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There is a dark king who rules our dreams from a place of shadows and fantastic things. He is Morpheus, the lord of story. Older than humankind itself, he inhabits -- along with Destiny, Death, Destruction, Desire, Despair, and Delirium, his Endless sisters and brothers -- the realm of human consciousness. His powers are myth and nightmare -- inspirations, pleasures, and p There is a dark king who rules our dreams from a place of shadows and fantastic things. He is Morpheus, the lord of story. Older than humankind itself, he inhabits -- along with Destiny, Death, Destruction, Desire, Despair, and Delirium, his Endless sisters and brothers -- the realm of human consciousness. His powers are myth and nightmare -- inspirations, pleasures, and punishments manifested beneath the blanketing mist of sleep. Surrender to him now. A stunning collection of visions, wonders, horrors, hallucinations, and revelations from Clive Barker, Barbara Hambly, Tad Williams, Gene Wolfe, Nancy A. Collins, and sixteen other incomparable dreamers -- inspired by the groundbreaking, bestselling graphic novel phenomenon by Neil Gaiman.


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There is a dark king who rules our dreams from a place of shadows and fantastic things. He is Morpheus, the lord of story. Older than humankind itself, he inhabits -- along with Destiny, Death, Destruction, Desire, Despair, and Delirium, his Endless sisters and brothers -- the realm of human consciousness. His powers are myth and nightmare -- inspirations, pleasures, and p There is a dark king who rules our dreams from a place of shadows and fantastic things. He is Morpheus, the lord of story. Older than humankind itself, he inhabits -- along with Destiny, Death, Destruction, Desire, Despair, and Delirium, his Endless sisters and brothers -- the realm of human consciousness. His powers are myth and nightmare -- inspirations, pleasures, and punishments manifested beneath the blanketing mist of sleep. Surrender to him now. A stunning collection of visions, wonders, horrors, hallucinations, and revelations from Clive Barker, Barbara Hambly, Tad Williams, Gene Wolfe, Nancy A. Collins, and sixteen other incomparable dreamers -- inspired by the groundbreaking, bestselling graphic novel phenomenon by Neil Gaiman.

30 review for The Sandman: Book of Dreams

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Wallace

    I recently grabbed this book off my shelf, intending to just reread my favorite story "An Extra Smidge of Eternity" by Robert Rodi. And somehow ending up rereading the whole thing. I'm AMAZED at how much I'd forgotten from the last time I read it, because they're certainly not forgettable. I think I had as much fun reading this as I did the very first time I read it. "Splatter" by Will Shetterly is pretty disturbing, but it's wonderful for all of us who wanted to hear just a teeny bit more about I recently grabbed this book off my shelf, intending to just reread my favorite story "An Extra Smidge of Eternity" by Robert Rodi. And somehow ending up rereading the whole thing. I'm AMAZED at how much I'd forgotten from the last time I read it, because they're certainly not forgettable. I think I had as much fun reading this as I did the very first time I read it. "Splatter" by Will Shetterly is pretty disturbing, but it's wonderful for all of us who wanted to hear just a teeny bit more about the "Cereal Convention" from "A Doll's House." (The answer to the question "Do cereal collectors eat their collection?" has got to be my favorite line in the whole story.) "Masquerade and High Water" is wonderfully sweet, "Each Damp Thing" is great for getting your heart racing, "The Mender of Broken Dreams" gives you a great look at how the Dreaming works (love the little details about fixing the dream of a tapestry) and Stopp't Clock Yard is just amazing in its style and quirky humor. Every single author in this book did an AMAZING job, and how many anthologies have you read where you can say that?

