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Poetry. THE SINGING KNIVES, originally published in 1971 by Broughton's Mill Mountain Press, is Frank Sanford's first collection of poetry. Reprinted by his own press, Lost Roads Publisher, after his death, THE SINGING KNIVES, debuts the work of a twenty-something year old boy way ahead of his time and in a state of unrest, capturing "poetry's more primal and mysterious po Poetry. THE SINGING KNIVES, originally published in 1971 by Broughton's Mill Mountain Press, is Frank Sanford's first collection of poetry. Reprinted by his own press, Lost Roads Publisher, after his death, THE SINGING KNIVES, debuts the work of a twenty-something year old boy way ahead of his time and in a state of unrest, capturing "poetry's more primal and mysterious possibilities"-David Clewell. "It is astonishing to me that I was not even aware of this superbly accomplished and moving poet. There is a great deal of pain in the poems, but it is a pain that makes sense, a tragic pain whose meaning rises from the way the poems are so firmly molded and formed from within"- James Wright.


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Poetry. THE SINGING KNIVES, originally published in 1971 by Broughton's Mill Mountain Press, is Frank Sanford's first collection of poetry. Reprinted by his own press, Lost Roads Publisher, after his death, THE SINGING KNIVES, debuts the work of a twenty-something year old boy way ahead of his time and in a state of unrest, capturing "poetry's more primal and mysterious po Poetry. THE SINGING KNIVES, originally published in 1971 by Broughton's Mill Mountain Press, is Frank Sanford's first collection of poetry. Reprinted by his own press, Lost Roads Publisher, after his death, THE SINGING KNIVES, debuts the work of a twenty-something year old boy way ahead of his time and in a state of unrest, capturing "poetry's more primal and mysterious possibilities"-David Clewell. "It is astonishing to me that I was not even aware of this superbly accomplished and moving poet. There is a great deal of pain in the poems, but it is a pain that makes sense, a tragic pain whose meaning rises from the way the poems are so firmly molded and formed from within"- James Wright.

30 review for Singing Knives (Poetry Series No 18)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Jesus Christ. Why didn't someone tell me to read him before this? He's the Cormac McCarthy of verse. Now I must read everything. Jesus Christ. Why didn't someone tell me to read him before this? He's the Cormac McCarthy of verse. Now I must read everything.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Aldridge

    Frank Stanford is the man I would be if I had shot myself three times in the heart. He destroys me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doctor Bliss

    Extrañísimo pero vívido poemario. Frank Stanford describe bizarros eventos de su ambiente, rural, de pueblo, pero llega a parecer circense o hasta de sueños. Las imágenes son espectaculares y difíciles de olvidar. En uno de sus poemas, el más largo y último del libro, describe cómo un borracho se corta su mano usando una motosierra, y bromea que pensó que era una guitarra. Seguidamente el protagonista, un ser tal vez aún más extraño, la usa para orinar, le habla, la pone junto a una foto de Elvi Extrañísimo pero vívido poemario. Frank Stanford describe bizarros eventos de su ambiente, rural, de pueblo, pero llega a parecer circense o hasta de sueños. Las imágenes son espectaculares y difíciles de olvidar. En uno de sus poemas, el más largo y último del libro, describe cómo un borracho se corta su mano usando una motosierra, y bromea que pensó que era una guitarra. Seguidamente el protagonista, un ser tal vez aún más extraño, la usa para orinar, le habla, la pone junto a una foto de Elvis, saluda con ella a los pescadores y finalmente, cuando las moscas molestan demasiado, la guarda en el ahumador. Todo esto, de entrada insensanto e imposible, lo describe de forma hermosa, armoniosa y con un sentido de normalidad que nos hace cuestionarnos si realmente pasó. Es difícil explicarlo, mejor léanlo

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bjorn Sorensen

    Concise, brutal and intense. Stanford fits a blunt, straightforward style perfectly with the details of a backwoods life of violent revenge. The poems take on a hallucinatory nature, when the scariest of dreamworld language is in fact real life, where zero rule of law is the law of the land. The poems embody an edgy honesty coming from a writer who shot himself in the head three times in committing suicide at age 30. One of the most indelible poems, "WISHING MY WIFE HAD ONE LEG": Caryatid with ey Concise, brutal and intense. Stanford fits a blunt, straightforward style perfectly with the details of a backwoods life of violent revenge. The poems take on a hallucinatory nature, when the scariest of dreamworld language is in fact real life, where zero rule of law is the law of the land. The poems embody an edgy honesty coming from a writer who shot himself in the head three times in committing suicide at age 30. One of the most indelible poems, "WISHING MY WIFE HAD ONE LEG": Caryatid with eyes of nails always being driven with thighs of a canoe and of horses fighting with the back of nine maidens drowning Caryatid with the hair of a flag raised in battle with the thoughts of a severed member and of orphans sleeping with nipples of amethyst on lifted chalices Caryatid with the neck of a bow drawn towards the forest with the sex of a ship coming about and of a wing in a bamboo cage with the voice of a silent chisel Caryatid with the heart of a feather What is particularly heartbreaking is the way Stanford combines the most horrific acts of violence with the most tender potential of human beings, here exemplified by the joining of "thoughts of a severed member" with "nipples of amethyst on lifted chalices." Stanford combines the most rugged language - Chainsaw / The man cut his hand off at dawn / I heard him yell / I set up in bed / He ran past the window / "Don't let the dog get it" he said (from the last poem, the epic "SNAKE DOCTORS") - with more sophisticated references: "dancing teachers weeping in their offices; / toads with bellies as quiet / as girls asleep in mansions, dreaming (from "Transcendence of Janus"). Like poet Larry Levis, Stanford returns to the same themes, images and characters throughout the 63-page book as if it were all one poem broken up with heavy pauses. The stark language lends itself to an apocalyptic aura. The feeling I got from the book is that the truth is so painful that only people close to death can ever be totally honest.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    3.5 stars "Oh sweet Jesus the levees that break in my heart" Highlights: 'The Nocturnal Ships of the Past' 'The Picture Show Next Door to the Stamp Store in Downtown Memphis' The Minnow If I press on its head, the eyes will come out like stars. The ripples it makes can move the moon. 3.5 stars "Oh sweet Jesus the levees that break in my heart" Highlights: 'The Nocturnal Ships of the Past' 'The Picture Show Next Door to the Stamp Store in Downtown Memphis' The Minnow If I press on its head, the eyes will come out like stars. The ripples it makes can move the moon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hugh

