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Republic and the School: Horace Mann on the Education of Free Men

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First in the Classics in Education Series, this volume offers excerpts from Horace Mann's famous annual reports with an eye to their relevance to today's educational problems. "This series presents the sources of the American educational heritage. There could be no more appropriate beginning than a volume of selections from Horace Mann's reports (1834-1848) to the Massachus First in the Classics in Education Series, this volume offers excerpts from Horace Mann's famous annual reports with an eye to their relevance to today's educational problems. "This series presents the sources of the American educational heritage. There could be no more appropriate beginning than a volume of selections from Horace Mann's reports (1834-1848) to the Massachusetts Board of Education. As the commanding figure of the early public school movement, Mann more than anyone articulated the nineteenth-century American faith in education. His work still stands as the classic statement of the relationship between freedom, popular education, and republican government." --From the Foreword by Lawrence A. Cremin


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First in the Classics in Education Series, this volume offers excerpts from Horace Mann's famous annual reports with an eye to their relevance to today's educational problems. "This series presents the sources of the American educational heritage. There could be no more appropriate beginning than a volume of selections from Horace Mann's reports (1834-1848) to the Massachus First in the Classics in Education Series, this volume offers excerpts from Horace Mann's famous annual reports with an eye to their relevance to today's educational problems. "This series presents the sources of the American educational heritage. There could be no more appropriate beginning than a volume of selections from Horace Mann's reports (1834-1848) to the Massachusetts Board of Education. As the commanding figure of the early public school movement, Mann more than anyone articulated the nineteenth-century American faith in education. His work still stands as the classic statement of the relationship between freedom, popular education, and republican government." --From the Foreword by Lawrence A. Cremin

30 review for Republic and the School: Horace Mann on the Education of Free Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Horace Mann wrote in the mid 1800s, and it is interesting to see him address issues which are debated today – methods of teaching, teacher qualification, effects of poor education. It is also interesting reading his comments that are out-of-date or quaint. Worthwhile reading for this perspective.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LA

    One of the key educational reformers of the 19th century. Advocated group education settings, rather than private settings. He felt that education was the only way to pull the country into the current century and help it advance and compete with the European superpowers. One of the most interesting comments of the text is on pg. 55-56, where he talks about the relationship between the student and teacher and how it can become violent or abusive in either direction On pg. 63 in which he argues tha One of the key educational reformers of the 19th century. Advocated group education settings, rather than private settings. He felt that education was the only way to pull the country into the current century and help it advance and compete with the European superpowers. One of the most interesting comments of the text is on pg. 55-56, where he talks about the relationship between the student and teacher and how it can become violent or abusive in either direction On pg. 63 in which he argues that it is one of the basic and absolute rights of any man to have an education. On pg. 75 he states that to deny a child an education is more cruel and inhumane than infanticide of the worst kind that is practiced in Africa or China. He says that those who deny food to a child are guilty of murder, and likewise those who deny an education to a child are guilty of turning that kid into a miscreant who will become a terror to society. They will degrade the human race. On pg. 77, he says that if someone murders a baby, they are guilty before the eyes of the law the same as if they had killed a grown man or woman. However, why should we allow a child to live if we are not going to nurture that child and give him/her every opportunity to succeed? It would be better to let that kid die from starvation than to go without an education. "The natural life of an infant should be extinguished as soon as it is born or the means should be provided to save that child from becoming a curse to its possessor."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Absolutely wonderful background of the man (pun intended) who set the bar pretty damn high for America's education system. Clear and concise, you'll breeze through it, but everything you read will stick. Absolutely wonderful background of the man (pun intended) who set the bar pretty damn high for America's education system. Clear and concise, you'll breeze through it, but everything you read will stick.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

    Provides an interesting insight into the transformation of public education in the 1840's. Provides an interesting insight into the transformation of public education in the 1840's.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Establishes the American public school education platform of carefully neutered Christianity and implicit nationalism. Essential reading to understand where public education began in the 1840's. Establishes the American public school education platform of carefully neutered Christianity and implicit nationalism. Essential reading to understand where public education began in the 1840's.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lorianne

  7. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gabija

  10. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mr. MacConnell

  13. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hawkins

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed El Batran

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maksim Astashinskiy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Parsons

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mr. MacConnell

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  22. 5 out of 5

    G.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Bolanos

  24. 5 out of 5

    Frank

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert Harris

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  27. 5 out of 5

    Max

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sera

  30. 5 out of 5

    Justin

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