counter create hit The Waterborn - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Waterborn

Availability: Ready to download

The River flowed through all the land, deep and unstoppable, a god in his own right. His head was in the mountains; his arms embraced the outlands; his body lay at the core of all the civilized realms; and his legs stretched on to the distant sea. Dark and sluggish, he rolled unchallenged, dreaming his own invincible might and glory into stark reality. Everywhere he touched The River flowed through all the land, deep and unstoppable, a god in his own right. His head was in the mountains; his arms embraced the outlands; his body lay at the core of all the civilized realms; and his legs stretched on to the distant sea. Dark and sluggish, he rolled unchallenged, dreaming his own invincible might and glory into stark reality. Everywhere he touched, the River God held dominion. And in Nhol, the fabled city at the heart of the world, an emperor ruled as the living aspect of the god, presiding over the splendors and intrigues of a prosperous land and a glittering court. Hezhi was an imperial princess; her blood carried the seeds of the River's power. When her favorite cousin disappeared, Hezhi searched throughout the sumptuous palace with its ghosts and priests, giants and courtiers, and frightening creatures of wizardry. And the magic within her began to grow; soon it must attract dangerous attention. Hezhi's anxious quest ripened into a desperate fight for her own life--a battle she could not hope to win alone. Small wonder that the princess wished for a hero. And far away, a hero's journey began...


Compare
Ads Banner

The River flowed through all the land, deep and unstoppable, a god in his own right. His head was in the mountains; his arms embraced the outlands; his body lay at the core of all the civilized realms; and his legs stretched on to the distant sea. Dark and sluggish, he rolled unchallenged, dreaming his own invincible might and glory into stark reality. Everywhere he touched The River flowed through all the land, deep and unstoppable, a god in his own right. His head was in the mountains; his arms embraced the outlands; his body lay at the core of all the civilized realms; and his legs stretched on to the distant sea. Dark and sluggish, he rolled unchallenged, dreaming his own invincible might and glory into stark reality. Everywhere he touched, the River God held dominion. And in Nhol, the fabled city at the heart of the world, an emperor ruled as the living aspect of the god, presiding over the splendors and intrigues of a prosperous land and a glittering court. Hezhi was an imperial princess; her blood carried the seeds of the River's power. When her favorite cousin disappeared, Hezhi searched throughout the sumptuous palace with its ghosts and priests, giants and courtiers, and frightening creatures of wizardry. And the magic within her began to grow; soon it must attract dangerous attention. Hezhi's anxious quest ripened into a desperate fight for her own life--a battle she could not hope to win alone. Small wonder that the princess wished for a hero. And far away, a hero's journey began...

30 review for The Waterborn

  1. 5 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    I was introduced to Greg Keyes' work by the magnificent 'Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone' series. 'The Waterborn' was his first published novel, which I sought out after finishing those. It's not as polished as 'Kingdoms..' but it feels like the same author, also doing high fantasy. It's got some close-to-stock characters, but it's also intriguing, with appealing drama and a world with convincingly different cultures interacting. It parallels the story of Hezhi [a sheltered, isolated princess coming o I was introduced to Greg Keyes' work by the magnificent 'Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone' series. 'The Waterborn' was his first published novel, which I sought out after finishing those. It's not as polished as 'Kingdoms..' but it feels like the same author, also doing high fantasy. It's got some close-to-stock characters, but it's also intriguing, with appealing drama and a world with convincingly different cultures interacting. It parallels the story of Hezhi [a sheltered, isolated princess coming of age in a family with strange powers] with the story of Perkar [a young cattle-herder who is selected for a mission to try to gain his tribe more pasture lands.] Gods and spirits entwine themselves with their destiny, and it's got some interesting commentary on what it means to be a hero, or a princess. Well-crafted and structured, I'd recommend the book. I'd still recommend 'Kingdoms' first, but I'd recommend this one as well. I initially read the book in 2011, but I've just found out that it's being re-released as an eBook by Open Road Media, so it'll be easier to find than it has been - which is a good thing!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    **I got this from Netgalley***I was not entirely sure about this going in. Princess....Hero...a journey. It sounds like all the other fantasy novels out there. I resigned myself and began to read and to read and to read. I discovered a well written, well thought out solid fantasy story. And better yet, I could not put it down. I was taken away. I loved the world the author created, and I liked the characters and I enjoyed the journey. Don't let the silly cover scare you away. It was a most enjoy **I got this from Netgalley***I was not entirely sure about this going in. Princess....Hero...a journey. It sounds like all the other fantasy novels out there. I resigned myself and began to read and to read and to read. I discovered a well written, well thought out solid fantasy story. And better yet, I could not put it down. I was taken away. I loved the world the author created, and I liked the characters and I enjoyed the journey. Don't let the silly cover scare you away. It was a most enjoyable read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jan Pospíšil

