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The Queen of France

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Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father. When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Roya Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father. When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Royal Physician may be found. The odd thing is, when Rose returns to look for the Queen of France, she’s nowhere to be seen. And when the imperious queen comes back, she’s curious to know what Rose’s parents would think if she traded places with their little girl? With charming illustrations by Kady MacDonald Denton and a humorous tale by Tim Wadham, here is a sweet homage to the easy affection between parents and an imaginative child.


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Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father. When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Roya Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father. When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Royal Physician may be found. The odd thing is, when Rose returns to look for the Queen of France, she’s nowhere to be seen. And when the imperious queen comes back, she’s curious to know what Rose’s parents would think if she traded places with their little girl? With charming illustrations by Kady MacDonald Denton and a humorous tale by Tim Wadham, here is a sweet homage to the easy affection between parents and an imaginative child.

30 review for The Queen of France

  1. 5 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    I love this kid. I love the way Rose talks, the language she uses. ("My finger requires medical attention." and "I am shocked to see that you do your own cooking.") I love her imagination and how she devotes herself completely to it. I love the way her parents play right along as she appears and reappears as the Queen of France. And I love the fact that she looks 75-years-old because that's how Kady MacDonald Denton draws people no matter the age and I love Kady MacDonald Denton from Bonny Becke I love this kid. I love the way Rose talks, the language she uses. ("My finger requires medical attention." and "I am shocked to see that you do your own cooking.") I love her imagination and how she devotes herself completely to it. I love the way her parents play right along as she appears and reappears as the Queen of France. And I love the fact that she looks 75-years-old because that's how Kady MacDonald Denton draws people no matter the age and I love Kady MacDonald Denton from Bonny Becker's Bear and Mouse books (A Visitor for Bear being the first), so I love her Rose. I believe little girls who love to play dress-up will love Rose as much as I do.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Madam read this to me before bedtime the other night; I love that we can still do that together. (I will pick out picture books, and we will cuddle in bed together and read and do voices. I dread the day when she says that she is "too big" or "too old" or some other nonsense to read with me anymore like that. It will absolutely break part of my heart, however, I am sure it will come sometime. Children must be allowed to grow and develop and discover their authentic selves....) Sorry, anyway, *bri Madam read this to me before bedtime the other night; I love that we can still do that together. (I will pick out picture books, and we will cuddle in bed together and read and do voices. I dread the day when she says that she is "too big" or "too old" or some other nonsense to read with me anymore like that. It will absolutely break part of my heart, however, I am sure it will come sometime. Children must be allowed to grow and develop and discover their authentic selves....) Sorry, anyway, *brisk head shake here* Madam and I very much enjoyed Rose and also the Queen of France. Madam loved the fact that Rose woke up feeling Royal, and I loved how Rose's parents were so present throughout the whole story. Madam got hung up on some of the transitioning ("when did she put on the skirt? It doesn't say, and it doesn't show!") And we both very much enjoyed the thought of Rose feeling "scary."

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

    I like that she found the Queen of France.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    When Rose woke up in the morning, she was feeling royal. So on went the crown, jewelry and skirt that turned her the Queen of France. The Queen of France walked up to Rose’s mother in the garden and asked if she had seen Rose. Rose’s mother explained that she hadn’t but that she hoped that Rose would remember to clean up her room. The Queen of France was also interested in the ugly rose bushes that Rose’s mother was planting, but the queen’s finger was pricked by a thorn, so she had to find the When Rose woke up in the morning, she was feeling royal. So on went the crown, jewelry and skirt that turned her the Queen of France. The Queen of France walked up to Rose’s mother in the garden and asked if she had seen Rose. Rose’s mother explained that she hadn’t but that she hoped that Rose would remember to clean up her room. The Queen of France was also interested in the ugly rose bushes that Rose’s mother was planting, but the queen’s finger was pricked by a thorn, so she had to find the Royal Physician. The queen found Rose’s father, but not the Royal Physician. The queen then took off her crown, and became Rose again. She bandaged her finger and cleaned her room. She then dressed as the queen again and headed to Rose’s mother. The queen asked if Rose’s mother would be fine with the queen switching places with Rose. Rose’s mother considered the idea, but explained that she would miss Rose very much if she left. The queen left and Rose returned to herself for dinner. Until that evening, when Rose felt scary… Debut author, Wadham has created a picture book that celebrates imaginative play in a very charming way. Rose is supported by her parents in her play, both of them happily participating as Rose changes characters. The parents remain supportive and kind throughout, never questioning that Rose is playing rather than cleaning her room, just giving broad hints that it should be done. The illustrations add to the charm of the book, with their soft palette of pinks and blues and a lovely mix of modern and old fashioned feel. Yes, this is a pink book with glitter on the cover, but it is a book that both boys and girls will enjoy thanks to its quality. Rose’s body language changes as she becomes the queen, her nose high in the air and her feet prancing high. I particularly enjoy the small clutter in the rooms: toys on the ground, bowls on the counter. Highly recommended, let’s hope Tim Wadham continues to create books like this with their deep understanding of childhood. Appropriate for ages 4-7.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    The more I read this, the more I like it. I don't think it's a storytime book (if you try it and it works great, let me know!) but it's a super story for sharing. It models wonderfully how to play out the what-then and what-next of imaginative play: what happens AFTER you put on the dress up clothes? The pleasure Rose feels in asking her parents questions that she knows they know she knows the answers to is palpable. Great parents. Great self-sufficient little kid. Wonderful illustrations--catch The more I read this, the more I like it. I don't think it's a storytime book (if you try it and it works great, let me know!) but it's a super story for sharing. It models wonderfully how to play out the what-then and what-next of imaginative play: what happens AFTER you put on the dress up clothes? The pleasure Rose feels in asking her parents questions that she knows they know she knows the answers to is palpable. Great parents. Great self-sufficient little kid. Wonderful illustrations--catching the way kids squat on the ground, how Kate walks differently as the Queen of France, the toys all over the kitchen floor, the loving and amused looks on the parents' faces.

