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Exploring the History and Philosophy of Christian Education: Principles for the Twenty-First Century

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An insightful look at the relationship between history and philosophy and how they impact Christian education from the Old Testament to the present. This volume begins with Old Testament history and moves forward to the present, showing the history and philosophy of Christian education in each era. It does so against the backdrop of wider philosophical thought and historic An insightful look at the relationship between history and philosophy and how they impact Christian education from the Old Testament to the present. This volume begins with Old Testament history and moves forward to the present, showing the history and philosophy of Christian education in each era. It does so against the backdrop of wider philosophical thought and historical events and shows how they shaped Christian education. Not only do the authors combine history and philosophy into one volume, they manage to present the information as relevant for today's Christian education.Written by two leading professors in the field of Christian educationIntegrates the history and philosophy of Christian education in one volumeIncludes numerous chartsProvides an ideal textbook for courses on both the history and philosophy of CE


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An insightful look at the relationship between history and philosophy and how they impact Christian education from the Old Testament to the present. This volume begins with Old Testament history and moves forward to the present, showing the history and philosophy of Christian education in each era. It does so against the backdrop of wider philosophical thought and historic An insightful look at the relationship between history and philosophy and how they impact Christian education from the Old Testament to the present. This volume begins with Old Testament history and moves forward to the present, showing the history and philosophy of Christian education in each era. It does so against the backdrop of wider philosophical thought and historical events and shows how they shaped Christian education. Not only do the authors combine history and philosophy into one volume, they manage to present the information as relevant for today's Christian education.Written by two leading professors in the field of Christian educationIntegrates the history and philosophy of Christian education in one volumeIncludes numerous chartsProvides an ideal textbook for courses on both the history and philosophy of CE

30 review for Exploring the History and Philosophy of Christian Education: Principles for the Twenty-First Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    If you're looking for a book that provides depth and careful analysis of the history and philosophy of education, this is not your book. If you need a summary of Western civilization that occasionally touches on educational issues, and also assumes that the reader needs great convincing that he or she ought to be reading this book, then you may find it helpful. (The last few chapters were an exception and were much better.) I found this book disappointing, but I (a history teacher who loves phil If you're looking for a book that provides depth and careful analysis of the history and philosophy of education, this is not your book. If you need a summary of Western civilization that occasionally touches on educational issues, and also assumes that the reader needs great convincing that he or she ought to be reading this book, then you may find it helpful. (The last few chapters were an exception and were much better.) I found this book disappointing, but I (a history teacher who loves philosophy) am apparently not part of the audience (reluctant undergrads who don't know much about Western civ?) that the authors had in mind.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Sexton

    This book was fairly helpful. It is mainly a very broad history of education from a Christian perspective. It is fairly easy to read, and it covers a lot of material. There are two main weaknesses of this book. The first weakness is its organization. It proceeds through the historical portion (probably 80-85% of the book, and then only briefly deals with the philosophy behind many historical movements. The philosophy should have been at the beginning so that the reader could properly deal with th This book was fairly helpful. It is mainly a very broad history of education from a Christian perspective. It is fairly easy to read, and it covers a lot of material. There are two main weaknesses of this book. The first weakness is its organization. It proceeds through the historical portion (probably 80-85% of the book, and then only briefly deals with the philosophy behind many historical movements. The philosophy should have been at the beginning so that the reader could properly deal with the historical movements and figures as they come along. The second weakness is some of the content. This is a fairly large book, and some of the content was just plain needless. For example, in the Reformation chapter, the author felt the need to take up 5 pages or so to reproduce Martin Luther's Ninety-Five Theses in its entirety. Why? It didn't make sense. In general, this book is helpful, but lacks a good bit in terms of actual analysis. It is mostly just a bare history of figures and events, with some relatively short comments in terms of evaluation at the end.

  3. 4 out of 5

    D.L. Johnson

    I think the book provides a good overarching (somewhat benign) view of religious education from Hebrew origins to Christian Education in the 21st century. The authors remark that Christian Education started with the earliest civilization with God as the instructor. The book's chapter on Developing a Personal Philosophy for Ministry is helpful to the practitioner. I would recommend the book to every undergraduate or master's level student in Christian Education. It's a book that is easy to read. I think the book provides a good overarching (somewhat benign) view of religious education from Hebrew origins to Christian Education in the 21st century. The authors remark that Christian Education started with the earliest civilization with God as the instructor. The book's chapter on Developing a Personal Philosophy for Ministry is helpful to the practitioner. I would recommend the book to every undergraduate or master's level student in Christian Education. It's a book that is easy to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dimas Castillo

    I got this book as a course requirement. It is a good book. Lots of historical facts. Great for research

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    I read this book for a class. Why else would anyone read this book? I am certain their are other reasons, but perhaps not many. The book is pretty well written. It reads smoothly too, which helps. The authors begin their examination of the history of of Christian Education in the Old Testament and Ancient Near East. Given that the Old Testament encompasses several thousand years of history, I found their examination too brief. A section on the New Testament and Apostolic Period comes next. Again, I read this book for a class. Why else would anyone read this book? I am certain their are other reasons, but perhaps not many. The book is pretty well written. It reads smoothly too, which helps. The authors begin their examination of the history of of Christian Education in the Old Testament and Ancient Near East. Given that the Old Testament encompasses several thousand years of history, I found their examination too brief. A section on the New Testament and Apostolic Period comes next. Again, the time frame covered is several hundred years and the section probably could have been better treated in three sections (one for the NT, one for the history of the church before Constantine, and one for the Apostolic period after Constantine). Why? The New Testament is Bible and should, in my opinion, be treated separately from other books of history. Then, the development of the church and discipleship remained steady until about 250AD when some changes began to occur methodologically. Then, Constantine set in motion major changes. With all this presented in one chapter it was difficult to track progression and changes in approach to Christian Education. Chapters for different periods of history follow. The information is good, though not always easy to follow in terms of development. One noteworthy observance is that few quotations come from original sources until the authors arrived in the 19th Century. Many quotes, the majority, are from other "history of Christian education" or " history of thought" type books. So, the extent to which this book only rehashes other theories is not clear, unless, of course, one has already read both original works and other histories like this one. The next to the last chapter is a very useful examination of philosophy beginning with the Greeks up to Post Modernism and the relation to those philosophies to educational philosophy. For those not familiar with these philosophies and philosophies of education (as I was not) will find this chapter very worthwhile! The final chapter is devoted to helping the reader develop his or her own philosophy of Christian education. For the size of the task undertaken, this is a valiant effort!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Bellinghausen

    Helpful for the history, mainly.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Zach Reynolds

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cory Kierkegaard

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  10. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dominica Palacio

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Humphrey

  13. 5 out of 5

    MuSyarrafah MuQarramah Sulaiman Kurdi

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Pandolph

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Crostreet

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joe Stewart

  19. 4 out of 5

    Riyan Littlefield

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zach

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chase Austin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Rose

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bekah Mason

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael faulkner

  26. 5 out of 5

    Drew Custer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Hamilton

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shadrack

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert Burgess

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leonard

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