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In his magnificent classic, Chuck Colson shakes the church from its complacency with a penetrating look at the cost of being Christian. For those who have wondered whether there isn’t more to Christianity than what they have known—and for those who have never considered the question—Loving God points the way to faith’s cutting edge. Here is a compelling, probing look at th In his magnificent classic, Chuck Colson shakes the church from its complacency with a penetrating look at the cost of being Christian. For those who have wondered whether there isn’t more to Christianity than what they have known—and for those who have never considered the question—Loving God points the way to faith’s cutting edge. Here is a compelling, probing look at the cost of discipleship and the meaning of the first and greatest commandment—one that will strum a deeper, truer chord within even as it strips away the trappings of shallow, cultural Christianity. “Looking for the complete volume on Christian living? This is it. And the title sums it up. If you desire life deep, rich, and meaningful, then it is simply Loving God.” Joni Eareckson Tada President, Joni and Friends


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In his magnificent classic, Chuck Colson shakes the church from its complacency with a penetrating look at the cost of being Christian. For those who have wondered whether there isn’t more to Christianity than what they have known—and for those who have never considered the question—Loving God points the way to faith’s cutting edge. Here is a compelling, probing look at th In his magnificent classic, Chuck Colson shakes the church from its complacency with a penetrating look at the cost of being Christian. For those who have wondered whether there isn’t more to Christianity than what they have known—and for those who have never considered the question—Loving God points the way to faith’s cutting edge. Here is a compelling, probing look at the cost of discipleship and the meaning of the first and greatest commandment—one that will strum a deeper, truer chord within even as it strips away the trappings of shallow, cultural Christianity. “Looking for the complete volume on Christian living? This is it. And the title sums it up. If you desire life deep, rich, and meaningful, then it is simply Loving God.” Joni Eareckson Tada President, Joni and Friends

30 review for Loving God

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robin Wright

    Whenever it was that I read and so loved this book, I wrote the author a letter, and he wrote back saying that in his work there were some difficult times and that my letter greatly encouraged him and lifted his spirits. Wow!

  2. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is one of my favorite books, although it's very convicting. Charles Colson relies heavily on storytelling to make his points. These true stories are poignant, powerful, gripping. He tells them in sparse, conversational language that makes them all the more powerful. I think of Colson as a prophet. Like the Old Testament prophets, he is a proclaimer of truth. And as the Old Testament prophets preached primarily to the nation of Israel, Colson speaks primarily to the church. He calls for Christi This is one of my favorite books, although it's very convicting. Charles Colson relies heavily on storytelling to make his points. These true stories are poignant, powerful, gripping. He tells them in sparse, conversational language that makes them all the more powerful. I think of Colson as a prophet. Like the Old Testament prophets, he is a proclaimer of truth. And as the Old Testament prophets preached primarily to the nation of Israel, Colson speaks primarily to the church. He calls for Christians to be radical. "In a world where values are being shaped by the fleeting fantasies of secular humanism, it is radical to stand for the fundamental truth of God, to go to the 'root,' the Word of God," he writes. He calls for the church to get out of its comfort zone. "Too often ... the church's strategy for those who 'don't belong' is exactly backward," he writes. "Priority goes to constructing an attractive edifice in a location near a growing suburb and as far from crime-infested downtown as possible. Next come the committees organizing concerts, covered-dish suppers, Bible studies, slide shows, and the like. Then, with fresh welcome mat at the door, the members enthusiastically wait for all the lost and needy souls to come and join them. "Of course, they never do. ... The isolated church keeps evangelizing the same people over and over until its only mission finally is to entertain itself." This is not a book to read if you want to feel comfortable, especially if you are a Christian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is not a hard to read book. But for someone who grew up Christian like me, it is a refresher and a reminder of faith not as what I do, but why I do it. Somebody gave it to me as a gift when I was a freshman in college; I ignored it then and that's probably when I really needed it! Chuck Colson's style of writing is easy and inviting. It's not overly "dense" but it's very clear and concise. Many of the stories brought me to tears, and the examples that he uses of people who have taken the ste This is not a hard to read book. But for someone who grew up Christian like me, it is a refresher and a reminder of faith not as what I do, but why I do it. Somebody gave it to me as a gift when I was a freshman in college; I ignored it then and that's probably when I really needed it! Chuck Colson's style of writing is easy and inviting. It's not overly "dense" but it's very clear and concise. Many of the stories brought me to tears, and the examples that he uses of people who have taken the steps to come closer to loving God brought me to tears, because they're ordinary examples taken out of his life and his experiences.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carina Shephard