  2. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    For eight years, Gaiman mined this rich vein, only to stop at the height of the series' popularity, at a point in time when he felt the story he had in mind from the beginning had reached its natural conclusion. Gaiman's creations live on however, in DC's new series "The Dreaming", and in this anthology, written by several mainstream (i.e., non-comic book) writers. Of Morpheus, from the Preface by Frank McConnell: "He is not a god; he is older than all the gods, and is their cause. He is the hum For eight years, Gaiman mined this rich vein, only to stop at the height of the series' popularity, at a point in time when he felt the story he had in mind from the beginning had reached its natural conclusion. Gaiman's creations live on however, in DC's new series "The Dreaming", and in this anthology, written by several mainstream (i.e., non-comic book) writers. Of Morpheus, from the Preface by Frank McConnell: "He is not a god; he is older than all the gods, and is their cause. He is the human capacity to imagine meaning, to tell stories: an anthropomorphic projection of our thirst for mythology. And as such, he is both greater and less than the humans whose dreams he shapes, but whose thirst, after all, shapes him. As Titania would say, he does not exist; and thus he is all that matters." Masquerade and High Water - Colin Greenland >> Provide insights into the backstage workings of The Endless, specifically that of the Pavilion of Recurrence. Chain Home, Low - John M. Ford >> What happened to those affected by Morpheus' disappearance during the time he was held captive in Burgess' basement? I almost skipped this story since it seemed to take forever to read. Stronger than Desire - Lisa Goldstein >> What is stronger than desire--is it love? What follows is a story about Desire and his/her human lover in so long a time, and of a wager between them. Included is a possible explanation of the origin of courtly love. Each Damp Thing - Barbara Hambly >> A scary piece featuring Cain and Abel. Cain unearths a mirror that Morpheus had hidden away for a pretty good reason. The Birth Day - B. W. Clough >> Wherein Morpheus visits a storyteller (the New Meeter of the band) who may just be too clever for her own good. Splatter - Will Shetterly >> A horror writer probably would have preferred to be guest of honor somewhere other than the Cereal Convention. Set at the infamous Serial Killers Convention as seen in "The Doll's House". "The world always made promises. Maybe he should see what the world delivered.". Seven Nights in Slumberland - George Alec Effinger >> A delightful tribute to both The Sandman and Little Nemo . Escape Artist - Caitlín R. Kiernan >> A take on the childhood days of Wanda, nee Alvin, Mann, whose first appearance was in the story arc "A Game of You". Having parents who exemplifies religious guilt is one of the worst ways to find out about who you truly are. An Extra Smidgen of Eternity - Robert Rodi >> "Stories are important. They're all we've got, really. Stories are hope. They take you out of yourself for a bit, and when you get dropped back in, you're different--you're stronger, you've seen more, you've felt more. Stories are like spiritual currency." Endless Sestina - Lawrence Schimel >> For the sheer accomplishment of it. (Note: A sestina is a classical verse form, six verses of six lines each, in which the final words recombine according to an obvious formula from stanza to stanza.) The Writer's Child - Tad Williams >> Is a finely crafted story about loyalty and the value of innocence set against the backdrop of Dream or the Player King recognizing it. It reminds me of Lyta Hall--of the dreamstuff invading the waking world. The Gate of Gold - Mark Kreighbaum >> "Even the Endless must dream." A story of a doll's courage to save his charge from the nightmares that plagues her every night, as a manifestation of her ugly family life. A Bone Dry Place - Karen Haber >> An appearance of Despair, "She is one of the Endless, sworn to duty here until the universe ends or her elder sister takes over." The Witch's Heart - Delia Sherman >> Featuring a she-wolf with a human shadow, a Eitch and a Lady (Desire playing yet again one of his/her games) for the quest to retrieve the witch's heart. The Mender of Broken Dreams - Nancy A. Collins >> One of the denizens of The Dreaming is The Mender, one repairs and restores dreams so they can be re-used from one dreamer to the next. Morpheus speaks of The Dreaming as such:"Every human born has the keys to my kingdom within them. For many the Dreaming is simply a place to escap[e the pressures of being mortal. For a handful of poets and madmen it is the land of portents, signs, and inspiration. But for others, it is the one place where true happiness can be found; where beggars ride as kings, the spurned find love, the hungry feast." Ain't You 'Most Done? - Gene Wolfe >> What if you were born but you simply have never dreamed? How would it be like for a person to never experience the wonders and horrors of dreaming and nightmares? Valóság and Élet - Steven Brust >> This one reads very much a leaf from "Brothers Grimm Fairytales" but is no less wonderful. How do you trap the powers of Death & Dream? Stopp't-Clock Yard - Susanna Clarke >> A tale that could easily have been part of the "World's End" story arc from the original series. (Gaiman himself comments "I wish I had written this story.") Clarke tells the amusing tale of magician Isaac Trismegistus and rogue John Paramore, a pair who invade Morpheus' realm to bring the deceased back to their loved ones. Morpheus is rendered perfectly, a distracted deity, swift to anger, but patient in the extreme. Dream waits out his tormentors, only to have his revenge stolen away by one of his siblings. Afterword: Death - Tori Amos >> A lyrical meditation on Death by songwriter Tori Amos close the anthology on a strong note (incidentally, this is also the introduction she wrote for "Death: The High Cost of Living"). On describing Death:"She keeps reminding me there is change in the 'what is' but change cannot be made till you accept the 'what is'." Although the stories are uniformly well crafted, they fail to break any new ground or provide novel insights into the rich cast of familiar characters. Most of the writers here seem content pursuing themes Gaiman has already visited rather than developing their own. Book Details: Title The Sandman: Book of Dreams (Signed) Author Edited by Neil Gaiman & Ed Kramer Reviewed By Purplycookie