    Waterborn is a gem, possibly plucked out of another bizarro dimension and very roughly shaped by a novice who didn't quite know what he was doing, but who managed to strike and polish exactly where needed. Oxymoronical? Impossible? Especially compared to Keyes's other books like the Briar King etc. saga, Waterborn is a very fresh and quick read. Storylines don't drag, characters don't have time to bore me. And while the whole plot setup is quite archetypal, as the characters seem to be, the sett Waterborn is a gem, possibly plucked out of another bizarro dimension and very roughly shaped by a novice who didn't quite know what he was doing, but who managed to strike and polish exactly where needed. Oxymoronical? Impossible? Especially compared to Keyes's other books like the Briar King etc. saga, Waterborn is a very fresh and quick read. Storylines don't drag, characters don't have time to bore me. And while the whole plot setup is quite archetypal, as the characters seem to be, the setting feels fresh and new in a way I can't quite describe (or understand). Keyes showed me a new fantasy which was old at the same time, one which rang true and solid. Only when I started reading the Briar King series, I learnt of his interest and research into etymology and linguistics. But even before, while reading The Waterborn and The Blackgod, I somehow knew. I recognized aspects of his writing style similar to Tolkien's, there was something clicking with my own interests. I noticed some readers found the book unpolished, they recognized it was the author's first. Some felt the characters were flat and the story too simplistic. To me it's almost a perfect blend of familiar and surprising. Overall a very pleasant read. There really should be a roleplaying game set in this world, I sure would love to play that!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Femmy

    I remember enjoying this book when I read it a few years back, in part because it doesn't take place in a quasi-medieval-European setting like so many fantasy novels, so I recommended it to my husband. He liked it, too, and bought the second novel in this duology, The Blackgod. As I’ve already forgotten most of the plot, I reread The Waterborn before continuing to the second book. Well, the second time around wasn’t as magical as the first time. The story takes a while to really take off. Nothing I remember enjoying this book when I read it a few years back, in part because it doesn't take place in a quasi-medieval-European setting like so many fantasy novels, so I recommended it to my husband. He liked it, too, and bought the second novel in this duology, The Blackgod. As I’ve already forgotten most of the plot, I reread The Waterborn before continuing to the second book. Well, the second time around wasn’t as magical as the first time. The story takes a while to really take off. Nothing really happens in the first hundred of pages or so and it didn't help that I had a hard time liking the two main characters, at least at first. The first protagonist is Hezhi, a princess in the city of Nhol, located near the mouth of the River. Her mission is to find her cousin, so she goes down to the submerged tunnels beneath the palace and spends time in the library to research things that might help her in her task. She's an okay character, I guess, but it just seems to me that the fantasy genre is filled with wayward princesses who shun all things princess-y and want to be warriors or scholars, or sneak around in the hidden passages in their castles. I've seen these types before. Ho-hum. The second protagonist is Perkar, a villager in the Cattle Lands, near the head of the River. He's completely infatuated with the river goddess, giving him some foolish notion about "rescuing" her from the River god. So his mission is to kill the evil god, with little regard for anything else, including his friends. Not at all a likable character. Fortunately, the story gets better into the second part of the book. Hezhi's research in the library reveals some mysterious information about the royal family and the River god and it is somehow connected to her cousin's disappearance. Very interesting. A romantic interest also emerges. Meanwhile, Perkar learns his lesson about the way of the gods, gains some maturity and becomes less annoying. By the end of the book, I was rooting for both of them. I'm starting the second book now, and it looks very promising!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sheldon