    Great book. Already want to re-read :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cliff

    In my book, Colson is one of the truly great men of the second half of the twentieth century. No other man accomplished as much, with as little fanfare, falling from the greatest heights to the lowest lows, only to find that the heights weren't so great and the lows weren't as bad as they were cracked up to be...if you understood what was REALLY high and what was REALLY low. Colson understands well that the height of his life was not by the side of the President in the eye of the public, but by In my book, Colson is one of the truly great men of the second half of the twentieth century. No other man accomplished as much, with as little fanfare, falling from the greatest heights to the lowest lows, only to find that the heights weren't so great and the lows weren't as bad as they were cracked up to be...if you understood what was REALLY high and what was REALLY low. Colson understands well that the height of his life was not by the side of the President in the eye of the public, but by the side of a hardened criminal,with only God as their witness. It is this understanding that makes him a truly great man. From a literary perspective, Colson doesn't do anything spectacular. It's a series of chapters that tell a series of stories that he's seen and heard in the first few years after starting his ministry in prison, (after being a prisoner himself for 7 months on an obstruction of justice charge during Watergate, FYI). But what is contained in the stories is truly moving. Not Hallmark movie moving, moving in the kind of way that the only way you can not be touched, or at least confused, is to deny the truth of the stories themselves. But they are true. One story toward the end of the book floored me especially. It seems that upon one of the first visits to Death Row Colson and some of his locals involved in his ministries, featured one person who refused to leave, even though the next meeting was with the Governor. Colson explained the situation, only to have the local explain to him, "But you see, I'm the Judge who sentenced this man to death. And we must pray together some more, I cannot go just yet." Colson immediately realized the Governor could wait. I was reminded of the end of another book I'd read, "Charlie Wilson's War." Dealing with the sort of Islamic extremism that the U.S. would face only a little over a decade later, the USSR lost less than 20,000 Soviets in a war that killed up to 2 Million Afganis. I was horrified, wondering, "How can anybody defeat an enemy who is willing to take those kinds of extreme losses?" But as I thought of Colson, his Judge friend, and his death row inmate, and prayer, I realized there are forces far, far more powerful than the kind of reckless hate you saw in Afghanistan. It's the same kind of force that caused Stephen to say, as his final words, "Lord, do not hold this sin against them." That fundamentally changes the rules of the game to something that cannot be won outside of Christ, and can only be won inside of him.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    Charles Colson has a fatherly, lawyerly manner that I find endearing. His style is logical, factual and academic. I read this title years ago. I remember it having a powerful impact. In particular, Colson's account of the Watergate conspiracy and the contrast between the Nixon administration's attempt to suppress the truth juxtaposed with the apostle's indefatigable testimony to Christ's resurrection has remained with me long beyond other points. I thought about reading it again when he passed a Charles Colson has a fatherly, lawyerly manner that I find endearing. His style is logical, factual and academic. I read this title years ago. I remember it having a powerful impact. In particular, Colson's account of the Watergate conspiracy and the contrast between the Nixon administration's attempt to suppress the truth juxtaposed with the apostle's indefatigable testimony to Christ's resurrection has remained with me long beyond other points. I thought about reading it again when he passed away, but haven't returned to these paths, yet. I have liked the quote that best summarizes the idea that stuck with me, and I'm copying it below as well. “I know the resurrection is a fact, and Watergate proved it to me. How? Because 12 men testified they had seen Jesus raised from the dead, then they proclaimed that truth for 40 years, never once denying it. Every one was beaten, tortured, stoned and put in prison. They would not have endured that if it weren't true. Watergate embroiled 12 of the most powerful men in the world-and they couldn't keep a lie for three weeks. You're telling me 12 apostles could keep a lie for 40 years? Absolutely impossible.” ― Charles W. Colson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a powerful book. It looks at the transforming power of love in its purest state: the sacrifice of Jesus Christ for the salvation of every person and the Word of God as justification. Told as a stories reinforced with Scriptural exegesis and essay, Colson digs down into how we can best love God using example after example of how he first loved us. Imagine being the doctor whose confession and testimony converted Solzhenitsyn and changed the world. Imagine being the crucified thief looking This is a powerful book. It looks at the transforming power of love in its purest state: the sacrifice of Jesus Christ for the salvation of every person and the Word of God as justification. Told as a stories reinforced with Scriptural exegesis and essay, Colson digs down into how we can best love God using example after example of how he first loved us. Imagine being the doctor whose confession and testimony converted Solzhenitsyn and changed the world. Imagine being the crucified thief looking into the eyes of Jesus Christ while the sun goes dark and the world is forever changed. Imagine being a 91 year old grandmother convinced she will die, in pain and alone, until the Lord tells her to write to the imprisoned, gaining a hundred new grandchildren and leading them out of bondage despite the fact that they remain behind bars. Imagine being a judge sentencing a murderer to death, then praying for him every day until you can pray with him, both of you finally knowing the peace that passes all understanding. This is a rare and powerful book and I hope everyone reads it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    My dad loved Chuck Colson's books, but I have never read one before. Although I was alive during the Watergate scandal, I don't remember it and the intrigue didn't interest me. (Chuck Colson was sent to prison over the Watergate scandal in Nixon's administration. His books tend to focus more on the hope that he found in prison - Jesus.) But, I picked up this book, not about Watergate, but thinking of my dad. I gave myself the summer to read it, but found I have finished it before my kids are even My dad loved Chuck Colson's books, but I have never read one before. Although I was alive during the Watergate scandal, I don't remember it and the intrigue didn't interest me. (Chuck Colson was sent to prison over the Watergate scandal in Nixon's administration. His books tend to focus more on the hope that he found in prison - Jesus.) But, I picked up this book, not about Watergate, but thinking of my dad. I gave myself the summer to read it, but found I have finished it before my kids are even