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    A mixed bag, to be honest. There were some real winners, like Robert Rodi's "An Extra Smidgen of Eternity" and Delia Sherman's "The Witch's Heart". It was nice to see Susannah Clarke's story as well; I started reading her work because Neil Gaiman had said in an interview that she was an author he enjoyed. I didn't care for Lawrence Schimel's "Endless Sestina", but I don't, as a rule, like a lot of poetry. According to wikipedia, several other authors (including Harlan Ellison, Jane Yolen, Charle A mixed bag, to be honest. There were some real winners, like Robert Rodi's "An Extra Smidgen of Eternity" and Delia Sherman's "The Witch's Heart". It was nice to see Susannah Clarke's story as well; I started reading her work because Neil Gaiman had said in an interview that she was an author he enjoyed. I didn't care for Lawrence Schimel's "Endless Sestina", but I don't, as a rule, like a lot of poetry. According to wikipedia, several other authors (including Harlan Ellison, Jane Yolen, Charles de Lint, Martha Soukup, Karawynn Long, and Michael Berry) had originally signed up to contribute to the anthology, but dropped out due to some confusion between the contracts DC Vertigo was giving people, and what the anthology's editors had originally promised them. Pity, I would have loved to have seen what Yolen and de Lint would have done with Morpheus. (This also explains Gaiman's dedication page in the edition I read, apologizing to the above writers.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Philip Shade

    Since finishing the original run of The Sandman there have been countless Sandman stories written by almost as many authors. But before the The Dreaming or Sandman Universe spun tales inspired by Neil Gaiman's Jungian archetype there was The Sandman: Book of Dreams. It is the first collection of Sandman stories authored by anyone but Gaiman and set the tone for what would be the post-Gaiman Sandman universe that is still expanding 25 years later. Like any anthology different Book of Dreams autho Since finishing the original run of The Sandman there have been countless Sandman stories written by almost as many authors. But before the The Dreaming or Sandman Universe spun tales inspired by Neil Gaiman's Jungian archetype there was The Sandman: Book of Dreams. It is the first collection of Sandman stories authored by anyone but Gaiman and set the tone for what would be the post-Gaiman Sandman universe that is still expanding 25 years later. Like any anthology different Book of Dreams authors will appeal to different readers. Some of them are explicitly spinoff from, or fill in parts, of the original series. Other stories are dreams unto themselves; with only foundational reference to Gaiman's tales. I don't think any reader will give every story 5-stars, but I think that every fan will find a 5-star story, or three, between these covers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Kirk

