suspicions—that the new heir had a hand in his brother’s death—seem so unreasonable that even Will finds it difficult to believe his fears are valid. If Davy thought his lover was hard to convince, his autocratic father, who still sees him as the inept youngest son, won’t even listen to him. Davy and Will are thrust into the role of sleuths, trying to determine the truth behind the mystery. All the while Will has concerns of his own: his fear of losing Davy is still stronger than his desire to keep Davy beside him on the quarterdeck… but he knows no other life than the Navy. First Edition published by Cheyenne Publishing/Bristlecone Pine Press, 2010

30 review for Home is the Sailor

  1. 4 out of 5

    * A Reader Obsessed *

    4 Stars The final chapter of Will and Davey! Less an action packed seafaring adventure, this last installment finds Will and Davey on forced leave during “peacetime”, and they find themselves at Davey’s family estate for a visit. What neither expects is to find Davey’s eldest brother dead and the next brother in line for inheritance the main suspect. However, propriety and societal rules inhibit their incognito suppositions and investigations, but the truth must be discovered quickly as more people 4 Stars The final chapter of Will and Davey! Less an action packed seafaring adventure, this last installment finds Will and Davey on forced leave during “peacetime”, and they find themselves at Davey’s family estate for a visit. What neither expects is to find Davey’s eldest brother dead and the next brother in line for inheritance the main suspect. However, propriety and societal rules inhibit their incognito suppositions and investigations, but the truth must be discovered quickly as more people are endangered. It’s a race against time to find proof and the stakes are ratcheted up as the body count increases. Overall, a less emotionally taxing conclusion which I appreciated. Reassuringly, Will and Davey get their unexpected happy ending no matter how implausible and convenient! My only disappointment in this is that there's no epilogue! Damn!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meags

    3.5 Stars The final chapter in Lee Rowan’s Royal Navy series provided a satisfying ending for forbidden lovers Will Marshall and David Archer. Slow off the mark, this third instalment took a while to get going for me, but the increased pace and happenings of the second half were more than enough to win my overall enjoyment. More of a murder-mystery than the sea-faring adventures I was used to previously in this series, this story sees Will and Davy visiting Davy’s family’s estate, only to arrive t 3.5 Stars The final chapter in Lee Rowan’s Royal Navy series provided a satisfying ending for forbidden lovers Will Marshall and David Archer. Slow off the mark, this third instalment took a while to get going for me, but the increased pace and happenings of the second half were more than enough to win my overall enjoyment. More of a murder-mystery than the sea-faring adventures I was used to previously in this series, this story sees Will and Davy visiting Davy’s family’s estate, only to arrive to find Davy’s oldest brother and heir recently deceased by suspicious means and a household ridden by grief and confusion. It was obvious from the start who the “murderer” was but it was in the discovery of means and motives, and in the proving of his heinous actions, that the story held its strength. I liked meeting Davy’s big family and I liked seeing Will navigate his way through this unfamiliar upper-class environment, staying true and loyal to Davy always, playing protector and sounding board to all of Davy’s suspicions and worries. I could have done with more intimate moments between Davy and Will, but given the time period and the family filled estate setting, it was understandable that these men didn’t get too many precious moments to share in private without fear of discovery. I’m a bit unsure of my feelings on the way the story wrapped up but I understand that it was the most logical and acceptable way to finish the story if we were to believe a future was possible for these two adoring navy men. This series has been a pleasure to read and I’ll remember Will and Davy fondly as a favourite couple among the handful of M/M historical romances I’ve read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debra Guyette