    I'm really glad this is back in print. I'm really glad this is back in print.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andy Lagerstrom

    Gorgeously disturbed Southern Gothic poetry. This collection is much better and makes more sense as a collection than The Light the Dead See, even though they have several of the same poems.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sean A.

    wowz. frank u killed yrself and u kill me for those moments when i am reading u. and yet it is the most strangely pleasurable form of death. a death beneath the dead toenails of lorca or vallejo swimming downriver with crawfish in the arkansas river. all those times the rolling stones collectively listened to black blues music while taking some sort of drug just can't compare to any of your poems. i've been to eureka springs where you lived and it's a whacky tourist town in the ozarks it's kindo wowz. frank u killed yrself and u kill me for those moments when i am reading u. and yet it is the most strangely pleasurable form of death. a death beneath the dead toenails of lorca or vallejo swimming downriver with crawfish in the arkansas river. all those times the rolling stones collectively listened to black blues music while taking some sort of drug just can't compare to any of your poems. i've been to eureka springs where you lived and it's a whacky tourist town in the ozarks it's kindof hard to imagine all yr deaths in the woods just outside of that town, but i'll take your word for it. there was that one time my partner and i went to a winery there and were served by a woman with a "destroy everything" tattoo on her left arm. she said if her husband touched a certain kind of her wine, she would punch him in the head. so there's that...

  9. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie Tozan

    Beautiful and haunting; this collection leaves your spine chilled, images flashing, with a need to return to nature, whether or not it is a full return or a night's walk. Stanford reminds of the need to stay fresh in writing, with a shift approximately halfway through that takes us from humanistic relationships to humans relating to nature. Imagistic and heartfelt and a much-read-again. This book needs to make it to my shelves as soon as possible. Beautiful and haunting; this collection leaves your spine chilled, images flashing, with a need to return to nature, whether or not it is a full return or a night's walk. Stanford reminds of the need to stay fresh in writing, with a shift approximately halfway through that takes us from humanistic relationships to humans relating to nature. Imagistic and heartfelt and a much-read-again. This book needs to make it to my shelves as soon as possible.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maddelyn

    Knives, fire, blood, boats, the moon. Pleasantly violent characters and matter-of-fact prose lines. A South all of its own... The dogs woke me up I looked out the window Jimmy ran down the road With the knife in his mouth He was naked And the moon Was a dead man floating down the river --from "The Singing Knives" Favorites: "The Nocturnal Ships of the Past," "Belladonna" Knives, fire, blood, boats, the moon. Pleasantly violent characters and matter-of-fact prose lines. A South all of its own... The dogs woke me up I looked out the window Jimmy ran down the road With the knife in his mouth He was naked And the moon Was a dead man floating down the river --from "The Singing Knives" Favorites: "The Nocturnal Ships of the Past," "Belladonna"

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charlie O'Hay

    One never feels entirely safe in a Stanford poem, as they don't stray far from the blade. His images, rooted in the Deep South, and are filled with scars, buried secrets, and haunted dreams. Brilliant writing that cuts to the bone. One never feels entirely safe in a Stanford poem, as they don't stray far from the blade. His images, rooted in the Deep South, and are filled with scars, buried secrets, and haunted dreams. Brilliant writing that cuts to the bone.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carmelo Valone

    Inside this little poetry book holds Frank Stanford's first collection of poetry. Roughly for me, I happen to believe that these poems are mostly about the dare I say it, the beauty of violence and those surreal, oddball-ish long, dark and yep weird nights. Inside this little poetry book holds Frank Stanford's first collection of poetry. Roughly for me, I happen to believe that these poems are mostly about the dare I say it, the beauty of violence and those surreal, oddball-ish long, dark and yep weird nights.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thai Son

    Great stuff, but not to my taste much. My personal favorite would be Narcissus to Achilles. Much less graphic and condensed than the rest.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joe Romano

    "I saw the snake doctors riding each other." "I saw the snake doctors riding each other."

  15. 5 out of 5

    J. A.

    What a wonderful first book for Frank. One of my favorite poets and the book is well worth the read for any fans of poetry.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cindy John

    "Oh Sweet Jesus the levees that break my heart" "Oh Sweet Jesus the levees that break my heart"

  17. 4 out of 5

    Guion Pratt

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ashburn

  19. 5 out of 5

    anya

  20. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sam Mills

  23. 5 out of 5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wilone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gabe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Horatio Kitsmiller

  29. 5 out of 5

    Corey Bowen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alex

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