    Like most anthologies, this is a mixed bag, i.e. some stories are better than others. However, even the best don't measure up to the standards of the Sandman comics, so I don't recommend it; at the very least, it's a book to borrow rather than buy. My favourite story is "Splatter" (by Will Shetterly), set during The Sandman, Vol. 4: Season of Mists. It works well on its own merits, but it doesn't quite fit with the source material. (view spoiler)[In the original story, Nimrod tells all the others Like most anthologies, this is a mixed bag, i.e. some stories are better than others. However, even the best don't measure up to the standards of the Sandman comics, so I don't recommend it; at the very least, it's a book to borrow rather than buy. My favourite story is "Splatter" (by Will Shetterly), set during The Sandman, Vol. 4: Season of Mists. It works well on its own merits, but it doesn't quite fit with the source material. (view spoiler)[In the original story, Nimrod tells all the others that they shouldn't "collect" (i.e. kill anyone) within 100 miles of the convention: "We don't shit where we eat." If we ignore morality, and just look at it pragmatically, that's a prudent decision. Similarly, he changed his mind when they discovered an undercover journalist: I can understand his motivation for doing that, and they drove away from the hotel first. However, in this story they deliberately intended to kill at least two people on stage, i.e. inside the hotel. That weakens the original story, since he's saying "Don't kill anyone. Well, except for him. And those two. And maybe that other guy too. But nobody else!" (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This is a collection of 18 stories by various authors (not Gaiman himself) who have written their pieces based on Gaiman's great concept of the Endless and of Morpheus, the Sandman, the King of Dreams. I only found two of them to be compelling--hence the three stars. But the two stories themselves are 5 stars for each. These two were the only ones to really bring the Dreaming World into the tale. Barbara Hambly uses Gaiman's Cain and Abel to compose a chilling story called "Each Damp Thing", whe This is a collection of 18 stories by various authors (not Gaiman himself) who have written their pieces based on Gaiman's great concept of the Endless and of Morpheus, the Sandman, the King of Dreams. I only found two of them to be compelling--hence the three stars. But the two stories themselves are 5 stars for each. These two were the only ones to really bring the Dreaming World into the tale. Barbara Hambly uses Gaiman's Cain and Abel to compose a chilling story called "Each Damp Thing", where Morpheus must use all his powers to confront the evil Cain has unleased. He is so angry with Cain that he is poised to obliterate him--but Abel pleads for his brother's life, even though he knows they are doomed to repeat their own story forever. The best one for me is "The Mender of Broken Dreams" by Nancy A. Collins. When the Mender learns who he really is, that moment is the best in the book imho. I can't imagine anyone "getting" this book unless they are truly fans of the Sandman graphic novels, which have enchanted and haunted me for years. I suppose one could do the inevitable "googling" and get the background of the Endless--but the story is so much more intricate that that. Thank you to Hambly and Collins for enriching the Dream King and his castle for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    María Ciancio

    Excellent. I just took a long time to read because each story was bewitching in it's own way, it just didn't feel right to read one immediately after another. There's some dark entrancing magic to every tale. Really a great selection. Excellent. I just took a long time to read because each story was bewitching in it's own way, it just didn't feel right to read one immediately after another. There's some dark entrancing magic to every tale. Really a great selection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Airiz

    I’ll be blunt—this is perhaps not the best anthology of short stories about Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman graphic novels. They are not on par with the quality of the original series, although that’s not saying this collection is totally unreadable. It's just...dominated with duds. There are some shorts that are so engrossing like “Each Damp Thing,” “Splatter,” (my favorite!) and “Stoppt Clock Yard.” I also liked Tori Amos’ epilogue about Death, although technically it’s more like a personal reflecti I’ll be blunt—this is perhaps not the best anthology of short stories about Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman graphic novels. They are not on par with the quality of the original series, although that’s not saying this collection is totally unreadable. It's just...dominated with duds. There are some shorts that are so engrossing like “Each Damp Thing,” “Splatter,” (my favorite!) and “Stoppt Clock Yard.” I also liked Tori Amos’ epilogue about Death, although technically it’s more like a personal reflection where she “encounters” the quirky Endless. The others just elicited long yawns from me, or just made me feel like getting through them is a chore. I guess they just don’t have the “popcorn for the hungry mind” feel the epic ten-volume series gives the readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christian McKay