    Book three in the Royal Navy Series finds our heroes, Will Marshall and David Archer, on retreat to escape the enmity of Bonaparte. Deciding to go to Davy’s home, they are surprised to find that Davy’s older brother and the heir has died under circumstances that David considers suspicious. The new heir is totally unsuited and will cause only problems for the family. But Davy cannot convince his father much less Will that there is more to the accident than appears. Soon the two are investigating Book three in the Royal Navy Series finds our heroes, Will Marshall and David Archer, on retreat to escape the enmity of Bonaparte. Deciding to go to Davy’s home, they are surprised to find that Davy’s older brother and the heir has died under circumstances that David considers suspicious. The new heir is totally unsuited and will cause only problems for the family. But Davy cannot convince his father much less Will that there is more to the accident than appears. Soon the two are investigating the changes to find the truth. Meanwhile Will still cannot reconcile having Davy by his side an also keeping him out of danger. Changes are coming for both men. Will and Davy will always have a special place in my heart. These two belong together, but must be careful because their love is not condoned under the law. They are brave, capable and competent young men. They have each other’s backs both professionally and personally. Will is having problems handling Davy in any further danger while Davy is having family problems. Can they resolve these issues? Only in the pages of the book will you find out. Read it and enjoy it. I know I did.

  4. 5 out of 5

    tacitus

    This fourth and final installment felt very labored and drawn out. I found myself skipping whole pages of pointless dialogue that added nothing to the story. I was also frustrated by the characters making constant dramatic illusions to terrible things the villain had done in the past, yet at no point actually telling us what those things were. The ending (I won't give it away) is just too perfect to be believable. In fact, I have seen this exact kind of ending in two other m/m books and I though This fourth and final installment felt very labored and drawn out. I found myself skipping whole pages of pointless dialogue that added nothing to the story. I was also frustrated by the characters making constant dramatic illusions to terrible things the villain had done in the past, yet at no point actually telling us what those things were. The ending (I won't give it away) is just too perfect to be believable. In fact, I have seen this exact kind of ending in two other m/m books and I thought they were ridiculous too. A Fairy Godmother might as well have dropped from the sky and waved a wand, it was so insipidly perfectly. PS: Why is that whenever women are brought into a m/m novel, in any capacity, they are either bad, stupid, or painfully boring? The female characters in this book served little to no purpose, and were either weak or downright irritating.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Plainbrownwrapper

    These books are sort of comfort reading for me. There's no explicit sex, there's not an excessive amount of angst, there's nothing all that wild and crazy in the plots. Just some good competent prose, nice romance, interesting naval settings, and plots that for the most part carry you along and keep you reading. In this book there was no mystery about the bad guy, only in how he was going to get caught. That's okay with me -- many "mystery" writers (e.g. Dick Francis) frequently do the same thing These books are sort of comfort reading for me. There's no explicit sex, there's not an excessive amount of angst, there's nothing all that wild and crazy in the plots. Just some good competent prose, nice romance, interesting naval settings, and plots that for the most part carry you along and keep you reading. In this book there was no mystery about the bad guy, only in how he was going to get caught. That's okay with me -- many "mystery" writers (e.g. Dick Francis) frequently do the same thing. I *was* a little annoyed that I could see the solution to the lovers' problems coming from a coupla miles off, and I frequently wanted to smack Will upside the head -- but, still, if Rowan publishes another book in this series, I'll be reading it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ReneeW

    3.5 stars/C+

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Ambroz

    Unsatisfying ending to the series. The detective part of the plot was simple, the murderer was made known from the begining by the author herself. The outcome of the romance plot wasn't resolved at all: Will didn't make his final decision about whether he would stay with David or he will return to the sea. The book would have benefited greatly from the epilogue. Unsatisfying ending to the series. The detective part of the plot was simple, the murderer was made known from the begining by the author herself. The outcome of the romance plot wasn't resolved at all: Will didn't make his final decision about whether he would stay with David or he will return to the sea. The book would have benefited greatly from the epilogue.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    Fun read... nothing too salacious, but an interesting take on two 19th C. gay men embroiled in a family crisis.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elisa Rolle