  6. 4 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    Fancy Nancy, go away--Rose is my kind of girl! Sweet, charming, utterly believable and with a small echo of the Hobans' immortal Frances in the parent/child relationship.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate Conley

    Anyone with a little person who has an affinity for costume will enjoy this book. The parents are fun, playing along and fostering the young girl's imagination along the way.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Miri

    Fun, and I hope there's a sequel about the suit she puts on at the end.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    **I am currently taking a class from the author (two more weeks to go, raise the praise hands), but my views and opinions are always my own and honest. I like my soul too much to trade it for a grade. And he has too much integrity to even consider such a thing.** My 12-year-old was reading this when she saw it on our kitchen counter and refused to stop until she finished. Then I read it. Then we both told the 9-year-old to read it. Then I read it again. It’s a darling story with a smart, imaginat **I am currently taking a class from the author (two more weeks to go, raise the praise hands), but my views and opinions are always my own and honest. I like my soul too much to trade it for a grade. And he has too much integrity to even consider such a thing.** My 12-year-old was reading this when she saw it on our kitchen counter and refused to stop until she finished. Then I read it. Then we both told the 9-year-old to read it. Then I read it again. It’s a darling story with a smart, imaginative little girl and parents who genuinely encourage her imagination. The language is both simple enough that I can read this to my younger nieces and nephews (who will get a kick out of Rose’s creativity and her awesome make believe basket), and refined enough to not bore an older child—or their parent. The illustrations complement the words beautifully with additional ideas of make believe to accompany Rose’s —excuse me, the Queen of France’s, day. The ending was a great turn. I agree with another reviewer that I’d love to read a sequel about her further adventures.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rommel Sison

