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A little more than 50 years ago, in 1955, Ali AkbarKhan issued an LP called Music of India: Morning and Evening Ragas, with spoken introduction by violinist Yehudi Menuhin. Until then, Indian music was terra incognita in the West. When the same album was reissued as a CD in 1995, under the title Then and Now,it was nominated for a Grammy. In the last 50 years, there has bee A little more than 50 years ago, in 1955, Ali AkbarKhan issued an LP called Music of India: Morning and Evening Ragas, with spoken introduction by violinist Yehudi Menuhin. Until then, Indian music was terra incognita in the West. When the same album was reissued as a CD in 1995, under the title Then and Now,it was nominated for a Grammy. In the last 50 years, there has been the explosive influence of Indian music and culture in the West. Words such as karma, yoga, raga, nirvana, all once unknown here, have entered the language. Most famously, the wonders of the Indian musical world were spread by George Harrison and the Beatles. The music also had a profound effect on Mickey Hart and the Grateful Dead, John McLaughlin (Mahavishnu Orchestra), the Byrds, John Coltrane, and many others. The annus mirabilis 1967 saw the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi spreading the wonders of transcendental meditation, Swami Prabhupada founding the International Society for Krishna Consciousness in New York City, and the growing influence of Ravi Shankar. Four years later, George Harrison organized the groundbreaking Concert for Bangladesh, the first charity event of rock. Shankar had already wowed audiences at the Monterey Pop Festival, and he achieved stardom at the Madison Square Garden event. (Where Westerners, new to the sounds they heard, applauded after the musicians had finished tuning their instruments!) Peter Lavezzoli, a Buddhist and a musician, has a rare ability to articulate the personal feeling of music, and at the same time narrate a history. Lavezzoli has interviewed more than a score of musicians, such as Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, David Crosby, Philip Glass, Zakir Hussain, Mickey Hart, Zubin Mehta, and John McLaughlin.


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A little more than 50 years ago, in 1955, Ali AkbarKhan issued an LP called Music of India: Morning and Evening Ragas, with spoken introduction by violinist Yehudi Menuhin. Until then, Indian music was terra incognita in the West. When the same album was reissued as a CD in 1995, under the title Then and Now,it was nominated for a Grammy. In the last 50 years, there has bee A little more than 50 years ago, in 1955, Ali AkbarKhan issued an LP called Music of India: Morning and Evening Ragas, with spoken introduction by violinist Yehudi Menuhin. Until then, Indian music was terra incognita in the West. When the same album was reissued as a CD in 1995, under the title Then and Now,it was nominated for a Grammy. In the last 50 years, there has been the explosive influence of Indian music and culture in the West. Words such as karma, yoga, raga, nirvana, all once unknown here, have entered the language. Most famously, the wonders of the Indian musical world were spread by George Harrison and the Beatles. The music also had a profound effect on Mickey Hart and the Grateful Dead, John McLaughlin (Mahavishnu Orchestra), the Byrds, John Coltrane, and many others. The annus mirabilis 1967 saw the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi spreading the wonders of transcendental meditation, Swami Prabhupada founding the International Society for Krishna Consciousness in New York City, and the growing influence of Ravi Shankar. Four years later, George Harrison organized the groundbreaking Concert for Bangladesh, the first charity event of rock. Shankar had already wowed audiences at the Monterey Pop Festival, and he achieved stardom at the Madison Square Garden event. (Where Westerners, new to the sounds they heard, applauded after the musicians had finished tuning their instruments!) Peter Lavezzoli, a Buddhist and a musician, has a rare ability to articulate the personal feeling of music, and at the same time narrate a history. Lavezzoli has interviewed more than a score of musicians, such as Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, David Crosby, Philip Glass, Zakir Hussain, Mickey Hart, Zubin Mehta, and John McLaughlin.

43 review for The Dawn of Indian Music in the West

  1. 4 out of 5

    Praveen Kumar

    A comprehensive book, with fine details, individual opinions, and analysis.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    This book is tremendous in the level of detail it takes and the degree to which it explores every connection that Western Music has made with Indian Classical Music in the 20th century. And given that most of the interaction has been happening in the last century or so, its really almost a history of all the interactions, save that of some classical composers. But other than that Lavezolli covers it all. Most of this book is excellent and very engaging, but some parts tend to drag. I thought the This book is tremendous in the level of detail it takes and the degree to which it explores every connection that Western Music has made with Indian Classical Music in the 20th century. And given that most of the interaction has been happening in the last century or so, its really almost a history of all the interactions, save that of some classical composers. But other than that Lavezolli covers it all. Most of this book is excellent and very engaging, but some parts tend to drag. I thought the chapter Karuna Supreme just would not end. Another drawback was the book was redundant at parts. Several chapters were clearly based in large part on the interviews the author conducted, which would be included at the end of every chapter. In some cases the interviews offer insight on the chapter and vice versa, but in many cases Lavezolli will write something in the chapter which is represented directly in the interview. This left me with the feeling at times that 'Ugh, why am I reading this twice?' which shifted to a feeling later in the book 'This'll probably be in the interview again...' Other then those two things I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    5 Track

    dense but informative

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nolan Vallier

  5. 4 out of 5

    Habaneroman Webb

  6. 4 out of 5

    Louise Uy

  7. 4 out of 5

    KANCHI GV MATHIAZHAGAN

  8. 5 out of 5

    E

  9. 4 out of 5

    India

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  11. 5 out of 5

    Monali

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katja

  13. 5 out of 5

    Parag Waknis

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Shanker

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Hughes

  17. 4 out of 5

    mezza

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Campbell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pratik Rathor

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rashmi Shirke

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  23. 4 out of 5

    SUNY Potsdam College Libraries

  24. 4 out of 5

    todd

  25. 5 out of 5

    Max Hume

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Saurabh Verma

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lionel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  30. 4 out of 5

    Snanduk

  31. 5 out of 5

    Andy Deo

  32. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  33. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  34. 5 out of 5

    Subir Chowdhury

  35. 5 out of 5

    Augustine Paul

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sajit Bhaskaran

  38. 5 out of 5

    Tridib Kumar

  39. 5 out of 5

    Herry

  40. 5 out of 5

    Zabih

  41. 4 out of 5

    Shwethadevi Bhat

  42. 5 out of 5

    Debanjan Dhar

  43. 4 out of 5

    Onsetsu Evan Cordes

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