out of school for the summer! I never realized before what a dramatic, engaging writer Chuck Colson was, and it made me wonder what I was missing with his other books. This book is not about Watergate, but more about everyday people who have lived extreme lives for Jesus. Each chapter had its own story and real people as characters. Some of the book reminded me of the type of stories that the Voice of the Martyrs publishes, but better written. (Some of the stories of the Voice of the Martyrs were rough translations or written by people who were not used to writing, but their stories were compelling because of their truth and the horrific situations faced.) Church Colson's stories were compelling and well-written. Most of them happened in ordinary, but hard circumstances. Some were horrific circumstances. Most were modern stories. I thought that the chapter "Watergate and the Resurrection" held Colson's interesting perspective. He said that he discovered that the Watergate conspirators could not hold their conspiracy together under scrutiny and threat of financial and legal troubles; he could not imagine the apostles holding a conspiracy of a false resurrection together, even when tortured and killed for their faith. I liked the story of Myrtie Howell in the "Life and Death" chapter best, and her encouraging, loving letter-writing ministry to prison inmates from a nursing home, when in her nineties. "Lord, You know what You want me to say. Now say it through me. ... So, now, Mr. Colson, you just keep remembering the Lord don't need no quitters." I have known and been blessed by such a person, a man who kept his joy in a nursing home, who considered it his ministry, and I saw the joy and delight he took in those who treated him there. And I thought, "What man, when moved to a nursing home, would pray for those who came to visit and encourage him?" So, maybe this chapter was special to me because I remember him. It is a sweet, gentle reminder not to grumble over my lighter troubles, but to be sweet until the end. "Knowing how susceptible we are to success' siren call, God does not allow us to see, and therefore glory in, what is done through us. The very nature of the obedience He demands is that it be given without regard to circumstances or results." This made me think of the teens I worked with at a former church. Sometimes I wonder what became of them - and pray. I may not know this side of heaven, what good, if any, was done there. This book, "Loving God," also reminded me of Kay Arthur's Bible study, "Loving God and Others." Except what she told in a verse-by-verse format, Chuck Colson showed with real-life, human examples. More Favorite Quotes: "Even in the ugliest of times and in the ugliest of circumstances, it is possible to love God and other people." "Self-fulfillment fads led to self-absorption and isolation, rather than the fuller, liberated lives they predicted." "But we will only be weak and stumbling believers and a crippled church unless and until we truly apply God's Word - that is, until we truly love Him and act on that love." "He chose the one experience in which I could not glory for His glory." "It is not what we do that matters, but what a sovereign God chooses to do through us. God doesn't want our success; He wants us. He doesn't demand our achievements; He demands our obedience." "Ye he [Boris Kornfeld] could not help praying them. Having seen his own evil heart, he had to pray for cleansing. And he had to pray to a God who had suffered, as he had: Jesus." "Having accepted the possibility of death, Boris Kornfeld was now free to live." "What God wants from His people is obedience, no matter what the circumstances, no matter how unknown the outcome." "For maturing faith - faith which deepens and grows as we live our Christian life - is not just knowledge, but knowledge acted upon." "The mind alone is no match for the seduction of evil pleasure" - Colson, paraphrasing Augustine "But in the garden he [Augustine] saw that the Scriptures were not just words to be interpreted; they were words that interpreted their reader." "For we should read God's Word not for what we can get out of it, not for what it will do for us, but for what it will teach us to do for our God." "Adding to scripture is as dangerous as taking away from it - and this perhaps was part of Eve's undoing." "For deep inside we know that obedience to the Scriptures without concern for consequences is penetrating and painful. It requires us to die to self and follow Christ. It demands that we recognize the sin in our lives and that we acknowledge and repent of that sin." "Without a continuing repentant attitude - a persistent desire to turn away from our own nature and seek God's nature - Christian growth is impossible." "One Christian leader, asked why he never mentioned repentance, smiled and replied, 'Get 'em first, let them see what Christianity is, and then they'll see their need to repent.' Tragically, this attitude pervades the church not only because we're afraid the truth will scare newcomers, but because it might also drive a number of the nodding regulars right out of their comfortable pews." "All our knowledge has not ushered in a brave new world. It has simply increased our ability to perpetrate evil." "If there is anything worse than our sin, it is our infinite capacity to rationalize it away. The Bible tells us this is a fearsome thing." "Psychiatry, properly administered, can turn a schizophrenic bank robber into a mentally healthy bank robber; a good teacher can turn an illiterate criminal into an educated criminal. But they are still bank robbers and criminals!" - an unnamed prison psychologist "We often end up obeying the rules rather than obeying God." "Our pious efforts can become ego-gratifying ... Such self-centered spirituality in turn leads to self-righteousness." "Sin is not simply the wrong we do our neighbor when we cheat him or the wrong we do ourselves when we abuse our bodies. Sin, all sin, is a root rebellion and offense against God, what R. C. Sproul calls 'cosmic treason.'" "We must understand that our goal as believers is to seek what we can do to please God, not what He can do for us. Personal victories may come but they are a result, not the object. True Christian maturity - holiness sanctification - is God-centered." "I put my faith in the God of the Bible, not the God I had made up in my head." "The picture of Me that you make in your own mind so that you feel complacent and secure is idolatry." - Bill Bontrager, paraphrasing Amos. "Obedience to God does not always mean a happy ending. But why should we think it would?" "History has shown that when society embraces religion, religion usually hugs back. Accommodation is often followed by assimilation and amalgamation." If Christianity were false, "do you think I would prefer you not to try and tell me?" "I hate this business where Christians always feel obliged to be encouraging." Dictionary: "metanoia" - repent, from meta (change) and noia (mind.) "Cheap grace," - Christianity without cost, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, German martyr "political illusion" - the misguided belief that all problems can be solved by structures, namely institutions, Jacques Ellul, French historian "instant pudding religion" - where someone turns to Jesus and their lives suddenly get better rather than continue to have struggles as most of us do, David Chapman, business man.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Susan Weiner