    5-year-old daughter: 👸🏼 7-year-old daughter: 👸👸👸👸

  11. 4 out of 5

    Set

    It's a tad bit boring, nes pas? This is a story of a little girl playing with her parents because she doesn't have siblings or friends around the house, sweet but a little sad.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    What little girl wouldn’t love a book about playing dress up?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    10 April 2011 THE QUEEN OF FRANCE by Tim Wadham and Kady MacDonald Denton, ill., Candlewick, March 2011, 32p., ISBN: 978-0-7636-4102-3 "The Queen of France went to Rose's room. "She took off the necklaces. "She took off the bracelets. "She put them in the jewelry box. "She took off the crown."She put it in the make-believe basket. "She went to the hall closet. "She found a bandage and put it on her finger. "Then she put on a second one, just in case. "Then Rose went to find her mother." I never ever tho 10 April 2011 THE QUEEN OF FRANCE by Tim Wadham and Kady MacDonald Denton, ill., Candlewick, March 2011, 32p., ISBN: 978-0-7636-4102-3 "The Queen of France went to Rose's room. "She took off the necklaces. "She took off the bracelets. "She put them in the jewelry box. "She took off the crown."She put it in the make-believe basket. "She went to the hall closet. "She found a bandage and put it on her finger. "Then she put on a second one, just in case. "Then Rose went to find her mother." I never ever thought that I would gush about a picturebook with sparkles on the cover. But Kady MacDonald Denton's name and cover illustration are also on the cover of THE QUEEN OF FRANCE, and I am very fond of her work. THE QUEEN OF FRANCE is a most wonderful story about a child engaged in pretend play. This is a picturebook that will make kids smile and will truly excite any number of on-the-ball parents who seek out captivating reads-alouds, and on-the-ball early childhood educators who search for circletime winners, understand the great benefits of pretend play, and who put great effort into providing young students with dress up clothing, costumes, jewelry, hats, and pretend play props. THE QUEEN OF FRANCE follows Rose's day of pretending after she wakes up in the morning feeling royal. Changing in and out of her costume de jour, she interacts with her parents both as herself, Rose, and as the Queen of France. "'Hello, Rose's mother,' said the Queen of France. "'Hello again,' said Rose's mother. "'I am quite shocked to see that you do your own cooking,' said the queen. "'Well, here in the village. we have to cook for ourselves.' "The queen considered this, then said, 'I cannot find Rose. Would you ask her something for me?' "'I would be happy to,' said Rose's mother. "'I would like to trade places with Rose,' said the Queen of France. 'I am tired of being queen. I will be your daughter, and she can be queen.' "'Your Majesty,' said Rose's mother, 'I am sure Rose would love that.'" Throughout the story, the interaction of text and illustration is a joy to behold. They play off one another with an ebullience and perfection that reminds me of watching Michael and Scottie playing together twenty years ago. I also really love how, while the story of Rose is progressing, Rose's large stuffed animals - including a giraffe, a panda, a cockatoo, a monkey, a honey bear, and a bunny -- are taking turns either looking directly at the reader or are closely watching Rose aka The Queen of France. A royal treat. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.com [email protected] Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/middle_... Moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EcolIt/ http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/people/facult...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fats

    Tim Wadham’s picturebook tells the captivating story of a little girl whose “make-believe basket” tranforms her into royalty. Adorned with royal crown and jewelry, Rose becomes the Queen of France. The Queen of France goes around the house and talks to Rose’s parents. She asked them if they had seen Rose. Neither Rose's mother nor Rose's father has seen Rose. Unable to find the person she was looking for, the Queen of France decides to go to Rose’s room. She takes off her royal accessories, puts Tim Wadham’s picturebook tells the captivating story of a little girl whose “make-believe basket” tranforms her into royalty. Adorned with royal crown and jewelry, Rose becomes the Queen of France. The Queen of France goes around the house and talks to Rose’s parents. She asked them if they had seen Rose. Neither Rose's mother nor Rose's father has seen Rose. Unable to find the person she was looking for, the Queen of France decides to go to Rose’s room. She takes off her royal accessories, puts it back in the make-believe basket, and becomes Rose again. She then sets out to find her mother and ask her if she has seen the Queen of France. I’m sure you would have guessed by now what her mother tells her. This cycles throughout the book, with progress and variation in narrative details that I leave for you to find out. I enjoyed reading about Rose and her alter ego, the Queen of France. I like the dialogue exchanges between the latter and Rose’s parents. What I like most about Tim Wadham’s debut picturebook is how it showed parents’ involvement with Rose’s pretend play. Pretend plays are mostly child-centered. Parents’ active participation allows them to teach their child social values by incorporating these values into plays. Also, Kady Denton’s illustrations, done in ink, watercolor, and gouache add charm to this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A charming, everyday story of make-believe, The Queen of France gives us a glimpse into the rich interior life of little Rose. When Rose wakes up feeling royal, she decides to become the Queen of France and spends her day switching between being herself and being the Queen. As her day progresses, she discovers that while being Queen has some distinct advantages (everyone knows Queens never have to clean their own rooms), in the end she would much rather be just Rose, her parents' daughter. Kady M A charming, everyday story of make-believe, The Queen of France gives us a glimpse into the rich interior life of little Rose. When Rose wakes up feeling royal, she decides to become the Queen of France and spends her day switching between being herself and being the Queen. As her day progresses, she discovers that while being Queen has some distinct advantages (everyone knows Queens never have to clean their own rooms), in the end she would much rather be just Rose, her parents' daughter. Kady MacDonald Denton's illustrations, done in ink, watercolor and gouache, are full of pastel washes of color that perfectly fit Rose's flights of fancy. The compositions are well varied with spot art on some spreads, full bleed illustrations that take up the whole page at other times and even some pages with clever borders indicating whether the reader is in the presence of the Queen or Rose herself. I wouldn't use this for storytime, but it's a perfect lapsit story for PreK to first grade kids who have fertile imaginations or tend to be dreamers. Read this with a friend's four year old and I don't think she got it exactly - I think I would revise the age recommendation up to K-2nd grade. Everytime I read it I do like it more - this charmed me completely!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Powell

