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Praise for THOU SHALL PROSPER "Rabbi Daniel Lapin's wisdom has helped untold numbers of people, including me, grow in our business, family, and spiritual lives. In Thou Shall Prosper, Rabbi Lapin has done it again. This book tells it like it is in a helpful, honest, hopeful, informative way. He offers valid, useful information based on ancient wisdom and modern experience Praise for THOU SHALL PROSPER "Rabbi Daniel Lapin's wisdom has helped untold numbers of people, including me, grow in our business, family, and spiritual lives. In Thou Shall Prosper, Rabbi Lapin has done it again. This book tells it like it is in a helpful, honest, hopeful, informative way. He offers valid, useful information based on ancient wisdom and modern experience." -Zig Ziglar, author and motivational teacher "Is it practical to apply spiritual lessons to the hardheaded world of business? In this potentially life-changing book, Rabbi Daniel Lapin proves that it's impractical not to use those lessons-and to bring ancient, timeless wisdom to contemporary problems. This unique approach provides an organized, supremely useful view of the world, combining common sense and unexpected, even startling insight. No matter how successful or sophisticated you may be, this remarkable work will enrich your understanding of the important, exciting process of building wealth." -Michael Medved, nationally syndicated radio host and author of Hollywood vs. America "Rabbi Daniel Lapin is a light unto the nations. A risk-taking rabbi of immense wisdom, his books have already influenced countless Jews and non-Jews with the eternal truths of the Hebrew Bible. Now, in this highly insightful and controversial new book, Rabbi Lapin unearths the golden nuggets of Jewish business genius. By emphasizing the unique talents of the Jewish way of life, Rabbi Lapin demonstrates how Judaism's spiritual regimen can be translated into tangible material rewards, with the bottom line being directly affected. A thoroughly engaging, enriching, and thought-provoking book." -Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, author of Kosher Sex and Judaism for Everyone "Rabbi Lapin is an unorthodox Orthodox rabbi. He understands the Biblical nature of economic freedom as well as he understands the Bible: uniquely well. Prosperity must have a purpose and Rabbi Lapin explores the wellsprings of the Judeo-Christian heritage to elucidate those purposes. In so doing, he also illuminates the road to greater prosperity for all. I really enjoyed this book and I heartily recommend it to people of all faiths." -The Honorable Jack Kemp


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Praise for THOU SHALL PROSPER "Rabbi Daniel Lapin's wisdom has helped untold numbers of people, including me, grow in our business, family, and spiritual lives. In Thou Shall Prosper, Rabbi Lapin has done it again. This book tells it like it is in a helpful, honest, hopeful, informative way. He offers valid, useful information based on ancient wisdom and modern experience Praise for THOU SHALL PROSPER "Rabbi Daniel Lapin's wisdom has helped untold numbers of people, including me, grow in our business, family, and spiritual lives. In Thou Shall Prosper, Rabbi Lapin has done it again. This book tells it like it is in a helpful, honest, hopeful, informative way. He offers valid, useful information based on ancient wisdom and modern experience." -Zig Ziglar, author and motivational teacher "Is it practical to apply spiritual lessons to the hardheaded world of business? In this potentially life-changing book, Rabbi Daniel Lapin proves that it's impractical not to use those lessons-and to bring ancient, timeless wisdom to contemporary problems. This unique approach provides an organized, supremely useful view of the world, combining common sense and unexpected, even startling insight. No matter how successful or sophisticated you may be, this remarkable work will enrich your understanding of the important, exciting process of building wealth." -Michael Medved, nationally syndicated radio host and author of Hollywood vs. America "Rabbi Daniel Lapin is a light unto the nations. A risk-taking rabbi of immense wisdom, his books have already influenced countless Jews and non-Jews with the eternal truths of the Hebrew Bible. Now, in this highly insightful and controversial new book, Rabbi Lapin unearths the golden nuggets of Jewish business genius. By emphasizing the unique talents of the Jewish way of life, Rabbi Lapin demonstrates how Judaism's spiritual regimen can be translated into tangible material rewards, with the bottom line being directly affected. A thoroughly engaging, enriching, and thought-provoking book." -Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, author of Kosher Sex and Judaism for Everyone "Rabbi Lapin is an unorthodox Orthodox rabbi. He understands the Biblical nature of economic freedom as well as he understands the Bible: uniquely well. Prosperity must have a purpose and Rabbi Lapin explores the wellsprings of the Judeo-Christian heritage to elucidate those purposes. In so doing, he also illuminates the road to greater prosperity for all. I really enjoyed this book and I heartily recommend it to people of all faiths." -The Honorable Jack Kemp