    This was an inspiring look at a religious conversion that changed the life of one powerful man. Colson, aide to Nixon, went to prison in the Watergate scandal. His resulting conversion to Christianity changed the whole of his life and that of the many prisoners who benefited from his Prison Ministry that came about after he was released. Colson was a good man and an inspiring one. His faith and words are touching. I felt I am a better Christian for having read this book. Highly recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brittany McDowell

    A must read for every believer!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Tse

    Colson started out with a survey asking people what it means for them to love God. People said attend church, tithe, etc. but didn't remember that Jesus said to love God means to obey. Colson gave many examples of believers who lived it out and explained concretely how that will look in our lives. I'm very inspired by how the Agape house was started. This book is definitely inspiring and motivating to read. I especially liked the last 2 chapters about a faithful grandma living in a convalescent Colson started out with a survey asking people what it means for them to love God. People said attend church, tithe, etc. but didn't remember that Jesus said to love God means to obey. Colson gave many examples of believers who lived it out and explained concretely how that will look in our lives. I'm very inspired by how the Agape house was started. This book is definitely inspiring and motivating to read. I especially liked the last 2 chapters about a faithful grandma living in a convalescent home and the struggles we often face between obeying God's words and the world's values. It is a bit disturbing reading about the condition of prisons, because it is so similar to the movie Shawshank Redemption. I thought the movie was a bit fictional, but reading this chapter opened my eyes to the reality of prison condition. I could not put down the book until I finished reading these last 2 chapters, because it was that good. Ended up sleeping at 12:30pm instead of 11:30pm, so don't read this if you are planning to go to bed soon. Haha.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Carol