    At the fourth book in the series there is always the risk that the story becomes “ordinary”; actually for some readers this can be even a good point, many readers like to be familiar with the heroes, like to know a lot about their life and love. I think Lee Rowan did a trick with this novel to satisfy both types of reader. Home is the Sailor is again, and always, the story about Davy and Will, and as always, is the story about their forbidden love. This is a point Lee Rowan respected in all her At the fourth book in the series there is always the risk that the story becomes “ordinary”; actually for some readers this can be even a good point, many readers like to be familiar with the heroes, like to know a lot about their life and love. I think Lee Rowan did a trick with this novel to satisfy both types of reader. Home is the Sailor is again, and always, the story about Davy and Will, and as always, is the story about their forbidden love. This is a point Lee Rowan respected in all her novels about these men, and I think respected even according to the period in which this novel is set, beginning of the XIX century: very seldom Davy and Will allow their love to be freely expressed, and actually they are more the times they need to hide than when they can share a moment alone; strangely enough, the most daring places, like a riding carriage, is probably the place where they can be more safe, since no one would expect from them to do such things inside. But to renew the plot, Lee Rowan decided to shift the setting from the sea to the mainland: and actually in doing so, she not only adds novelty to the intercourse between Davy and Will, she also shifts the balance and brings back the reader to the very beginning of this series, when Davy and Will first met. In the course of the series, Will gained “strength” on Davy for his harsher experience, and also since he self-proclaimed himself Will’s protector. But actually Davy’s social status is a step, or maybe two or three, above Will, and when they need to go back to Davy’s family home, that void they filled up with their love, open again. Davy has responsibility that Will has not; Will can allow himself to be an unmarried old sea wolf, but Davy probably not. With the shift in setting there is also a little change in the subtheme; more or less the previous three books were romance/adventure stories, this last one instead have also a little bit of mystery in it. What I probably liked best, of this novel but also of all the series, is that the author allows to her heroes to be men in love, and so there is the romance, without taking decisions that are not realistic; even the end of this novel (probably not the end of Davy and Will’s adventures) is a mix of happiness and bittersweet feeling: true, Davy and Will will find a way to be together, but actually it’s not a totally pink perspective; the need of secrecy still lingers and Davy and Will have yet another little bickering right at the last page, so that the reader is enticed to search for a following story to know if they will find an agreement. http://www.amazon.com/dp/0982826702/?...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ambre

    The problems with long series' following couples are pretty universal. Good relationships are basically cyclical, dealing with the same things over and over, and not so interesting. Relationships with conflict aren't very romantic. This one falls in the middle. The problem is that the couple hasn't changed from book 1, so they see the same problems and react in the same way. It is just a repeat cycle. They haven't figured out how to talk to each other, or developed any security in their relation The problems with long series' following couples are pretty universal. Good relationships are basically cyclical, dealing with the same things over and over, and not so interesting. Relationships with conflict aren't very romantic. This one falls in the middle. The problem is that the couple hasn't changed from book 1, so they see the same problems and react in the same way. It is just a repeat cycle. They haven't figured out how to talk to each other, or developed any security in their relationship, or figured out a plan for the future. They still give up and predict doom and gloom rather than problem solving, and it is the same doom and gloom from the first 2 books. The main plot of this book was actually fairly well done as a kind of mystery/intrigue thing. But in the end it was an entire book about a family covering up the fact that one of its members was killing people. This might have been somewhat expected in the time, but I think someone like David would have at least felt some moral conflict about it. By the end, it was kind of like the author forgot that part, along with the people outside of the family who had been harmed. It was weird. I felt like she made David kind of overly resilient, just shedding emotional strife like it was nothing. I really prefer experiencing the normal pain and struggle people experience in life, rather than painting an overly happy picture.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katisha

    WARNING: Review contains Spoilers . . . . . . . . I enjoyed this tale of Will and Davy, though I found it less engaging than previous tales in the series (I could actually put this book down, and it lasted me nearly a week rather than just a day like the others in this series), probably because it is mostly set on land and the lads are thus at slightly less peril in pursuing their relationship. It has the feel of a detective novel rather than an historical romance, and whilst I enjoyed the unfolding of t WARNING: Review contains Spoilers . . . . . . . . I enjoyed this tale of Will and Davy, though I found it less engaging than previous tales in the series (I could actually put this book down, and it lasted me nearly a week rather than just a day like the others in this series), probably because it is mostly set on land and the lads are thus at slightly less peril in pursuing their relationship. It has the feel of a detective novel rather than an historical romance, and whilst I enjoyed the unfolding of the plot I was never uncertain of whodunnit or why. It was satisfying to see the culprit get his comeuppance, though. The book left me on a down, though, because the love story of Will and Davy pretty much gets resolved / shelved at the end of it. I think I sensed that from the start, given both the title and the comments the author has made elsewhere, and that may be why it took me 4 months to get around to reading it. I have adored the characters, and though it's nice to see them get their happy ending, I'm terribly sad that it means I won't get to read about them again. I'll miss waiting for 'the next exciting episode'.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erik Orrantia