30 review for Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Yael Winston

    In the spirit of the 8th habit review I posted in 2009, I am posting a super-thorough review of TSP piecemeal, as I am almost sure it will be too long to post in its entirety. Here is my synopsis of the first chapter: The First Commandment: Believe in the Dignity and Morality of Business “Making money is much harder to do if, deep down, you suspect it to be a morally reprehensible activity” (17). The idea that making money is an inherently noble act is a definitive characteristic of Judaism and one In the spirit of the 8th habit review I posted in 2009, I am posting a super-thorough review of TSP piecemeal, as I am almost sure it will be too long to post in its entirety. Here is my synopsis of the first chapter: The First Commandment: Believe in the Dignity and Morality of Business “Making money is much harder to do if, deep down, you suspect it to be a morally reprehensible activity” (17). The idea that making money is an inherently noble act is a definitive characteristic of Judaism and one that Lapin considers most directly related to Jewish success. In this belief Judaism stands out; popular culture in the United States paints business professionals as greedy and selfish, believing that the government and non-profits help poor people more than private enterprise. But the assumptions that business is immoral and exclusively self-serving are simply not true. Feel Virtuous, Grow Wealthy “For better or worse, humans are holistic” (18). For this reason, in order to prosper, one must believe that business is a noble undertaking. If business people believe deep down that they are “swindling rogue[s]” (21) by virtue of being in business for profit, they will eventually be unable to prosper. Guilt is not much of a motivator in any situation, and by feeling shame regarding one’s profession, one loses important opportunities to develop and express the passion and enthusiasm necessary to feel pride and communicate it to others (i.e. to network). In addition, the call of conscience gets weaker each time it is ignored. If business people believe deep down that their acts are immoral per se, committing acts that are actually immoral (i.e. swindling like a rogue) becomes that much easier. Opportunities arise in business that allow for dishonest and often illegal behavior in order to get ahead, but Lapin insists that if one believes one’s undertakings to be inherently good, one will be more likely to refuse to commit unsavory acts. Money is Holy, and Holidays are Linked to Money Chanukah is a reminder that the pursuit of money is noble and wise. Jewish tradition dictates that Chanukah lights be used for no other purpose than their symbolic use; Chanukah lights must be lit in a well-lit room, so that no one is dependent on them for a utilitarian purpose such as seeing. The Chanukah lights also symbolize the joys of learning; to see the light is to understand. Further, Chanukah traditions call for giving money as gifts, especially to children, so that the link between learning and money is cemented from an early age. Jews Became Bankers to Help Others, Not as a Last Resort A popular misconception in Jewish and European history is that Jews became bankers as a result of anti-Semitism, which barred them from joining artisans’ guilds or farming. Because of this supposed prohibition, the Jews of the medieval era went into moneylending as the only way open to them to survive. Lapin challenges this notion, claiming that Jews actually went into finance because they saw it to be a benign and beneficial undertaking. Jewish tradition values charity and considers lending money to others to be superior to giving it, as a loan confirms the recipient as a competent being capable of repayment and a gift gives the recipient the status of a beggar. Plus, in a pre-electronic era, trustworthiness in transferring wealth was crucial to banking. Jewish bankers distinguished themselves by being trustworthy in transferring funds across Europe. “When a merchant in Venice gave a sum of money to a local Jewish banker, the merchant could rest assured that his supplier in Amsterdam would receive the equivalent funds from another Jewish banker in Holland” (25). Another aid to Jewish bankers was Judaism’s rather liberal interpretation of the prohibition of charging interest to borrowers. Judaism’s approach, affirmed by the oral Torah (the Torah given to Moses as he spent 40 days on Mt. Sinai, whose teachings are in line with its written counterpart), validates charging fair interest for use of funds but describes in no uncertain terms the evils of usury. (Christianity and Islam, by contrast, follow a strict interpretation of holy writings that prohibit charging any sort of interest.) Because Jewish tradition believed moneylending to be positive and helpful, “[Jews] were not only willing to become bankers; they were proud and eager to do so” (26, emphasis in original). Gold is Good: God Said So Lapin cites several examples from the Torah that declare material wealth to be not only acceptable but in fact divinely good. The first comes in the opening passages of the Torah, in which it is written, “The gold of that land is good” (B’resheet/Genesis 2:12). Jewish prayers often contain requests for prosperity, with prosperity seen as a likely result of being trustworthy and meeting the needs of others. “It is perfectly kosher to ask God for money….What you are really asking for is the opportunity to serve your fellow human beings” (27). Another helpful Torah story is that of Passover, in which God commanded Israelite slaves escaping Egypt to request gold and silver from their Egyptian oppressors. God was not urging the Hebrews to leave with nothing but the clothes on their backs; God most likely commanded this action because God believed it was high time the children of Israel got paid handsomely for their toil. “Charity is Good; Business is Selfish”—A Popular Misconception This is a new and refreshing perspective: Lapin cites examples of several well-known business professionals who also contribute substantial amounts to charitable causes. Then he points out that society tends to view these contributions more positively than those completed in the business arena, but why? Business, he asserts, does as much or more to benefit society as charitable work does. You Can’t Earn an Honest Living Without Pleasing Others “To really succeed in whatever is the business of your choice, you have to come to understand and utterly absorb into your being the fundamentally true idea that your activities in your business are virtuous and moral, provided of course that you conduct your business affairs honestly and honorably” (32, emphasis in original). Few people who make charitable donations have scruples about their behavior as it is “for a good cause.” Indeed, jihadists, eco-terrorists and anti-choice activists who bomb abortion clinics all believe they are acting with integrity even while committing heinous acts. Why, then, do many business professionals feel as if they are doing a morally questionable act when they build businesses that look after their families, stimulate the economy, create jobs and spread prosperity to greater and greater numbers of people? How We Are All Persuaded That Business is Evil “Increasing numbers of Americans view wealth not as the morally legitimate rewards of risk, innovation, and effort, but as an unjust and morally suspect outcome” (33). This persuasion comes from several sources, including the media, educational institutions, and the business world itself. (My own interjection: it’s ironic that this image is propagated in a country so enthusiastic about capitalism, as it almost sounds Communist.) How We Are Taught That Business is Bad, From Early Education Educational institutions, according to Lapin, teach kids that making money is an inherently bad thing, regardless of the path one chooses to wealth. Who would dare to voice an aspiration to be a business professional, in an environment in which such a thing is at worst cruel and illegal and at best morally ambiguous? Movies and Television Conspire to Make you Poor The messages of the bulk of movies and television shows portray the business professional as rabidly greedy, dishonest, narcissistic, and heartless. The trend started in the 1970s; though Lapin does not cite a reason for the shift, he points out that in the 1930s and ‘40s, the businessmen of the movies (and yes, they were men) were usually portrayed favorably. After all, Jimmy Stewart’s character in It’s a Wonderful Life was a banker! Early television depictions of businessmen in the 1950s and ‘60s did the same. One would be hard-pressed to name what, exactly, the sitcom fathers of that family-centered television era actually did, but the understanding was that they were wise, family-oriented, and earning a living in some sort of respectable business. (Ozzie Nelson was an advertising executive, though this is stated only in the movie pilot, and Ward Cleaver was most likely either an ad exec or an accountant—dangerous business for a respectable television family man today!) Contrast these characters to Gordon Gekko in Wall Street or PG & E in Erin Brokovich. Why, business, especially big business, blackmails politicians, poisons innocent (especially poor) people, hires assassins to eliminate troublesome opponents…and one scorned corporate mogul tries to kill Spiderman! On the small screen, Dallas may be dead but the J.R. Ewing character just keeps coming back to life. The classic Family Ties found much of its humor in the silly notion that profit-seeking was a desirable undertaking; the parents, ex-hippies who seemed to have left the commune without a backward glance, frequently found themselves at odds with their kids, especially their oldest son, because “Make Love, Not War” meant less to the kids than “Make Money Above All Else.” (In one episode, father and son are having a conversation where the son expresses pride in his father, who works at a non-profit public television station. But here is the joke: Alex P. Keaton tells father Steven that he couldn’t be prouder of his father if he had worked in a bank. Poor Alex is so misguided that he thinks banking is just as noble as non-profit work!) Though consumers of these types of media know it’s fiction, some