    You already know in your heart whether you want to read this collection or not. But if you're in a rush, and you aren't sure if other authors are capable of capturing that Gaiman magic, try these: Each Damp Thing by Barbara Hambly The Witch's Heart by Delia Sherman and Stopp't-Clock Yard by Susanna Clarke (which is arguably one of the greatest Sandman stories ever written) You already know in your heart whether you want to read this collection or not. But if you're in a rush, and you aren't sure if other authors are capable of capturing that Gaiman magic, try these: Each Damp Thing by Barbara Hambly The Witch's Heart by Delia Sherman and Stopp't-Clock Yard by Susanna Clarke (which is arguably one of the greatest Sandman stories ever written)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The best thing I can say about this collection of stories is that it makes the source material that much better in comparison.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarede Switzer

    I'm not usually into fan fiction but seeing as these stories were endorsed and I think hand selected by Neil Gaiman I figured I'd give it a try. Enjoyed some of the stories more than others. My favorites were "Stronger Than Desire", "Splatter" (this was my fave), "Escape Artist" "An Extra Smidgen of Eternity", "The Writer's Child" (actually maybe this was my fave. Suuuuuper creepy.), "The Witches Heart", I'm not usually into fan fiction but seeing as these stories were endorsed and I think hand selected by Neil Gaiman I figured I'd give it a try. Enjoyed some of the stories more than others. My favorites were "Stronger Than Desire", "Splatter" (this was my fave), "Escape Artist" "An Extra Smidgen of Eternity", "The Writer's Child" (actually maybe this was my fave. Suuuuuper creepy.), "The Witches Heart",

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I really couldn't get into this book. I realize all the characters were symbolic of different things in life and I realize each story had a theme. Most of the stories, I would get half way through and just give up. I couldn't develop a connection with any of the stories which is a shame because by reading the description of the book, this should be right up my alley. I really couldn't get into this book. I realize all the characters were symbolic of different things in life and I realize each story had a theme. Most of the stories, I would get half way through and just give up. I couldn't develop a connection with any of the stories which is a shame because by reading the description of the book, this should be right up my alley.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    I shelved this as fandom because it's basically high-end Sandman fanfic. Fortunately, most of it is very very good. A few are wrenching; only one was too dull to finish. I enjoyed recognizing names that would become more well known later - Susanna Clarke, for example, makes an excellent contribution. Overall an excellent re-visit to the world of Gaiman's Sandman. I shelved this as fandom because it's basically high-end Sandman fanfic. Fortunately, most of it is very very good. A few are wrenching; only one was too dull to finish. I enjoyed recognizing names that would become more well known later - Susanna Clarke, for example, makes an excellent contribution. Overall an excellent re-visit to the world of Gaiman's Sandman.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Boethia

    As with (almost) every anthology, this collection is somehow unbalanced. I basically didn't care for any of the stories from the first half of the book and I've enjoyed a fair bit of the second half - so I guess there's a balance in a sense, although this is entirely subjective. The stories are of course connected by theme (sometimes very loosely, but the majority of them feature Morpheus or his siblings) and they're all within the same genre, which was to be expected, but to be honest, I'd welco As with (almost) every anthology, this collection is somehow unbalanced. I basically didn't care for any of the stories from the first half of the book and I've enjoyed a fair bit of the second half - so I guess there's a balance in a sense, although this is entirely subjective. The stories are of course connected by theme (sometimes very loosely, but the majority of them feature Morpheus or his siblings) and they're all within the same genre, which was to be expected, but to be honest, I'd welcome more diversity/experimentation. Not saying every short story was the same, but they weren't that different either; although each author had their own specific style and take on the dream realm, there wasn't anything that would hugely stand out, which ultimately leads to the unavoidable - juxtaposing the stories with Gaiman's own writing, which of course makes them a bit pale in comparison. It's almost as if the authors were too afraid to diverge from the lore, which is another reason why it's such a shame Harlan Ellison didn't contribute in the end, as he surely wouldn't treat Sandman as untouchable, and would write something jaw-dropping (for better or worse). Finally, my favourites: Splatter (serial killer convention from the Doll House p. II), Escape Artist (Alvin's/Wanda's backstory which I can pretty well imagine as being canon), The Witch's Heart (dark and heartbreaking Brothers Grimm type of fairy-tale).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Miles Ford

