counter create hit Worlds of Music: An Introduction to the Music of the World's Peoples - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Worlds of Music: An Introduction to the Music of the World's Peoples

Availability: Ready to download

Provides authoritative, accessible coverage of the world's music cultures. Based on the authors' fieldwork and expertise, this text presents in-depth explorations of several music cultures from around the world, with new chapters on China, Eastern Europe and the Arab world. The student-friendly, case-study approach and music-culture focus gives students a true sense of bot Provides authoritative, accessible coverage of the world's music cultures. Based on the authors' fieldwork and expertise, this text presents in-depth explorations of several music cultures from around the world, with new chapters on China, Eastern Europe and the Arab world. The student-friendly, case-study approach and music-culture focus gives students a true sense of both the music and the culture that created it.


Compare

Provides authoritative, accessible coverage of the world's music cultures. Based on the authors' fieldwork and expertise, this text presents in-depth explorations of several music cultures from around the world, with new chapters on China, Eastern Europe and the Arab world. The student-friendly, case-study approach and music-culture focus gives students a true sense of bot Provides authoritative, accessible coverage of the world's music cultures. Based on the authors' fieldwork and expertise, this text presents in-depth explorations of several music cultures from around the world, with new chapters on China, Eastern Europe and the Arab world. The student-friendly, case-study approach and music-culture focus gives students a true sense of both the music and the culture that created it.

30 review for Worlds of Music: An Introduction to the Music of the World's Peoples

  1. 4 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    Worlds of Music, by Jeff Todd Titon et al., was one of the original world music survey textbooks. I have known of it for a long time, but I hadn't looked at it until this past month when I read the 5th edition cover to cover for review. At the same time as I was reading Worlds of Music at home, I was also reading Excursions in World Music in the office. I had no special purpose in reading both of these at the same time (I'm about to move, and am trying to work through some of the remaining "to-r Worlds of Music, by Jeff Todd Titon et al., was one of the original world music survey textbooks. I have known of it for a long time, but I hadn't looked at it until this past month when I read the 5th edition cover to cover for review. At the same time as I was reading Worlds of Music at home, I was also reading Excursions in World Music in the office. I had no special purpose in reading both of these at the same time (I'm about to move, and am trying to work through some of the remaining "to-read" shelf before I go), but as it turns out it was interesting to read them side by side--primarily because these two textbooks are more similar to each other than to any of the other textbooks I've reviewed for world music survey. In fact, they are so alike that I wonder why they are both needed. The good parts of each could easily be brought together to make a textbook that is superior to either one alone. It seems a little silly that instructors have to somehow choose between these two books. That is not, however, the way that publishers think, so we have two very similar textbooks available for the same kind of undergraduate course. Here are some of the things I liked, and some of the disappointments, in Worlds of Music.The good. The best feature of Worlds of Music, and the feature that sets it apart from Excursions in World Music, is the musicians' biographies that appear in most of the chapters. These personal life histories, often taken from interviews conducted by the chapter author, are insightful, sometimes humorous, and thoroughly interesting. They bring the study of musical traditions down to a personal level, reminding the reader/student that music is made by real people, making difficult decisions. I really liked these biographies, and I would recommend even a stronger focus on them in future editions.Individual chapters included focuses that I enjoyed. For example, the chapter on Indian musical traditions focused on South Indian Carnatic traditions, where many introductions to Indian classical music tend to give more attention to North Indian Hindustani music. The diagram of gamelan instruments, on page 304, was very useful--far better than verbal descriptions of the instruments.I always like to see what musics each textbook includes that aren't included anywhere else. Worlds of Music hits most of "the usual suspects" (though Japan, which is one of the standards, is available online only), and also looks at the blues in North America, musics in rural Poland, and a full (and very interesting) chapter on musics in Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. The biggest surprise of all for me was the section about Chinese Christian music (405-408). That was really nicely done, and would be a good discussion starter in class. The book ends with a chapter on doing basic ethnographic fieldwork. This chapter would most certainly need a good instructor to guide the students, but there were some good tips on participant-observation, interviewing, and other aspects of field research. The danger in a chapter like that is talking about technology, and I wonder if in 2008 anyone was actually still using cassettes. Things have definitely changed since then, too. Best to be very general when mentioning equipment.The bad. Some of the chapters include activities, like instructions for making an instrument. This is an interesting idea, but not one I would've been interested in assigning in the undergrad survey classes I taught. Also, because these activities only appear in a few chapters, it's uneven. If there was one activity in each chapter, then it would be an easier decision to try all or some, as the class progresses.As with any general survey textbook, the sheer amount of information in each chapter is overwhelming, and for the reader it becomes difficult to stay focused and interested in one chapter after another. I don't imagine I would be able to work through the entire book in a one-semester course, and so then I have to start figuring how much of the book I would use, compared to its per-student cost (can it really be possible that the textbook + CD set costs $329.95, as currently listed on Amazon.com??). It's a pretty decent book, but I couldn't ask students to pay hundreds of dollars for it.As I read this book, I felt again that there is no single intro survey textbook that can be exactly what I'm looking for. One reason is that I'm less convinced of the rightness of isolating music as the primary object of study. All of the creative arts are so interconnected, it seems almost artificial to prefer music. As one author in the book wrote, "the musical sounds alone on our first recording would not inform us that this is a scene from a wedding" (209). Exactly! So why are we isolating music, even to the point of including only the audio from a video recording? I also question more and more Titon's assertion that "ethnomusicologists believe there is no such reality as 'the music itself'--that is, music apart from cultural considerations" (xviii). That belief has served ethnomusicology well for decades, but I often wonder if it blinds us to other interesting observations, and separates us too much from other researchers pursuing different directions in understanding music.My final verdict is that Worlds of Music (5th edition) is decent, better in some ways that its most similar counterpart, Excursions in World Music, but not the book for me if I teach an undergrad-level world music survey course.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zena V.

    Didn't read all of it, but I think all that was left were a couple chapters we didn't take up in class. Very informative, really detailed text. Gives you a good sense of what the music is like, and breaks down the songs alongside the text in much detail. Didn't read all of it, but I think all that was left were a couple chapters we didn't take up in class. Very informative, really detailed text. Gives you a good sense of what the music is like, and breaks down the songs alongside the text in much detail.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Annalisa

  4. 4 out of 5

    Viola

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jorie A Doyle

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Unterseh-Schreder

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Denton

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rowan Elkasas

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cristóbal Vogúmil Abellán de la Rosa

  12. 5 out of 5

    timothy mclendon

  13. 4 out of 5

    Troy Sargent

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alison Furlong

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nassia T

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan Graser

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Hammond

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  19. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Dalton

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pat Muchmore

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hiren

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bill Mcconnell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Allie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony Dumas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Thies

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tina Grove

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bill Benzon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jon Riddle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.