of that message must inevitably be absorbed and believed. (Note: The examples of Leave it to Beaver, the Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, Erin Brokovich, Dallas, and Family Ties are my own examples; Lapin uses several in addition to the ones I have included.) We Can’t Help Believing Some of What People Tell Us To prove the point that we inevitably absorb messages as true even when they are proved false, Lapin offers the story from the Tanak’h of King David and his best friend’s son, Mephiboshet. Ever loyal to his deceased best friend, David grants his son all of his father’s estate, and in turn the son pledges his loyalty to King David. When a rebellion breaks out, Mephiboshet’s steward lies and tells David that Mephiboshet was part of the plot; David then awards Mephiboshet’s estate to the scheming steward. Once the steward’s deception is made known, David tells Mephiboshet he and the steward can share the estate, but Mephiboshet instead gives it up. Talmud scholars throughout the ages have debated David’s failure in judgment, but some believe that David was never able to completely believe that Mephiboshet was guiltless. Because he had believed Mephiboshet to be unfaithful, he never could erase the idea from his mind. “You may think that you can remain uninfluenced by the things you hear, but it just isn’t so” (40). Many People Believe That Business is Inherently Bad Partly as a result of education and media, a belief has spread throughout our culture that business is a zero-sum game. If a business is profitable, it must be so at the expense of another or a group of anothers; conceiving of a business reality where both companies and the public benefit has become increasingly difficult. For the most part, the handful of people who champion business do not promote it as an innately good thing, free of vice per se, but instead insist that business is motivated by greed. But contrary to eons of thought, greed is actually a good thing. The only thing is, greed isn’t a good thing. Greed destroys people, and deep down, all people who listen even occasionally to the call of conscience know that. “Foolishly claiming that business is about greed merely confirms the growing cultural conviction that business is, at root, fundamentally immoral—that even if commerce may be necessary for a healthy economy, it is a necessary evil” (42). Popular Culture Supports Immoral “Love”: Money is Bad, but Sex is Good? I especially like this section, as Lapin points out that society has a high tolerance for adultery but almost none for certain business practices. To illustrate the point, he cites two articles that ran in the mid-nineties in the mainstream publications People and Newsweek. The first, in People, was a Valentine’s Day issue about great love stories in the 20th century, including Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, and King Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson. Unfortunately, at least one partner in each of these couplings was married to someone else at the time. A few weeks later, Newsweek ran a story about “Corporate Killers” who have eliminated jobs in their companies, resulting in greater profits. High in emotion but low in evidence, the author talked about the pain that workers went through as a result of losing their jobs. “Depending on your outlook, you might feel that the actions of Newsweek’s featured CEOs, the Corporate Killers of the article, were indeed evil. Or, you might be among those who feel they were doing what was necessary to ensure their companies’ survival and the preservation of many more jobs that would have been lost had the companies foundered” (43). Compare the pain of a layoff, which may result in financial hardship but may also result in a new and better job, with the pain of adultery. Though it is hard for anyone who has never experienced having an unfaithful spouse to make the call, it makes sense that adultery would be far more painful than job loss. Humans are not Just “Smart Animals” Immoral sexual behavior is easy to excuse if one views the human race as simply the most evolved species of animal. After all, many species of animal engage in sexual behavior, but business is uniquely human. Cheating on a spouse is “natural” if one sees oneself as a particularly intelligent animal rather than as a unique being set apart by God, as one is simply responding to one’s hormonal impulses as animals do. But much of human behavior is based on overcoming nature, not succumbing to it. Humans obey “nature’s call” when they feel it, but all but the youngest members of society usually find a bathroom in order to do so. (And most parents try to teach their children the bathroom concept as quickly as possible.) No animal species engages in religious practice, either, which Lapin sees as proof that both business and religion fulfill a higher spiritual need unique to people. But for some reason, fulfilling this higher need through business (and often through religion) brings censure. “It is almost as if the culture yearns to tear down anyone whose activities suggest that there is more to life than the material” (47). Even Business Professionals Themselves Have Given Up the Fight Business students and business professionals are not doing anything to refute the idea that business is inherently sleazy, and in fact are stoking the fires. The language used to refer to business is indicative of how far business has fallen, and I like this quote so much I’m going to increase the font size to point it out: “It is precisely by taking control of language that ideas can gradually be changed” (48). Lapin cites two examples: the IRS’s use of the phrase “unearned income” to describe interest, dividends and capital gains (as if the financial discipline and smarts necessary to EARN each of these did not exist), and the use of the phrase “giving back to society” to describe charity work. (To this I might also add the use of the word “girl” to describe grown women—it relegates women to the status of perpetual children and thus strips them of rights and privileges reserved for adults, particularly self-determination). If non-profit work “gives back” to society, the implication is that for-profit work does not, and in fact takes something away. Lapin uses the example of Bill Gates, who gives large donations to charitable causes but receives criticism for not giving a larger portion of his substantial wealth away. But doesn’t his software, which makes communication and business functioning much smoother, also “give” to society? Prisoners are paying debts to society because they did, in fact, take from it. With this sort of language it is clear that business has become synonymous with crime. How Starbucks Does Good Works—Every Day Starbucks serves as an example of a business that does good works while earning a profit, but instead of appreciating “good works” as providing a pleasant atmosphere, compensating employees well, and bringing prosperity to stockholders, Starbucks touts volunteer work and charitable giving. Though the company has much to be proud of in their charitable works, the tone of their literature is almost apologetic: “Please accept our humble apologies for making large profits and take our charitable work as a peace offering.” Bain Consultants Can Transfer to “Morally Uplifting” Work Bain and Company is another example of a company not seeing the good in its own work. The company has started a division that provides low-cost consultation services to non-profit organizations. Company employees have the option of leaving the for-profit sector of the business to work in the non-profit sector, and many choose to do so even though they have to take 20 to 80 percent pay cuts. This time in the non-profit sector is called a “morally uplifting break” (51), with the not-so-subtle indication that the for-profit sector is morally tainted. “If such sophisticated professionals can fall victim to this sad mistake, I must assume that on some level everyone is being subtly indoctrinated” (51). Most People Work “in Business”—And There’s Nothing Wrong With That! Nearly everyone earns his or her living through some form of business, whether one is a business owner, an employee, a sub-contractor, et cetera. In order to succeed that any of these business behaviors, each person must view himself as a business professional in a noble, honorable undertaking. If there is even a little doubt that one’s business behavior is not morally upright, success becomes nearly impossible. Your Path to Prosperity • “Begin embracing these two related notions: (1) You are in business, and (2) the occupation of business is moral, noble, and worthy.” • “Offer to write a short column or op-ed piece for your local newspaper that would forthrightly declare the profession of business to be moral and noble, and explain why.” • “Read business non-fiction regularly.” • “While reading, watching television, or seeing a movie, remain on high alert for subtle (and not-so-subtle) swipes at the dignity and the morality of business” (pp.52-53).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Thou Shall Prosper came highly recommended by a friend. It was a huge disappointment. None of the advice in the book is wrong; it's just anodyne. Does anyone really need to be told that networking is good for business? Or that business, morally and properly conducted, is good for the world? Lapin's perspective as a Rabbi, is certainly interesting -- the best parts of the book are to be found in his stories about people he has known -- but the advice is nothing new. If you're incredibly neurotic Thou Shall Prosper came highly recommended by a friend. It was a huge disappointment. None of the advice in the book is wrong; it's just anodyne. Does anyone really need to be told that networking is good for business? Or that business, morally and properly conducted, is good for the world? Lapin's perspective as a Rabbi, is certainly interesting -- the best parts of the book are to be found in his stories about people he has known -- but the advice is nothing new. If you're incredibly neurotic and have a 3-year-old's attitude toward money (whatever that might be) then I suppose this book can help. But if you're reasonably sane and grown up, you won't find much that's new here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reepacheep