    The Sandman: Book of Dreams Neil Gaiman The Sandman: Book of Dreams is a collection of the graphic novels by the name The Sandman. They are about a being named Dream. He is the master of dreams and can change anyone’s dream as he sees fit. He faces struggle when he is drawn from his kingdom and help captive for one hundred years by an organization wanting power. A side effect to Dream being held captive is that some people never wake up from their dreams. I enjoyed the character Dream, or Morpheus, The Sandman: Book of Dreams Neil Gaiman The Sandman: Book of Dreams is a collection of the graphic novels by the name The Sandman. They are about a being named Dream. He is the master of dreams and can change anyone’s dream as he sees fit. He faces struggle when he is drawn from his kingdom and help captive for one hundred years by an organization wanting power. A side effect to Dream being held captive is that some people never wake up from their dreams. I enjoyed the character Dream, or Morpheus, because of the way he manages to achieve any goal without even lifting a finger. He has an air of power around him. He is interesting with the way he goes to achieve his goals, he usually threatens but never has to go through with the threats. A relationship I felt was important was the relationship between Dream and Death. When Dream has given up hope on finding one of his items of power Death convinces him that he should keep searching. When he is trapped in a prison in hell he calls on Death for help and she manages to free him. Without Death, Dream would've been stuck in hell or given up hope. One thing the book made me think about was the way a place in Dream’s kingdom becomes a real person and how he had to give up life to help restore balance and help the "mortals" live their lives. The thing I liked about this part was the way that he sacrificed himself to let others live. He did it without arguing and with no fuss. I thought it was a great show of selflessness. I really enjoyed the way this book was filled with many different stories but they all had an underlying story running throughout them. It all felt connected but not too focused on the one thing at all times. I also enjoyed the way parts of the stories were humorous and others were quite serious, with serious themes. I felt it made the book more enjoyable to read as after a very serious story it would most likely roll into quite a relaxed one with a laid back vibe to it. I would recommend this to anyone that enjoys Neil Gaiman's work or fans of more serious graphic novels.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tara Hall

    I have been a fan of Neil Gaiman since the 90s, and so when I saw this anthology of short stories based on his characters, I picked it up used. It took me a long time to read, as most of the stories were not ones that kept me on the edge of my seat. It also had been some time since I had read Sandman, and though I once had been familiar with the seven siblings Dream, Death, Desire, Despair, Destruction, Delirium, and Destiny, remembering them took about half the book. Anthologies are hard to rate I have been a fan of Neil Gaiman since the 90s, and so when I saw this anthology of short stories based on his characters, I picked it up used. It took me a long time to read, as most of the stories were not ones that kept me on the edge of my seat. It also had been some time since I had read Sandman, and though I once had been familiar with the seven siblings Dream, Death, Desire, Despair, Destruction, Delirium, and Destiny, remembering them took about half the book. Anthologies are hard to rate. If I really like one story, I tend to let that overshadow the rest, and bump up the rating. However, the reverse is true for a bad story. This anthology had several of both kinds of stories, with a lot of stories that were decent, too. There were of course some really fantastic stories, such as Splatter by Will Shetterly, about an author who gets access to a serial killer convention, Each Damp Thing by Baraba Hambly, about Cain and Abel's discovery of a monstrous thing that threatens to destroy The Dreaming, and The Gate of Cold, by Mark Kreighbaum, about a doll who goes in search of the Dream King to end his beloved human child's nightmares. These stories are worth buying the anthology to read and should not be missed. there were several other stories that were average and decent, too. However, there were twice as many stories that were not so good. They felt to me like dreams, with a lot of disconnects and things that didn't make that much sense. I also must give credit here to The Witch's Heart, which ranks as the single most terrible short story I have ever read in my life. This was not because this story was not well written, because is was well written. But it was the most depressing thing I have ever read, ever.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jsrott