    I found myself very conflicted about this book. At first glance, it would appear to be a standard fantasy novel, with the farm boy who goes on a journey to be a hero, and princess in distress, and an incredibly powerful enemy that must be overcome. However, things are not what they appear to be. The "hero" turns out to have little to no idea what he's doing, nor does he have some set or prophesied destiny to fulfill. In fact, several other characters comment consistently about how stupid and unw I found myself very conflicted about this book. At first glance, it would appear to be a standard fantasy novel, with the farm boy who goes on a journey to be a hero, and princess in distress, and an incredibly powerful enemy that must be overcome. However, things are not what they appear to be. The "hero" turns out to have little to no idea what he's doing, nor does he have some set or prophesied destiny to fulfill. In fact, several other characters comment consistently about how stupid and unwise he behaves. The princess in distress is actually very intelligent and inquisitive with a latent power in all members of her family that make her more dangerous than anyone else. And the true nature of the gods makes the reader question what is really going on. There's an ancient secret about the Rivergod and his enemies, and the characters are realizing that they may simply be pawns in a game of the gods. Keyes creates an incredibly interesting world, where gods exist in everything, from the field of grass, to the streams that cut the land, to the very campfires that the characters gather around, all the way to the great Rivergod which consumes all other gods around him. The characters are quite dynamic and change and learn during the course of the story in this book and it's sequel, "The Blackgod." However, the reason I can only gives this novel three stars is because it is painfully obvious that this was Keyes first book. Some of the prose and the dialogue feel rather clumsy, and certain aspects that seemed like they were supposed to be mysteries became painfully obvious much earlier than the actual reveal. Which leaves me very torn. If Keyes had waited longer in his career before he wrote this book and its sequel, I feel that it would have turned out much, much better. Still, it is very worth the read if you can look past it being a freshman effort that turns the standard high fantasy fare on its head (much like how George R.R. Martin's Song of Fire and Ice series challenges the low fantasy genre). Fascinating, but far from perfect.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Red Haircrow

    The beauty of this tale is in it's searching quality. The hero is young, has heady ideals of what he wants to do with his life and which direction to take but not quite how to get there or behave. And there's an invisible line of fate drawing him forward to a meeting with a young princess who needs rescuing. Keyes books are immersive, and this one is no different. If you allow yourself you can sink into these waters and characters smoothly. World building and realization is also strong. I love fa The beauty of this tale is in it's searching quality. The hero is young, has heady ideals of what he wants to do with his life and which direction to take but not quite how to get there or behave. And there's an invisible line of fate drawing him forward to a meeting with a young princess who needs rescuing. Keyes books are immersive, and this one is no different. If you allow yourself you can sink into these waters and characters smoothly. World building and realization is also strong. I love fantasy. Love it absolutely. I love when a writer has such a power vision as J. Gregory ably displays in this first book in the Children of Changeling series. He presents this world as he wishes it to be. One can either accept that or leave it behind. I chose to accept it without complaint or second-guessing his view to suit my own and I am fully glad I did. Excellent novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This book was amazing, for those who don't a little polytheism thrown into the mix. Great story of a boys journey to become a man and help his people, reccomend the sequel too.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Just reread this--it's still terrific. Please ignore the hokey cover. A quest fantasy that isn't based on Lord of the Rings and its zillion offspring. It's got a hero, an enchanted sword, a heroine in jeopardy, but from there on out the novel takes its own path. The best part is all the gods, inhabiting just about everything, some friendly, some indifferent, some hostile. It feels like this is really how people used to view the world. I also liked the hero's realization that he hadn't been noble Just reread this--it's still terrific. Please ignore the hokey cover. A quest fantasy that isn't based on Lord of the Rings and its zillion offspring. It's got a hero, an enchanted sword, a heroine in jeopardy, but from there on out the novel takes its own path. The best part is all the gods, inhabiting just about everything, some friendly, some indifferent, some hostile. It feels like this is really how people used to view the world. I also liked the hero's realization that he hadn't been noble and brave -- just stupid and deluded. Now he's stuck on an impossible quest and just wants to go home.