    I heard about this on Dave Ramsey's national radio program when he interviewed Daniel Lapin. An amazing book that addresses some of our culture's misconceptions about finances and business. This isn't a book about getting rich, it's a book about how we think about money and doing business. The author provides a rich historical background on how perceptions of money and finances have developed over the centuries. Daniel Lapin's writing is not dry and boring. On the contrary, this book, while appea I heard about this on Dave Ramsey's national radio program when he interviewed Daniel Lapin. An amazing book that addresses some of our culture's misconceptions about finances and business. This isn't a book about getting rich, it's a book about how we think about money and doing business. The author provides a rich historical background on how perceptions of money and finances have developed over the centuries. Daniel Lapin's writing is not dry and boring. On the contrary, this book, while appearing to be a text on finances, is written in a very engaging and conversational manner, with just the right touch of humor injected. After reading this book I feel that I have met Rabbi Lapin and we have some history together--but alas, he would not know me at all!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Even though the title dissuaded me from reading the book, I was intrigued based on hearing Dave Ramsey talk about it on his radio show. I actually liked the the first couple of chapters quite a bit, and they helped me shift my thinking about money in a positive way. However, I kind of slogged through the middle chapters. I think it could have been written more concisely, but in general would recommend it and would otherwise have given it four stars. The chapter about why you should give money awa Even though the title dissuaded me from reading the book, I was intrigued based on hearing Dave Ramsey talk about it on his radio show. I actually liked the the first couple of chapters quite a bit, and they helped me shift my thinking about money in a positive way. However, I kind of slogged through the middle chapters. I think it could have been written more concisely, but in general would recommend it and would otherwise have given it four stars. The chapter about why you should give money away is interesting and useful to read, even if you already do make a habit of regularly giving to your church and other charities. It is worth reading and provides interesting insights into one rabbi's perspective on the role of money in our lives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ReadingMama