    I loved this entire series. I always felt like I got an exceptional view of life for gays...before there was such thing. Aside from that, the story was imbedded in an enthralling adventure out at sea. To be honest, this was my least favorite of the four. Davy and Will return to land and mostly deal with an unlikely sequence of events. Just seemed less creative than the others, perhaps, and felt more like a mystery than an adventure or a gay romance. I am glad that I purchased it and I did enjoy I loved this entire series. I always felt like I got an exceptional view of life for gays...before there was such thing. Aside from that, the story was imbedded in an enthralling adventure out at sea. To be honest, this was my least favorite of the four. Davy and Will return to land and mostly deal with an unlikely sequence of events. Just seemed less creative than the others, perhaps, and felt more like a mystery than an adventure or a gay romance. I am glad that I purchased it and I did enjoy it though it was a definite change from the other three.

  13. 5 out of 5

    George Seaton

    Since I'm tasked with writing a review for "Home is the Sailor," for Out in Print, I'll forgo any review here. I'll add it as a link once it's published. I don't read this genre, and I didn't read the preceding three books in the series. So, my three star rating is probably reflective more of my tastes, than it is of the worth of this book. I suspect readers of this genre and specifically Rowan's Royal Navy series will adore "Home is the Sailor." Review here: http://blog.outinprint.net/2010/09/23 Since I'm tasked with writing a review for "Home is the Sailor," for Out in Print, I'll forgo any review here. I'll add it as a link once it's published. I don't read this genre, and I didn't read the preceding three books in the series. So, my three star rating is probably reflective more of my tastes, than it is of the worth of this book. I suspect readers of this genre and specifically Rowan's Royal Navy series will adore "Home is the Sailor." Review here: http://blog.outinprint.net/2010/09/23...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    I enjoyed seeing the heroes on their fourth adventure that took them to Davy's home. It gave insight into his background, but also provided a murder mystery and a vile villain. The interactions between Will and Davy were well written and I felt true empathy for their plight because the author spoke from both their perspectives. I enjoyed meeting some new characters and found myself chuckling over the surprise Davy's sister gave him at the end of the story. Can't wait to see what happens next. I enjoyed seeing the heroes on their fourth adventure that took them to Davy's home. It gave insight into his background, but also provided a murder mystery and a vile villain. The interactions between Will and Davy were well written and I felt true empathy for their plight because the author spoke from both their perspectives. I enjoyed meeting some new characters and found myself chuckling over the surprise Davy's sister gave him at the end of the story. Can't wait to see what happens next.

  15. 4 out of 5

    A.

    Liked this book for the fact it felt like a bit more of a departure from the Hornblower series and therefore more something its own. A good ending to the series that was realistic yet still mostly happy. Edit: Reread this again! It's interesting how this series has almost become like a comfort series, especially this particular book. Liked this book for the fact it felt like a bit more of a departure from the Hornblower series and therefore more something its own. A good ending to the series that was realistic yet still mostly happy. Edit: Reread this again! It's interesting how this series has almost become like a comfort series, especially this particular book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Theodora IK

    4.5 stars! Love the intrigue and the story, but the ending is more of a HFN. I found Will a little annoying because he just could not make his mind, but in other hand, I understood his feelings. The waiting for the next in this series will be a long one(2016!), but I am going to wait faithfully because I want these boys to get their HEA...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    I loved this, review coming soon

  18. 4 out of 5

    Max

    If this is the ending it feels incomplete. I really hope there is at least one more novel in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Nicoll

    A fabulous conclusion to a terrific series. It was great to spend more time with Will Marshall and David Archer. Highly recommended!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Perfect_sky

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana Mihalcea

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Mayhall

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aastha

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bls74

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lamar54

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