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The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World

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Invaluable tips and information make taking the plunge towards an extended vacation easier. Edward Hasbrouck, the Internet's best-known authority on international airfares and travel planning, provides guidance and advice for independent travel anywhere in the world. Get helpful information on airfare strategies, ticket discounts, and the inner workings of the airline rese Invaluable tips and information make taking the plunge towards an extended vacation easier. Edward Hasbrouck, the Internet's best-known authority on international airfares and travel planning, provides guidance and advice for independent travel anywhere in the world. Get helpful information on airfare strategies, ticket discounts, and the inner workings of the airline reservation system; tips on travel documents, border crossings, and entry requirements; guidance in choosing destinations, routes, and traveling companions; and find a global perspective that makes The Practical Nomad useful no matter where in the world your journey begins.


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Invaluable tips and information make taking the plunge towards an extended vacation easier. Edward Hasbrouck, the Internet's best-known authority on international airfares and travel planning, provides guidance and advice for independent travel anywhere in the world. Get helpful information on airfare strategies, ticket discounts, and the inner workings of the airline rese Invaluable tips and information make taking the plunge towards an extended vacation easier. Edward Hasbrouck, the Internet's best-known authority on international airfares and travel planning, provides guidance and advice for independent travel anywhere in the world. Get helpful information on airfare strategies, ticket discounts, and the inner workings of the airline reservation system; tips on travel documents, border crossings, and entry requirements; guidance in choosing destinations, routes, and traveling companions; and find a global perspective that makes The Practical Nomad useful no matter where in the world your journey begins.

30 review for The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    El

    No, I didn't just read 720 pages, calm down. I wouldn't normally rate a book I haven't read, but I have to mark the book as something in order to put it on a shelf and write a review, so being the completist I am, I feel it necessary to attribute a star rating as well. I was eager to get this book because I'm always looking for good travel tips and hints and I thought this would be filled with tips and hints. There's some okay stuff in here, but this is primarily for the non-traveled demographic. No, I didn't just read 720 pages, calm down. I wouldn't normally rate a book I haven't read, but I have to mark the book as something in order to put it on a shelf and write a review, so being the completist I am, I feel it necessary to attribute a star rating as well. I was eager to get this book because I'm always looking for good travel tips and hints and I thought this would be filled with tips and hints. There's some okay stuff in here, but this is primarily for the non-traveled demographic. Like the people who have never left their home. For those of us who have traveled, a lot of the information here is redundant and stuff that is totally easy to read on travel blogs on the internet. Which is what I already do. Additionally, there is a lot of information here, and I am not patient enough to sift through it all. I have skimmed every single page and read some of the more possibly-interesting sections, but again, a lot is common sense or so subjective that it's hard to apply all of it to your own experiences once you do travel. Travel is not one-size-fits-all, and I learned that the hard way when my boyfriend and I traveled with his brother and lady-friend several years ago. They couldn't handle our pace, which I knew going into it because I'm amazing and am well aware of people's weaknesses. But it was a learning experience, it had to be done, and now, no, no one can ever travel with us again. We're monsters on the road, that's how we like it. What was great for us was painful to them, vice versa. My idea of vacation doesn't involve sleeping all day in a hotel room in Florence, so while they did that one day, my boyfriend and I went to Siena and saw a bunch of stuff, and when we got back to the States and watched the James Bond movie Quantum of Solace we got to cheer in the theater "WE WERE JUST THERE OMG". Because that's the sort of assholes we are. The point is, the only way you'll know if you're a traveler is if you actually travel. It's not for everyone. If it's not for you, that's okay, don't force it. I think traveling is the best thing in the world and I like to do it any chance I can get. We prioritize and save pennies (literally) to make trips happen, even if it's only for six days. Which is what we're about to do. You can't tell from reading books if you're going to enjoy yourself. This is a fine resource (with a lengthy list of other resources at the back of the book, in case you still need more information that this 720 pages didn't provide), but it's just that: a resource. The best thing you can do is just do it, make it happen, don't talk yourself out of it. You don't have to be rich (which this book does a nice job of pointing out), you don't have to quit your job, you don't have to bog yourself down with reason after reason as for why you can't go anywhere. So this book is good for newbs at the travel scene, or for travelers who have very specific questions they want answered and, I dunno, the internet is down or something. This is not a sit-down-and-read-cover-to-cover sort of book (or I will call you a nerd if you do), but one to dip into now and again if, again, the internet is broken. Seriously, guys, you can get this stuff on the internet. The book also likes to say that you shouldn't just listen to your peers about places to go or things to do but I call bullshit on that. Is the author saying "Don't listen to your friends, but do listen to me?" Because there's a lot of personal experience stuff in here too, and I'm sorry, author-person, but I don't know you from Adam, so if the guy in our neighborhood with the beautiful Bernese Mountain Dog named Indy tells us to check a place out when we're in Switzerland, we're going to listen to him. (Okay, we actually didn't listen to him. I mean, we did, but we didn't make it where he recommended. But we took him seriously at least.) Yes, we do like to explore on our own, but if, for example, we hadn't asked my boyfriend's Corsican cousin about statue menhirs the last time we were in Corsica, we would have missed out on a few different sites that aren't as clearly labeled as Filitosa. One of those occasions involved tromping through cow patties, being chased by giant animals, and almost being swept away in the smallest creek ever, but that's my point - you can't get experiences like that by reading a book like this. The only way it happens is if you make it happen and allow it to happen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Page