    Rabbi Lapin was born into a prestigious Torah family and a Jewish scholar. At one point, he was appointed as a counselor to President Bush. In this book, he talks about money matters from the perspective of Torah! There are three key words in order to be successful 1) Learn 2) Understand and 3) Practice. In order to improve myself, I must put effort and invest in myself. A 75 years old Harvard study reveals the most important factor in human happiness is the relationship, mainly from close famil Rabbi Lapin was born into a prestigious Torah family and a Jewish scholar. At one point, he was appointed as a counselor to President Bush. In this book, he talks about money matters from the perspective of Torah! There are three key words in order to be successful 1) Learn 2) Understand and 3) Practice. In order to improve myself, I must put effort and invest in myself. A 75 years old Harvard study reveals the most important factor in human happiness is the relationship, mainly from close family, friends and social connections. In order to be successful in business, relationships with people are integral. Trust and characters are the best marketing tools and they are the GOLDEN STANDARD! Networking with lots of people and paying attention to each person; then establishing a good relationship with each individual. Think of a way how you can be helpful to others! Practice predictability: never impose your mood swings on your associates and customers. Standardization is another important factor. Before Holiday Inn, lodgers never knew what to expect from local lodgings; however the Holiday Inn hotel chain introduced a certain level of expectation of the hotel and people started travelling far to seek for that standard service. I can completely relate. Once I started travelling extensively, I kept on returning to the Hampton Inn because of the reasonable price, cleanness, friendly staff members and comfortable beds. Eventually, I became a gold member of Hilton, although now my preference is the Embassy Suits :-) Four motivational factors in personal growth and success of the business 1) Alway and continuously seek wisdom and knowledge 2) Acquire power to influence others 3) Financial freedom and 4) Respect from others! Wealth is a result, not the purpose itself. If you study the Bible (Torah), there are many examples of “Prosperity” ~ Gen 2:12 : The gold of that land is good ~ During the passover, God commanded Israelites slaves to request gold and silver from their Egyptian oppressors ~ Gen : Yours is the earth and everything in it. ~ Many biblical figures had achieved enormous wealth and they were the results from the intimate and interesting relationship with God and people ~ King David: First get rid of bad habits then replace them with good habits. ~ Making money is much harder to do if deep down you suspect it to be a morally reprehensible activity! ~ For better or not, humans are holistic: You must believe that business is noble undertaking!” 긴장감 많은 훈련, 즉 전쟁에서 훌륭한 리더는 발견된다. 왜냐면 혼동과 두려움때 리더십이 가장 필요하기 때문이다. 진정한 리더에겐 따라주는 사람들이 있다. 사람들이 따르려면, 인격적인 자제와 책임감이 중요한 요소이다. 그리고 리더는 대립을 두려워해서는 않된다. 탈무드에서 가르치는 부모의 자세: 신앙안에서 자녀를 키워라 Let them know your expectation 자녀들의 결혼을 도와라 독립할수있도록 일을 가르쳐라 수영을 가르쳐라 (세상의 어려운 소용돌이 속에서 살아남을수 있는 기술) 유대인들은 원하는 바를 얻으려면, 그것을 이미 쟁취한듯 행동한다. 신념이 사실보도 더 중요하기때문. 내가 아는것보다 더 중요한것은 내가 무엇을 믿는가이다. 긍적적인 생각은 품는것만으로는 충분하지 않다. 실제로 입밖으로 내야한다. 그것이 기도이다. 잘될수있다는 확신, 하나님이 나와 함께하신다는것 통성으로 기도할떄 실제 내 믿음이 된다. 좋은 연설가가 되려면, 좋은책을 큰소리로 읽어라. 우리가 행동을 바꾸면 감정도 따라오기 마련이다 (Fake it until you make it!) 변화는 인생에서 성공을 위해 꼭 필요하지만, 시간이 필요하다. 유대인들의 결혼식과 장례식은 7 일이다. 그동안 엄청난 변화를 소중한 사람들과 함께하면서 잘적응해낸다. 변화을 자연스레 받아드리되, 핵심 가치는 절대 버리지 말아라. 디즈니의 핵심가치 “건전한 오락” 나의 핵심가치 “Shineing Star, Phil 21518). 절대 은퇴하지마라. 끝까지 일하면서, 좋은일 많히 해라. 그게 장수의 비밀이다!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wilson