    Excellent selection of stories that continue the epic world of Gaiman's Sandman. It shows just how well executed the cycle is by how easy it is to envision these tales, even without the aid of graphics. Very satisfying, but makes me want to go back and read the originals all over again. Excellent selection of stories that continue the epic world of Gaiman's Sandman. It shows just how well executed the cycle is by how easy it is to envision these tales, even without the aid of graphics. Very satisfying, but makes me want to go back and read the originals all over again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Izlinda

    I don't know if the newer printed edition of this (paperback, and with a different cover) is in any way different from this edition (hardcover with a yellow and blue cover with a raven). But I don't think they are, and this was the only the library had available. It is strange to read stories in prose based in this universe made by Neil Gaiman. I've read the Dreaming and Destiny graphic novels after finishing the series (and the two Death graphic novels and the one drawn by Yoshitaka Amano) so sw I don't know if the newer printed edition of this (paperback, and with a different cover) is in any way different from this edition (hardcover with a yellow and blue cover with a raven). But I don't think they are, and this was the only the library had available. It is strange to read stories in prose based in this universe made by Neil Gaiman. I've read the Dreaming and Destiny graphic novels after finishing the series (and the two Death graphic novels and the one drawn by Yoshitaka Amano) so switching to prose without images was a little jarring. There several jems in here, and there were some stories that made me go "okay, next on." There were any stories I hated but just those I liked least. The ones I really liked were "Stronger Than Desire" by Lisa Goldstein, "Splatter" by Will Shetterly (the cereal convention was a wonderful story arc in the Sandman series themselves), "Seven Nights in Slumberland" by George Alec Effinger (I was first introduced to "Little Nemo" by a college class last year), "The Writer's Child" by Tad Williams (while a little disturbing, it was wonderfully written), "The Witch's Heart" by Delia Sherman and "The Mender of Broken Dreams" by Nancy A. Collins.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kitty

    Ho hum, ho hum, after the absolute power house that was The Sandman I find myself assured in my beliefs that no one but Neil himself should ever write for the series. Over all this was a very bland collection of stories hat at times had very little to do with any of The Endless that ranged from mediocre to down right painful for the most of the book. However there were a few good pieces in here that definitely made it worth while to drudge through the lesser parts. Masquerade & High Water, Ain’t Ho hum, ho hum, after the absolute power house that was The Sandman I find myself assured in my beliefs that no one but Neil himself should ever write for the series. Over all this was a very bland collection of stories hat at times had very little to do with any of The Endless that ranged from mediocre to down right painful for the most of the book. However there were a few good pieces in here that definitely made it worth while to drudge through the lesser parts. Masquerade & High Water, Ain’t You Most Done Yet and the Witch’s Heart were all middle ground for me, being entertaining but not particularly outstanding. The true stars for this collection for me were Each Damp Thing, Splatter, Valosay and Elet and Stopp’t Clock Yard. The only story I found absolutely 100% appalling beyond belief in it’s insipid story telling was The Birth Day which was so bad that I almost put down the book and decided to stop reading if it hadn’t been for the fact that blissfully I decided to read one more story and came across Will Shetterly’s absolutely brutal, if at times a bit obvious, Splatter. Over all this isn’t the worst way to spend an evening, but it’s by no mean’s Gaiman’s Sandman and anyone looking for the brilliant story telling we got in canon will be advised to look elsewhere.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    this collection of short stories based about and around neil gaiman's characters from his 'sandman' graphic novel series is actually pretty good. some better than other but after coming kind of late into the game with the sandman stuff i devoured everything that had anything to do with the series. i couldn't let it go yet. i was please and slightly relieved that i wasn't the only one. these stories only gave proff to how inspiring sandman was. everyone wanted a crack at gaiman's storytelling mag this collection of short stories based about and around neil gaiman's characters from his 'sandman' graphic novel series is actually pretty good. some better than other but after coming kind of late into the game with the sandman stuff i devoured everything that had anything to do with the series. i couldn't let it go yet. i was please and slightly relieved that i wasn't the only one. these stories only gave proff to how inspiring sandman was. everyone wanted a crack at gaiman's storytelling magic. it's worth reading.