    Through personal accounts, stories we know well, and stories we have never encountered Charles Colson brings poignant illustrations about how we are to love God to life. Some of his points I knew well through growing up in the church; however, this book brought those points, and others, into a clearer perspective than I've ever had. I have struggled with how to love God. How could I love the One engough, considering how much He loves me. I didn't know how I could draw closer to Him. This book br Through personal accounts, stories we know well, and stories we have never encountered Charles Colson brings poignant illustrations about how we are to love God to life. Some of his points I knew well through growing up in the church; however, this book brought those points, and others, into a clearer perspective than I've ever had. I have struggled with how to love God. How could I love the One engough, considering how much He loves me. I didn't know how I could draw closer to Him. This book brought convinction and clarity to those questions. This quote really sums up what the book discusses and the main point to take away: "To believe, to repent, to obey, to be holy, to bind up the broken hearted, and to serve" is how we truly love God. Obedience in prayer and reading the Bible is what begins our path to loving God, following His path for our lives, and making a difference in lives around us.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dayo Adewoye

    A marvelous book! It got me thinking about what it really means to be a Christian. Colson expounds, with the aid of strikingly illustrative stories,on key doctrines of the Christian worldview such as: the authority of the Bible, the meaning and nature of sin, the necessity of conversion,and a life of holiness. And he powerfully applies these to the conscience, thus compelling anyone who confesses the name of Christ to get up and be a Christian.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Cova

    My sister Cheri gave me this book years ago (like 10 or 15, I think) and I was recently (finally) drawn to it. This was written post Watergate, post prison, post starting his prison evangelism ministry and it was insightful how so many of the ills still plague our nation and church today as he discussed when it was written ('81 I think?). I strongly recommend this, and am excited to read more Colson. My sister Cheri gave me this book years ago (like 10 or 15, I think) and I was recently (finally) drawn to it. This was written post Watergate, post prison, post starting his prison evangelism ministry and it was insightful how so many of the ills still plague our nation and church today as he discussed when it was written ('81 I think?). I strongly recommend this, and am excited to read more Colson.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    This book is very deep, I am reading it slowly , taking my time , I have to have no distractions while I read, because it is packed with Gods truths life applications , just loaded with good bible truths, I am enjoying it .

  16. 4 out of 5

    Quincy Cheuk

    Very encouraging! With stories of people that live a life similar to myself, it feels much more relevant to me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    The title gives a big hint as to what this book is all about. Loving God is the prerequisite to a Christian life of faith and all of the spiritual gifts that come with it. Colson speaks of his own conversion, and others' faith journeys, and how all of their lives did not become meaningful until they were ready to commit to their faith in a loving relationship with God. Colson is quickly becoming one of my heroes. I read another of his books, How Ought We to Live, and found that equally inspiring. The title gives a big hint as to what this book is all about. Loving God is the prerequisite to a Christian life of faith and all of the spiritual gifts that come with it. Colson speaks of his own conversion, and others' faith journeys, and how all of their lives did not become meaningful until they were ready to commit to their faith in a loving relationship with God. Colson is quickly becoming one of my heroes. I read another of his books, How Ought We to Live, and found that equally inspiring. While only a layman, his knowledge and command of theology is authoritative. What more, as a layman Colson meets his audience face to face. Not talking down as a minister to a congregant, but as sinner who has been there also and truly understands the struggle first hand. If you only ever read one book about the Christian life, read something Colson wrote!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    Really good book. Given that I usually read a lot of deep theological texts, this has been a very refreshing read. It was very down to earth, relatable, and applicable. I didn't really expect it to still be this good after this many years... especially due to the kind of quality of popular Christian bestsellers aren't usually that great. The book does not go into many of the same faults that the "evangelical" books do at the time, maybe due to Sproul's influence on Colson. I appreciate the care g Really good book. Given that I usually read a lot of deep theological texts, this has been a very refreshing read. It was very down to earth, relatable, and applicable. I didn't really expect it to still be this good after this many years... especially due to the kind of quality of popular Christian bestsellers aren't usually that great. The book does not go into many of the same faults that the "evangelical" books do at the time, maybe due to Sproul's influence on Colson. I appreciate the care given to what true conversion is-- more than just mental assent or a sinners' prayer. The only quip I have with this book is the oversimplified ecclesiology in Chapter 18, but that's not really the point of the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Massanutten Regional Library