    Rabbi Daniel Lapin has written a book that I believe should be read by anyone who is in business, which means just about everyone! He tackles misconceptions such as it's okay to cold call people asking for donations to charity but to try and sell something door to door is much different. He explains if you believe in your product you should take the same pride in it if you are selling or soliciting for charity! Lapin challenges ten ideas that many people seem to hold. Such as money is bad. Money Rabbi Daniel Lapin has written a book that I believe should be read by anyone who is in business, which means just about everyone! He tackles misconceptions such as it's okay to cold call people asking for donations to charity but to try and sell something door to door is much different. He explains if you believe in your product you should take the same pride in it if you are selling or soliciting for charity! Lapin challenges ten ideas that many people seem to hold. Such as money is bad. Money itself is not bad, it's what we do with it. I know this is something I heard many times as I was growing up. I heard the Scripture of I Timothy 1:6 MISquoted to say "Money is the root of all evil", but if you read it in context it says "The LOVE of money is the root of all evil." That's a huge difference. Rabbi Lapin explains why money is neither moral nor immoral -- it just *is*. One thing I loved about this book is how he weaves Jewish ideas and concepts throughout its pages. It's not just a stereotype that Jewish people often have good business sense, Rabbi Lapin explains that many of the concepts he is presenting in this book are things that someone who is Jewish has likely learned, and he's teaching the rest of us. As someone who has studied Hebrew, I have a great respect for the Hebrew language which he occasionally explains a word to make a point. He also emphasizes the importance of giving to charity. Instantly I would think being a rabbi, he would back this up with Scripture, but he explains this has far reaching consequences It often empowers us to make more money, and we should give to charity even if we have no religious system. That, on the surface, seems like a oxymoron, giving to get, but he explains how many times business contacts are formed while doing community service even if you are not to actually form business deals there, you can pass along your business card and meet for lunch later!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Hamlin

    Clearly written and very interesting. Rabbi Lapin applies 10 spiritual principles to being prosperous. Although his overt purpose is to enhance one's business acumen, the principles apply to our personal life as well. His chapters on giving money to charity, never retiring, and believing in the dignity of business made me think about those topics in new ways and appreciate them even more. These principles apply to anyone who wants to live a moral life. You don't need to be Jewish to appreciate i Clearly written and very interesting. Rabbi Lapin applies 10 spiritual principles to being prosperous. Although his overt purpose is to enhance one's business acumen, the principles apply to our personal life as well. His chapters on giving money to charity, never retiring, and believing in the dignity of business made me think about those topics in new ways and appreciate them even more. These principles apply to anyone who wants to live a moral life. You don't need to be Jewish to appreciate it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Natalya

    One of the best books I have ever read. I would even put it in my number one spot, next to the bible. I would recommend this book to any one. It will change your concept of work business and money, something that our society sorely needs.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter Schmeltzer

    Very interesting. Might have changed some of my outlook on what retirement should be.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Leanne Hunt