    Pretty much the best, most practical, most complete travel book I've ever read (NO I didn't read every word of all 720 pages). Honest advice free from upcharges and commercial "info" websites. In my limited travel experience, it's been good so far.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josh Noles

    Good guide book for traveling. I'd suggest it for those new to travel too, not just those trying to travel around the world.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I read this book before a few months of backpacking in Europe. I thought it was pretty good. I followed a lot of its advice about how to avoid pickpockets, how best to carry and get access to money, etc. I am now reducing my rating to two starts. No offense to Mr. Hasbrouck, but his advice is total overkill for any but the most undeveloped of destinations. Like, backwoods Africa. There aren't a whole lot of places left in the world where you have NO ACCESS to an ATM for days. Don't bring $4000 ca I read this book before a few months of backpacking in Europe. I thought it was pretty good. I followed a lot of its advice about how to avoid pickpockets, how best to carry and get access to money, etc. I am now reducing my rating to two starts. No offense to Mr. Hasbrouck, but his advice is total overkill for any but the most undeveloped of destinations. Like, backwoods Africa. There aren't a whole lot of places left in the world where you have NO ACCESS to an ATM for days. Don't bring $4000 cash like he says. Bring $500 in travelers checks, and a couple ATM/credit cards. Don't have a seamstress make you a hidden pocket vest to wear under your shirt, or velcro your pockets. Just keep your wallet in your front pocket. And really... just buy your plane tickets from kayak.com and be done with it. Hasbrouck means well, and there's some good tidbits in here, but don't take it too literally or you'll be way overprepared. Just get on the plane, go, have fun.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    NOTE: this book is not an actual list of highlights, but a practical guide and bunch of tips about the logistics of traveling around the world on each continent, what to bring, what sort of transportation to use, when to hire a driver, where to expect trouble etc. I'm a very experienced traveler so I don't really need much handholding except it is good to know some of the red flags. Like where there are ongoing civil wars in Africa, for example! Maybe a holiday in Kashmir might not be such a goo NOTE: this book is not an actual list of highlights, but a practical guide and bunch of tips about the logistics of traveling around the world on each continent, what to bring, what sort of transportation to use, when to hire a driver, where to expect trouble etc. I'm a very experienced traveler so I don't really need much handholding except it is good to know some of the red flags. Like where there are ongoing civil wars in Africa, for example! Maybe a holiday in Kashmir might not be such a good idea either. I love the advice for people with jobs: just quit, you'll get a new one. How often do you get to go around the world?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was good in the manner of being well written and having a whole lot of resources, but it was bad if you were looking do anything less than quit your job and travel the world for 3 months to 1 year. I was hoping it would have more than it did have in it, but I wasn't too disappointed once I stopped looking for anything outside the kind of trip the book was aimed on selling on you. Amazing backend of resources though.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    Lots of great, practical information on traveling the world, especially the poorer countries. Nearly a bit overwhelming in detail, but absolutely worth looking through. A lot of commonsense stuff, practical details on how to make travel arrangements, and some valuable insights and hints (a vest with secret pockets sewn in, medical stuff). Potential to save a lot of money and grief.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I didn't read this book cover to cover; rather just read the chapters that were relevant. There was lots of useful info on travel planning techniques, and purchasing round-the-world type tickets. Initially I followed the authors advice and tried to go through a round-the-world travel agent to buy tickets, but ultimately found it was cheaper to buy the tickets on my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marcie

    This book was way too long with a ton of irrelevant and outdated information, especially for a book written (revised?) in 2007 by a travel agent. The book had some good information but unfortunately, Hasbrouck doesn't really make travel sound very fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tattered Cover Book Store

    Do you think you'll never be able to travel around the world for a year (or longer)? You are wrong! Hasbrouck will help you see your goals as realistic. The Practical Nomad is the most informative long-term travel planning aid I've ever encountered. Emily

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Valuable information on how - once you've arranged to get the time off - to get the best bang for your buck traveling around the world. Planning is everything...now if I could just stretch those 6 weeks to twelve!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lamadia

    This is a very useful book even for those who have traveled quite a bit. It's most helpful if you're planning on going to third world countries, but still had some good tips for the first and second world as well. It makes traveling around the world almost easy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    Good background reading with lots of practical tips. Too oriented toward the backpacker, but I suppose that's the author's target audience. Supposedly updated, but much is still out of date. More practical info on booking RTW fares with the airlines would help.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie Elwood

    This is more resource than read - it covers transportation information for traveling. Covered are such things as: whether you should purchase domestic flights while in the country or beforehand, what travel documents you might need, etc.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    A Excellent resource for the traveler, esp the one going to unusual places

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Blah, there were alt of good points in here but it was just to text book ish to read all the way through. I will pick it up again before I start my travels (maybe).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I highly recommend this for anyone who want to any kind of travel, especially long term.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Some good general advice but all-in-all, not very helpful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I've had wanderlust my entire life. What would it be to circumnavigate the globe? This is a wonderful source of information and resources for the would-be global traveler.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    He does a wonderful job with considerations, approaches, dealing with the practicalities of life on the road. Almost too much detail for me -- which isn't my normal issue.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annemarie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Celine Vialle

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Lancaster

  25. 4 out of 5

    Suzy Q

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roy W. Latham

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana Heme

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sayde

  29. 4 out of 5

    Femi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dbeckley

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