    Joy, Central patron, August 2019, 5 stars: Came across this at a used book sale. Great read. It was published in 1982, close enough to Watergate that the few stories shared about it were fresh and emotional. Exciting stories of faith and struggle shared in this book. The Hanoi Hilton church in the infamous POW camp was highlighted in one chapter. Amazing how God strengthens those that give themselves fully to Him no matter their circumstances. Great chapter on Micky Cohen, the mobster and Billy G Joy, Central patron, August 2019, 5 stars: Came across this at a used book sale. Great read. It was published in 1982, close enough to Watergate that the few stories shared about it were fresh and emotional. Exciting stories of faith and struggle shared in this book. The Hanoi Hilton church in the infamous POW camp was highlighted in one chapter. Amazing how God strengthens those that give themselves fully to Him no matter their circumstances. Great chapter on Micky Cohen, the mobster and Billy Graham. Really great read. A keeper!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Read for JHU project. This book was unexpectedly engrossing in how it used biographical anecdotes to illustrate what loving God really consists of: obedience, service, acknowledging one's sin, and listening. The author recounts how his own "disgrace" in going to prison for his role in the Watergate coverup actually brought him a fulfilling relationship with God and a drive to promote the prison ministries to bring hope to many in need. PopSugar Reading Challenge 2019: A book with "love" in the ti Read for JHU project. This book was unexpectedly engrossing in how it used biographical anecdotes to illustrate what loving God really consists of: obedience, service, acknowledging one's sin, and listening. The author recounts how his own "disgrace" in going to prison for his role in the Watergate coverup actually brought him a fulfilling relationship with God and a drive to promote the prison ministries to bring hope to many in need. PopSugar Reading Challenge 2019: A book with "love" in the title

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim Layman

    Charles Colson wrote this book ten years after his ignoble fall from power and post-Watergate imprisonment. It’s a good read, full of vignettes of men and women who have chosen to love and obey God and serve others. The story of Dr. Kornfeld is especially gripping to me. The best thing about people is that they are never too bad to be redeemed by God. Colson brings that out in the pages of this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I haven't reread this in a long time. But it was a wonderful life. He is able to say so much in a sentence. And make sense of so many things, in a sentence. Unlike others who go on and on without saying much of anything. When life is hard, when things don't make sense and you need to make sense of it - this is a good book to read. I haven't reread this in a long time. But it was a wonderful life. He is able to say so much in a sentence. And make sense of so many things, in a sentence. Unlike others who go on and on without saying much of anything. When life is hard, when things don't make sense and you need to make sense of it - this is a good book to read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Peggie

    This is a classic, older but very appropriate to read or re-read in today's charged social climate. Colson issues a clear, but positive challenge to Christians to put their faith to work in the world around them, being a force for justice and mercy in our neighbors' needs. After this, my first time through this book, I was very inspired and motivated to be more useful to the world. This is a classic, older but very appropriate to read or re-read in today's charged social climate. Colson issues a clear, but positive challenge to Christians to put their faith to work in the world around them, being a force for justice and mercy in our neighbors' needs. After this, my first time through this book, I was very inspired and motivated to be more useful to the world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Love is spelled OBEY To be a Christian means obeying when it is not popular, even dangerous. However, this is the path to not only loving God, but experiencing love and meaning in life. True stories illustrate the costs and the rewards. Everyone should read it and reflect deeply.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Cooper

    Great real-life examples of loving God and the cost of loving God in this life. Definitely sets your mind on our home in heaven. I found it to be a little too preachy at times. I think the writer could have made his points without sounding pushy. Otherwise, I love the living examples of people who have forsaken much to do what God told them to do.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    An enjoyable book about loving my Lord and Savior. There was lots of good information that was given through true stories. :)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Harriette

    Filled with memorable true stories to drive home the point that loving God involves obeying him no matter what the cost.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    Wonderful.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Daughety

    Very practical read on how to love God. The format switching between stories and discussion makes it easy and interesting to read. I highly recommend!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Wambogo

    I love the way he gives examples that are easy to relate with

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