  9. 5 out of 5

    S.B. Santiago

    This was the first Fantasy novel I ever picked up. After reading his books, I didn't want to read anyone else. He is a great author. If you are looking for a really great novel try this one, and The Black God.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michaela

    It took me a while to get into the story, bud then I was even surprised how good the book become to be. Good story about brave young princess and boy, who tries to do his best but always turns out to do the right opposite.

  11. 5 out of 5

    lézengő reader

    Good idea, good characters and well-built world but the plot could have been a little less simple. Still I prefer simple to stupid, so am looking forward to reading the sequel.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Darrington

    Nobody knows about or will every read this book which is sad cause it's good.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shane Duquette

    One of the best fantasy books I've ever written. So much so that I bought every single of Keyes' other books. The novel explores different types of historical religions clashing against one another. (The gods are real.) All of it feels real, because all of it lines up with old myths and histories. This makes sense, because it's written by a mythologist and anthropologist. We have the animist religions among the hunter-gatherer tribes, with many gods of varying motivations and powers. The son of a One of the best fantasy books I've ever written. So much so that I bought every single of Keyes' other books. The novel explores different types of historical religions clashing against one another. (The gods are real.) All of it feels real, because all of it lines up with old myths and histories. This makes sense, because it's written by a mythologist and anthropologist. We have the animist religions among the hunter-gatherer tribes, with many gods of varying motivations and powers. The son of a chieftain falls in love with his local deity and decides to kill the god who is hurting her. And on the other side of the world, we have a monotheistic religion with a massively powerful god. The Emperor of that kingdom really has been chosen by this god, and the god sends a prophet into the world to do his bidding. We follow the son of the chieftain and the young prophet, both of which I thoroughly enjoyed reading about.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    I'm off to the store to buy Blackgod! At heart, an unforgettable fantasy replete with all the requisite elements - a pretty damsel in distress, heroes and their sagas, gods, battles, good and evil, with lots of credible dialogue to bring it home! Did I mention a couple of plot twists that would make the most jaded thriller or mystery reader's eyes light up? At a deeper level, Keyes also addresses issues such as the relationship of man to his gods in a belief system similar to the Greek and Roman p I'm off to the store to buy Blackgod! At heart, an unforgettable fantasy replete with all the requisite elements - a pretty damsel in distress, heroes and their sagas, gods, battles, good and evil, with lots of credible dialogue to bring it home! Did I mention a couple of plot twists that would make the most jaded thriller or mystery reader's eyes light up? At a deeper level, Keyes also addresses issues such as the relationship of man to his gods in a belief system similar to the Greek and Roman pantheon of mortal gods and half-gods with emotions and motivations that are all too human. He also seems openly critical of a priesthood that has misinterpreted its role in society and as a result has misappropriated and abused the power that history accorded it. Religious and racial intolerance also make cameo appearances. But, all the while, Keyes never forgets that he is telling a story - and, it's one you won't be forgetting for a long time to come! Paul Weiss

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hans van der Veeke

    I read this book some years ago and the only thing I remembered was that it was a good story. Rereading this, I am not disappointed. I like the tale of the eastern, Egypt-like princes Hezhi and the western barbarian Perkar, destined to get together. Not really fantasy, more like Egyptian and Celtic stories with gods in every 'thing' which gives it a special flavor. The story is well paced and interesting. And exciting enough to keep in reading. Four stars earned and I am looking forward to the n I read this book some years ago and the only thing I remembered was that it was a good story. Rereading this, I am not disappointed. I like the tale of the eastern, Egypt-like princes Hezhi and the western barbarian Perkar, destined to get together. Not really fantasy, more like Egyptian and Celtic stories with gods in every 'thing' which gives it a special flavor. The story is well paced and interesting. And exciting enough to keep in reading. Four stars earned and I am looking forward to the next book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Summer Seeds

    It started off slow. I almost gave up on it, honestly. Then, about a quarter of the way through, the pace started to pick up and I actually started to like the story. There was a lot of world building and set up (I assume) for the second book. I bounced back and forth about what to give this first novel. In the end I would probably give it something like 3.5 stars. It way OKAY, but, after all was said and done, not a lot actually happened.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Arabi-Katbi