    What an amazing book! I wish I had read this years ago, and that all my friends could read it now! The book basically sets out to describe the principles and habits which make Jewish people so good at business, and it does a mighty fine job. As a Christian, many of the lessons sounded familiar, and yet I found the approach totally refreshing. Whereas I had been conditioned to think of business and the whole area of making money as somewhat distasteful, Rabbi Daniel Lapin explains that it is an e What an amazing book! I wish I had read this years ago, and that all my friends could read it now! The book basically sets out to describe the principles and habits which make Jewish people so good at business, and it does a mighty fine job. As a Christian, many of the lessons sounded familiar, and yet I found the approach totally refreshing. Whereas I had been conditioned to think of business and the whole area of making money as somewhat distasteful, Rabbi Daniel Lapin explains that it is an entirely spiritual enterprise, stemming from God's earliest commandment to "Go forth and multiply; subdue the earth and make it prosper". I found the writing style very fluid and easy to read, and yet the content is by no means simplistic. The author draws on Biblical passages to explain the origins of various Jewish practices, and combines these with everyday examples of people who have successfully used them in business. Also, the book isn't confined to the matter of running a business; instead, it incorporates business into life as a whole. People need each other to get by, because one person can provide a skill while another provides resources and still another looks after things at home. The aspect of mutual support, good neighbourliness and moral responsibility is as important to making money as the aspect of watching the bottom line. There are even chapters on charitable giving and lifelong learning, which goes to show how comprehensive and far-reaching the lessons in the book are. In conclusion, this is a source of wisdom which I can highly recommend. It is certainly a valuable addition to my bookshelf and may well turn up in the odd Christmas stocking. Oh, and in case I haven't made it sufficiently clear, the material is carefully presented in a way that can be understood and appreciated by religious and secular readers alike, since it is ultimately about what works in business according to teachers, fathers, traders and leaders over thousands of years.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    I really liked this book. Rabbi Lapin does an excellent job pointing out common misconceptions that people have about business and money. A little preachy at times, but the man is a Rabbi. Favorite quotations from the book: “Take out a dollar bill and look at it. Now pat yourself on your back because you are looking at a certificate of performance.” “There’s no such thing as an entitlement because no one is entitled to anything. If you plan to live off of the generosity of your neighbors, it would I really liked this book. Rabbi Lapin does an excellent job pointing out common misconceptions that people have about business and money. A little preachy at times, but the man is a Rabbi. Favorite quotations from the book: “Take out a dollar bill and look at it. Now pat yourself on your back because you are looking at a certificate of performance.” “There’s no such thing as an entitlement because no one is entitled to anything. If you plan to live off of the generosity of your neighbors, it would behoove you to endear yourself to them so that they actually want to help you, because you do not have a right to anybody else’s money. Nobody does. There isn’t such a thing. We all have obligations but nobody in the Bible has a right to anything. The word doesn’t exist in Hebrew because it doesn’t exist in the world. When anyone coerces you to provide such a right, it is not charity by the very definition of charity, which is voluntary giving."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Acy

    Do not let the subtitle fool you, how to make money is a secondary purpose of this book. Actually Rabbi Lapin describes how if 'making money' is secondary to your purpose then wealth will occur more so than if it is your main objective. Written from the Jewish perspective on life and business, Thou Shall Prosper has taught me a great deal more than simply making money. The chapters on leadership and charity giving are extraordinary and uplifting in particular. The explanation of Hebrew texts exp Do not let the subtitle fool you, how to make money is a secondary purpose of this book. Actually Rabbi Lapin describes how if 'making money' is secondary to your purpose then wealth will occur more so than if it is your main objective. Written from the Jewish perspective on life and business, Thou Shall Prosper has taught me a great deal more than simply making money. The chapters on leadership and charity giving are extraordinary and uplifting in particular. The explanation of Hebrew texts explained in context give incredible insight into the traditions of Judaism and why its followers have been unusually successfully in business. This is undoubtably the best book I've read so far this year!

  13. 4 out of 5

    David

    Very good book. Rabbi Daniel Lapin effectively shares solid principles for building wealth through serving others. The book reading was very slow because of the type and content. Therefore, I ordered the audiobook and listened to the 17 hours of content. The content was good, but he elaborated much on some topics and I lost track of the initial purpose or chapter name. Here are just some of the principles I learned from the book: - Business is about serving others well - Getting paid for a job m Very good book. Rabbi Daniel Lapin effectively shares solid principles for building wealth through serving others. The book reading was very slow because of the type and content. Therefore, I ordered the audiobook and listened to the 17 hours of content. The content was good, but he elaborated much on some topics and I lost track of the initial purpose or chapter name. Here are just some of the principles I learned from the book: - Business is about serving others well - Getting paid for a job means it your work was meaningful to someone else - Life is a journey, not a destination - The Hebrew language does not have a word for retirement - Making money requires relationships

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Firstly if you are not of a Judeo-Christian world view then this book will be very difficult for you to read. However it is simply the best book in its class that i have ever read. I have always struggled with a desire for wealth, and have run my own business for almost a decade. I struggle even more with the jarring reality that i am indeed creating wealth and not exploiting others. This book lays it out concisely and clearly, something which no other book i have read on the topic to date has e Firstly if you are not of a Judeo-Christian world view then this book will be very difficult for you to read. However it is simply the best book in its class that i have ever read. I have always struggled with a desire for wealth, and have run my own business for almost a decade. I struggle even more with the jarring reality that i am indeed creating wealth and not exploiting others. This book lays it out concisely and clearly, something which no other book i have read on the topic to date has ever done.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I would recommend this book to anyone! The concepts in the book might be old and well-known to the Jewish people, but I think there are secret gems of wisdom for non-Jews. I found a few of the concepts revolutionary to my way of thinking in everyday life. For example, I now look at other people's wealth as a measurement of how much they have blessed other people. It's a beautiful and moral way of viewing money. I love Rabbi Lapin and now consider him my rabbi. I would recommend this book to anyone! The concepts in the book might be old and well-known to the Jewish people, but I think there are secret gems of wisdom for non-Jews. I found a few of the concepts revolutionary to my way of thinking in everyday life. For example, I now look at other people's wealth as a measurement of how much they have blessed other people. It's a beautiful and moral way of viewing money. I love Rabbi Lapin and now consider him my rabbi.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Lewis Kozoriz