    A beautiful picture book about the power of imagination! Wonderful!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Atziri

    I loved this story, it just simply made me smile and remember all the characters I used to make-up myself when I was small. The funny thing is that the author captured an incident with his daughter and turned it into this story. The "Queen of France" tells the story of a little girl called Rose who wakes up one day feeling royal. She dresses up and becomes the "Queen of France" and encounters "Rose's mom". She asks about Rose and says she is looking for her. When she can't find Rose, she goes ba I loved this story, it just simply made me smile and remember all the characters I used to make-up myself when I was small. The funny thing is that the author captured an incident with his daughter and turned it into this story. The "Queen of France" tells the story of a little girl called Rose who wakes up one day feeling royal. She dresses up and becomes the "Queen of France" and encounters "Rose's mom". She asks about Rose and says she is looking for her. When she can't find Rose, she goes back and then actually turns back, changes clothes and turns back into Rose. Rose returns to look for the Queen of France. This happens a couple of times as the day goes by and every time Rose's mom is there to answer the Queen of France's question. Ultimately, the Queen of France wants to know if she would be OK with having Rose trade places with her. And thus this story celebrates the playful connection between two wise parents and their wonderful imaginative girl, and their love for her.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marika

    One day Rose wakes up feeling royal. She layers costume pieces and jewelry until, volia! The Queen of France is up and about. Throughout the day Rose changes between herself and the Queen of France, her delightful parents taking it all in stride. But when the Queen of France tells Rose’s mother that she would like to trade places with Rose, Rose’s mother tells her that she will miss Rose “Infinity times infinity.” The Queen of France is a simple story that probably occurs in many households every One day Rose wakes up feeling royal. She layers costume pieces and jewelry until, volia! The Queen of France is up and about. Throughout the day Rose changes between herself and the Queen of France, her delightful parents taking it all in stride. But when the Queen of France tells Rose’s mother that she would like to trade places with Rose, Rose’s mother tells her that she will miss Rose “Infinity times infinity.” The Queen of France is a simple story that probably occurs in many households everyday, yet it retains a feeling of magic. Denton’s ink and watercolor illustrations capture the expressiveness of an energetic child. The simplicity of a pointed toe or uplifted finger reveals Rose’s (or as the case may be, the Queen of France’s) every opinion. The best book with glitter on the cover.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Rose decides she is royal when she wakes up, so she becomes the Queen of France. She seeks out Rose’s mother, but no one knows where Rose is. She pricks her finger on a rose plant and goes back to her room to become Rose again. Now no one can locate the Queen of France, so Rose returns to her room. Again, she becomes Queen of France and asks Rose’s mother if it would be possible for her to change places with Rose as she is weary of being queen. “’Just how much will you miss her?’ the queen asked Rose decides she is royal when she wakes up, so she becomes the Queen of France. She seeks out Rose’s mother, but no one knows where Rose is. She pricks her finger on a rose plant and goes back to her room to become Rose again. Now no one can locate the Queen of France, so Rose returns to her room. Again, she becomes Queen of France and asks Rose’s mother if it would be possible for her to change places with Rose as she is weary of being queen. “’Just how much will you miss her?’ the queen asked. ‘I will miss her infinity times infinity,’ said Rose’s mother. ‘That is a very large amount,’ said the queen.” So the Queen of France decides that Rose is too precious to be replaced. Which, of course, she is. Absolutely delightful tale of how much parents and their children love each other.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bridget R. Wilson

    Rose likes to play dress up. Today, she's the Queen of France. When she's the Queen, she pretends not to know herself or her parents. When she's Rose, she doesn't know the queen. What I thought: A lovely book that showcases the wonder that is imaginative play. I like how Rose's parents don't discourage her (very similar to Roslyn Rutabaga & the Biggest Hole on Earth). The illustrations are beautiful--soft colored and very girly. My favorite illustrations are Rose as the Queen (prancing) and Rose Rose likes to play dress up. Today, she's the Queen of France. When she's the Queen, she pretends not to know herself or her parents. When she's Rose, she doesn't know the queen. What I thought: A lovely book that showcases the wonder that is imaginative play. I like how Rose's parents don't discourage her (very similar to Roslyn Rutabaga & the Biggest Hole on Earth). The illustrations are beautiful--soft colored and very girly. My favorite illustrations are Rose as the Queen (prancing) and Rose feeling scary. I wouldn't mind seeing more books about Rose and her dress up. Story Time Theme: Imagination