    Amazing world building: check Cultural immersion: check Strong and deep characters: check Character development: check Reminds me of Inuyasha a bit: check ;) Lollll. Yes so dang, I really enjoyed this and the followup book which I'll review in a bit (will be similar to this one). This first book concentrated on our main male and female characters with a different perspective in each chapter. it was amazing to see the world from such different points of view and it really help build it up. One of my f Amazing world building: check Cultural immersion: check Strong and deep characters: check Character development: check Reminds me of Inuyasha a bit: check ;) Lollll. Yes so dang, I really enjoyed this and the followup book which I'll review in a bit (will be similar to this one). This first book concentrated on our main male and female characters with a different perspective in each chapter. it was amazing to see the world from such different points of view and it really help build it up. One of my favorite quotes came from chapter three, YES chapter 3! "He crowed aloud, a great raven war whoop, and the curious cows in the pasture around Perkar turned briefly to accuse him with their mild cow-eyes of disturbing their deep meditations. Perkar disregarded them. He had a sword." Loved that writing style. Humor, illustrative language, and lots of emotional expression. YES

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christine Cox

    Epic Adventure I’ve read and re-read this book and it’s sequel three times now. The character development and world building is as wonderful as some of most popular epic fantasy novels. The main characters are endearing and the story itself is riveting. These two books are one of my most favorite fantasy reads. Highly recommended.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hans Åge Martinsen

    An original The storyline in it self is not original, but how it is told and how the different aspects in the book is combined are. Looking forward to read the continuation of this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    3/5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    It wasn't as good as I remembered, but still an awesome read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    You can see this review as well as other fantasy book reviews on my blog, My Life as a Bookworm Not sure what I expected from this fantasy book but it wasn't a high fantasy story that is filled with Gods and Goddesses and a whole bunch of world building. Keyes is an amazing storywriter. I was blown away by the descriptions and the emotions throughout this book. The story bounces back and forth between Hezhi a 12 year old princess living in isolation in a castle and a 17 year old barbarian named Pe You can see this review as well as other fantasy book reviews on my blog, My Life as a Bookworm Not sure what I expected from this fantasy book but it wasn't a high fantasy story that is filled with Gods and Goddesses and a whole bunch of world building. Keyes is an amazing storywriter. I was blown away by the descriptions and the emotions throughout this book. The story bounces back and forth between Hezhi a 12 year old princess living in isolation in a castle and a 17 year old barbarian named Perkar who fell in love with a stream Goddess. There are some other POVs between the chapters but they are short and adds to the story because it leaves you in suspense. Writing this review is sorta hard just because there is so much going on and I would HATE to give it all away but I will try. :/ Hezhi is a VERY young princess when her favorite cousin is taken away never to be seen again. This starts her obsession with finding out what happened to him. She knows it has to do with her Royal Blood but she is not sure what. Her bloodline can be traced back to the River himself who is a God but a slumbering one. She starts working in the library to find out more but when summoned to court she is required to drink from the River and there she wishes for a hero to save her. That is where Perkar comes in. Perkar is a barbarian from far away who lives by codes and honor. He honors all the Gods around him and falls in love with the stream Goddess near his family home. He promises her that he will free her from the River. His quest starts out as a journey to the Forest Lord to ask for more land for his people but then turns deadly. His bad decisions changes the course of everything and he is pushed toward Hezhi's wish of a hero to come save her. I was surprised at how young Hezhi was being portrayed but she acted more like a teenager than a young girl but things happened to make her grow up faster. She is strong-willed and will do whatever it takes to learn more and to escape her fate. I really liked and connected with her even though she was so young while Perkar I just wanted to bash his head into a rock. He was being stupid and proud and not thinking straight. He made such bad decisions but again I guess without making those bad decisions he wouldn't have gotten to where he needs to go. It was frustrating at times. The world building was awesome and the history of the Gods and Goddesses were just enthralling. Everything was very descriptive although it does take a while for the story to really start it was a good story. I couldn't put it down.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Stares