  21. 5 out of 5

    George

    Enjoyable, but not as good as the actual Sandman stories. A few of the stories here were great, but most felt to me like someone going out of their way to write a story about the Endless. Like the authors thought it would be cool and fun, but since they weren't their characters it was like wearing a pair of shoes that don't quite fit. Recommended for anyone that loved The Sandman, but if you haven't read those, this isn't a must-read (although you may actually like it better without knowing Gaim Enjoyable, but not as good as the actual Sandman stories. A few of the stories here were great, but most felt to me like someone going out of their way to write a story about the Endless. Like the authors thought it would be cool and fun, but since they weren't their characters it was like wearing a pair of shoes that don't quite fit. Recommended for anyone that loved The Sandman, but if you haven't read those, this isn't a must-read (although you may actually like it better without knowing Gaiman's stories). 3.5 stars on this for me...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I found this book to be really interesting and very diverse. Which I think lended its self to making it a good read. The variances of stories and how the authors presented them was different idea and understanding. Going to the table of contents I saw one story that I thought I was going to really like it turned out I actually hated it and not because of the writer or the style but more of the content. So I like that it kept me on the edge of my seat. I was understanding of different tales and d I found this book to be really interesting and very diverse. Which I think lended its self to making it a good read. The variances of stories and how the authors presented them was different idea and understanding. Going to the table of contents I saw one story that I thought I was going to really like it turned out I actually hated it and not because of the writer or the style but more of the content. So I like that it kept me on the edge of my seat. I was understanding of different tales and different methods of telling us tales.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    Didn't finish this one; am not counting this as being read this year for that reason. I like the Sandman universe very well, I just wasn't feeling it too powerfully under other people's direction. Might be my problem, rather than a problem with the stories directly as I didn't read them all. Oh well, at least there are some graphic novels I haven't read in the series. Didn't finish this one; am not counting this as being read this year for that reason. I like the Sandman universe very well, I just wasn't feeling it too powerfully under other people's direction. Might be my problem, rather than a problem with the stories directly as I didn't read them all. Oh well, at least there are some graphic novels I haven't read in the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is basically fan fiction. I stopped reading as soon as I had another book in my hand. I love the Endless, but stories about the Endless are best in graphic novel form, and written by Neil Gaiman.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Hmmm, I realize Gaiman probably loved all of these stories, but I only like about half of them. The other ones made it hard to finish the book, even if they were short stories. But that's what happens when you have different authors in one book, very rare that you will like all of it. Hmmm, I realize Gaiman probably loved all of these stories, but I only like about half of them. The other ones made it hard to finish the book, even if they were short stories. But that's what happens when you have different authors in one book, very rare that you will like all of it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Velvetink

    Just found this on my shelves again. Must read it again. I had not heard of the Sandman before this. Once tasted fully addicted.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Carpenter

    I was expecting so much more! Some of the stories were neat and wished they were longer, others couldn't end quick enough. Overall it was good, but did not meet my high expectations! I was expecting so much more! Some of the stories were neat and wished they were longer, others couldn't end quick enough. Overall it was good, but did not meet my high expectations!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    i like so much the story of Lisa Goldstein "STRONGER THAN DESIRE"..... i like so much the story of Lisa Goldstein "STRONGER THAN DESIRE".....

  29. 5 out of 5

    Springtxman

    Book of short stories, probably better as graphic novel than short story

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vasil Kolev

    I've been reading this for a while, some of the stories in it are good, but a lot are just tangled and unreadable. I've been reading this for a while, some of the stories in it are good, but a lot are just tangled and unreadable.

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