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Rose starts off each day by dressing to match her mood. She is obviously the daughter of very supportive parents since her room is filled with all sorts of clothing suitable for playing whatever roles suits her. What's more, when Rose ventures from her room in the guise of the Queen of France, both her mother and father treat her with respect, never talking down to her, yet never allowing her to lose sight of the advantages her loving family offers her. This wonderful picture book is filled with Rose starts off each day by dressing to match her mood. She is obviously the daughter of very supportive parents since her room is filled with all sorts of clothing suitable for playing whatever roles suits her. What's more, when Rose ventures from her room in the guise of the Queen of France, both her mother and father treat her with respect, never talking down to her, yet never allowing her to lose sight of the advantages her loving family offers her. This wonderful picture book is filled with illustrations that show Rose and her parents, warts and all, and that somehow make all three family members come to life. I can't wait to see who and what Rose grows up to become.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Rose wakes up feeling royal. The Queen emerges from Roses' room a few minutes later. She finds Rose's mother and asks after Rose. Mother hasn't seen her and The Queen accidentally pricks her finger on a rose bush. She's off to find the Royal Physician. She doesn't find him but she does find Rose's father. He hasn't seen Rose or the Physician. Rose and The Queen trade places a few times in the story until it is decided that Rose will not permanently change places with The Queen. Her family would m Rose wakes up feeling royal. The Queen emerges from Roses' room a few minutes later. She finds Rose's mother and asks after Rose. Mother hasn't seen her and The Queen accidentally pricks her finger on a rose bush. She's off to find the Royal Physician. She doesn't find him but she does find Rose's father. He hasn't seen Rose or the Physician. Rose and The Queen trade places a few times in the story until it is decided that Rose will not permanently change places with The Queen. Her family would miss her too much. But after dinner, Rose finds herself feeling scary. A bit long for storytime. A wonderful addition to the "princess-type" books.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Adorable story about make-believe, dressing up, and trading places (or not). Would Rose rather be Rose (who has to clean her room, but gets stories read to her) or the Queen of France (who never has to clean anything, but has no one to kiss her better)? Same illustrator as A Visitor for Bear. Adorable story about make-believe, dressing up, and trading places (or not). Would Rose rather be Rose (who has to clean her room, but gets stories read to her) or the Queen of France (who never has to clean anything, but has no one to kiss her better)? Same illustrator as A Visitor for Bear.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Audra

    This is a very pretty book - pink and sparkly. While the storyline was sweet, the back-and-forth from Rose being herself and the Queen of France was confusing for my child. I did have to read carefully to keep up with who she is when. The language of the adults sounded like the child, and vice-versa. Cute idea, but not so artfully written in my opinion. I had to go back and give this book another star b/c my child keeps asking for it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Malissa

    The Queen of France is a sweet story about a little girl playing dress-up/make-believe. She feels royal when she wakes in the morning so she dresses as the Queen of France. She is tempted to want to be the Queen of France, since she doesn't have to clean her room, etc. until she hears how much her parents would miss her. Sweet.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    An endearing story. I appreciated Rose and her imagination. I really appreciated her parents, who were willing to meet her at her own level and 'play along' without it feeling like they were 'playing along'. Every child should have parents like these. Finally, I appreciated the wonderful illustrations by Canadian artist, Kady MacDonald Denton.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Thuy

    very imaginative girl, who has parents that encourage and support her imagination. it might get confusing for the little ones but if its read over and over again with the child really seeing the pictures, perhaps it will be understood in what character the little girl is and what personality she is talking about.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lkking

    Picture book. This is a great story about a girl who alternates between her own personality and being the Queen of France. The interaction between parents and child is gentle, humorous and empowering to the child.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heidi-Marie

    Not bad. I enjoy Rose's imagination and how her parents play along. I also like that she takes responsibility and cleans her room as her mom had mentioned earlier. Fun to see her dress up. I supposed this would be best as a lap-read or on a child's own. Not sure I could make it work in a storytime.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)

    Rose has an alter ego the Queen of France. Sometimes she is Rose and sometimes she is the Queen of France. Her parents support her creative imagination amazingly well. Fun illustrations and a fun story.

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