    New ebook release! I received a copy of this book from Netgalley for review. Premise: Perkar lives in a land full of gods: the little gods of things, the gods of places, the bigger gods of the old places that bargained with his ancestors. Hezhi lives in a city with one god. The River controls the city, controls the priesthood, controls the rules that govern Hezhi’s royal blood. They each set forth to change their fate, and so may change the fate of many more. I really liked this. It’s been a dece New ebook release! I received a copy of this book from Netgalley for review. Premise: Perkar lives in a land full of gods: the little gods of things, the gods of places, the bigger gods of the old places that bargained with his ancestors. Hezhi lives in a city with one god. The River controls the city, controls the priesthood, controls the rules that govern Hezhi’s royal blood. They each set forth to change their fate, and so may change the fate of many more. I really liked this. It’s been a decent while since I’ve read such a strong fantasy novel. It’s long without dragging, although if it were written today, it would probably be broken up into two books. Both Perkar and Hezhi’s societies are explored carefully, and the differences are stark. I want this book to be a movie or a miniseries. Casting it would make some people’s heads explode. You see, it features a young man who loves a stream-goddess and does many foolish things for that love, and then has to face the consequences. It features a girl who seeks knowledge and truth above all else after her cousin disappears. He lives in a ‘barbarian’ land where honor and combat is prized, and young men are expected to have a household and a herd. She lives in a huge palace in a vast city where class mobility is miniscule and the power of the royal family is above all. The herdsmen of the hills are explicitly light-skinned, while the city people are dark. Hezhi is probably the most powerful character, and she is a young girl of color. Awesome. Perkar and Hezhi are tied together by fate, by the gods who take an interest in their lives, and by their own struggles to understand and survive what destiny has in store. They are both interesting, flawed characters who come into kinds of power, and have to figure out how to handle that. It’s not perfect, and the plot does meander occasionally, but the world is really interesting and the characters compelling. That’s most of what I’m looking for in a novel, and I’ll probably read the sequel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    The story was interesting and I loved the young protagonist. The set up of this world was interesting and I liked the story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    A Reader's Heaven

    (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Hezhi is a princess, daughter of a royal family whose line was founded by the god known as the River. Her blood is not only royal, it is magic, with a power that will not become known until she approaches adulthood. As she grows into her gift, she will take her place in court—or be judged unworthy and cast into the darkness below the palace. When Hezhi's cousin D'en is kidnapped by the priests and taken below, (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Hezhi is a princess, daughter of a royal family whose line was founded by the god known as the River. Her blood is not only royal, it is magic, with a power that will not become known until she approaches adulthood. As she grows into her gift, she will take her place in court—or be judged unworthy and cast into the darkness below the palace. When Hezhi's cousin D'en is kidnapped by the priests and taken below, Hezhi vows to rescue him. But he is trapped in the domain of the River, and she will need a hero to help her find her way in the dark. Perhaps that hero is Perkar, a barbarian who has fallen in love with the goddess of the stream. When the River threatens to destroy Perkar's love, he embarks on a quest that will take him to Hezhi's side to do battle with a god. This was a really hard book for me to get into. I do enjoy a good fantasy series and I thought this may have been a pretty good place to start (I did enjoy 'The Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone'a decade or so ago.) However, for some reason, this just didn't grab me the same way. I think the biggest problem for me was that, to get myself interested (and invested) in a series, it has to start off well - the first few hundred pages were pretty dull as we learned about the life in Hezhi's village. That about sums up the majority of the first book. It was hard to get into. I understand world-building...but I also understand plot (and the need for things to happen!) The worst part is that it is actually really well written. Keyes understands the basic fantasy tropes, he adds a dash of high fantasy, a dab of mythology (his own creation, of course) and demonstates that he "gets" fantasy fiction. I just wished he had moved the plot along a little faster. Not sure if I will follow up with the second book. Paul ARH

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kiro Selanor

    Good fantasy book. Not an elf to be seen. Has interesting ideas about gods (there are *lots* of them in this world); this is to be expected as the author has an academic degree in anthropology and mythology. At one point Perkar obtains a talking sword, and their dialogues sometimes evoked Zelazny.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    An interesting and creative first volume of the fantasy epic. It does have a few "first volume" problems, however. First off, despite the apparent level of action going on, the entire book is really only exposition/set-up for future volumes. It's a bit iffy to get 2/3 of the way through the book and realize that a) very little of significance has actually occurred, and b) very little of significance is actually going to occur for the rest of the book. Yes, the 2 lead characters are put on their p An interesting and creative first volume of the fantasy epic. It does have a few "first volume" problems, however. First off, despite the apparent level of action going on, the entire book is really only exposition/set-up for future volumes. It's a bit iffy to get 2/3 of the way through the book and realize that a) very little of significance has actually occurred, and b) very little of significance is actually going to occur for the rest of the book. Yes, the 2 lead characters are put on their path...but it takes the entire book to do so. That said, Keyes has created a very interesting world, and does some fun conceptual things with it. It's very rare for a fantasy novel to treat interaction with the gods on such an everyday sort of basis and even rarer for it to actually work. I'm intrigued enough to read the next volume if it crosses my path, but I'm not clamoring to seek it out. There's a reason this book took me such a staggeringly long time to both start and get through, so while I liked it well enough in the end (I bounce back & forth between 2 & 3 stars on this one) many other books on the "to-read" shelf are going to jump ahead.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Casey Wheeler

    I received a republication copy of this book (April 28, 2015) through NetGalley with the understanding that I would publish are review on my blog, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google + pages along with NetGalley, Amazon and Goodreads. I requested this book because I am interested in fantasy . This is the second book I have read by the author Greg Keyes. I will give you my overall impressions of the book without giving away too many of the details of the book. I hate it when I start to read a r I received a republication copy of this book (April 28, 2015) through NetGalley with the understanding that I would publish are review on my blog, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google + pages along with NetGalley, Amazon and Goodreads. I requested this book because I am interested in fantasy . This is the second book I have read by the author Greg Keyes. I will give you my overall impressions of the book without giving away too many of the details of the book. I hate it when I start to read a review that reveals the whole story line (I stop and don't go any further at that point). This is book one of the Changeling series and lays the groundwork for the principal characters in the book. It contains all of the essential elements in a good fantasy novel and it makes it an interesting and fast read. The characters are well developed and there are plot twists that are surprising. Based on the title, the reader can assume that the plot line involves water in some form. I recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in fantasy novels.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A story that is full of gods, ghosts and magic including mischief. The Changeling is the river god of the city Nhol. There are no other gods nearby as the Changeling has driven off all the other gods. He is part of the blood of the royal family in Nhol. When Princess Hezi becomes a teenager, she will be tested by the priests, after which she will move into the royal apartments or vanish as her cousin did. Why did he disappear? Meanwhile Perkar comes of age and falls in love with a stream goddess A story that is full of gods, ghosts and magic including mischief. The Changeling is the river god of the city Nhol. There are no other gods nearby as the Changeling has driven off all the other gods. He is part of the blood of the royal family in Nhol. When Princess Hezi becomes a teenager, she will be tested by the priests, after which she will move into the royal apartments or vanish as her cousin did. Why did he disappear? Meanwhile Perkar comes of age and falls in love with a stream goddess who is afraid of the river god devouring her wand wants Perkar to destroy the Changeling. Will he succeed? Will he meet Princess Hezi? This is an amazing fantasy novel that I could not stop reading. The two main characters unravel mysteries. The story tackles issues of values and identity. the Waterborn is a very satisfying read. Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book free from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I was not obliged to write a favorable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kasey Cocoa

    I fell in love with this book the more I read it. I can honestly say this is a gem in the fantasy genre. The writing is solid and intelligently devised with no glaring grammatical issues. I feel the plot is just this side of original with enough of a fresh take that it feels unique. The same can be said for the characters who while at first feel familiar take on a fresh feel with depth and well layered personalities. They are easy to connect with and to feel that emotional tug as you are along f I fell in love with this book the more I read it. I can honestly say this is a gem in the fantasy genre. The writing is solid and intelligently devised with no glaring grammatical issues. I feel the plot is just this side of original with enough of a fresh take that it feels unique. The same can be said for the characters who while at first feel familiar take on a fresh feel with depth and well layered personalities. They are easy to connect with and to feel that emotional tug as you are along for their journey. The world comes to life around the characters in a refreshingly detailed way. After reading this I thought back over the experience looking for anything I didn't like. I didn't find anything so I can give this all five stars with ease. Overall this is a very enjoyable fantasy read I can easily recommend to everyone. I received an e-arc through Open Road Media in exchange for an honest review. This in no way influenced my opinion which may or may not mirror your own - and that's perfectly fine with me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.