    "...most people who learn how to make money inevitably learn how to improve their relationships with others." ~ Daniel Lapin, Thou Shall Prosper, p. 91 Daniel Lapin is a rabbi who shares insights into why Jews seem to prosper in proportionately to other races. He explains the myths and his insight into why this phenomenon exists and the 10 commandments for making money found in ancient wisdom. "...most people who learn how to make money inevitably learn how to improve their relationships with others." ~ Daniel Lapin, Thou Shall Prosper, p. 91 Daniel Lapin is a rabbi who shares insights into why Jews seem to prosper in proportionately to other races. He explains the myths and his insight into why this phenomenon exists and the 10 commandments for making money found in ancient wisdom.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    This had some very good pearls of wisdom and helped me shift some of my paradigms a bit (for example, away from thinking of business as evil). It was a bit dry, however, and probably would have stayed on my currently-reading list for a long time had it not had holds on it at the library. It also gave me information that piqued my curiosity of the Jewish people in general, so a plus there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tony Tovar

    This book covers ten commandments that all business entrepreneurs should know of if they are to succeed in business.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Byemanzi

    Very helpful book with simple principles to practice. I found the book a little repetitive though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Thomson

    Though twice as long as it needs to be, this book is packed with great arguments and examples of how Capitalism is good for the economy, society, and the individual. Lapin argues, I believe successfully, that economies grow when people are allowed to do what they do best for other people who need/want the product/service being provided. Society benefits because a business transaction requires cooperation, as opposed to Socialism which requires coercion. This cooperation spills over outside of th Though twice as long as it needs to be, this book is packed with great arguments and examples of how Capitalism is good for the economy, society, and the individual. Lapin argues, I believe successfully, that economies grow when people are allowed to do what they do best for other people who need/want the product/service being provided. Society benefits because a business transaction requires cooperation, as opposed to Socialism which requires coercion. This cooperation spills over outside of the marketplace as we see the value and humanity of those we work with and for. Finally, the individual benefits because they feel useful, providing something that someone else needs/wants, giving value to the individual who produces the product/service. Lapin also does a great job showing how the work someone does has intrinsic value, even outside of the product/service that the work results in. This book is for anyone who wants to understand what someone means when they say they are a Capitalist, which will fly in the face of the commonly held view that Capitalism is about the strong taking from the weak. You will find instead that Capitalism is about creating, not taking, and making the wealth pie bigger for everyone. Lapin reminds us of this by showing that even the poor in a Capitalist country are immensely better off than the poor in government run economies when looking at absolute, not relative, conditions.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    DNF. I read about halfway through this book. I was in Hobby Lobby shopping for stickers and, as is usual for me, I started talking to the other customers who were in the same aisle. A man recommended this book, saying that he had always thought of money as the root of all evil but he had read this book and now felt otherwise. I think a lot of people think of money as evil and it is not, so I was interested to read this book. I have to say that the beginning of the book is very interesting and ex DNF. I read about halfway through this book. I was in Hobby Lobby shopping for stickers and, as is usual for me, I started talking to the other customers who were in the same aisle. A man recommended this book, saying that he had always thought of money as the root of all evil but he had read this book and now felt otherwise. I think a lot of people think of money as evil and it is not, so I was interested to read this book. I have to say that the beginning of the book is very interesting and extremely well written. As The author got down into the weeds of Jewish beliefs and how that translates into their understanding of money. I found it very interesting but I found some of their beliefs very disturbing. Not that they were horrible, but just IMO something that could lead to a low self-esteem etc. Anyway the beliefs were just too far from my own for me to read the book and get much more out of it so I let it go. I would however recommend that you read it if you’re from a Judeo Christian background. If, like me, it’s hard to benefit from ideas based on beliefs that are very different from your own, I would recommend that you try books by Catherine Ponder which are also very good and Bible-based but not so much religion- based.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Minde Artman

    Are you ready for thorough explanation of God’s will for your finances? Rabbi Daniel Lapin will take you through the ten commandments for making money. He guides you to believe in the dignity and morality of business, to extend your network, to lead, to know your money and to act rich. One of the biggest mind shifts for me was his last commandment of “Never Retire.” This really is making me think about how we always have a calling to serve others and that one measure of our impact on others, tha Are you ready for thorough explanation of God’s will for your finances? Rabbi Daniel Lapin will take you through the ten commandments for making money. He guides you to believe in the dignity and morality of business, to extend your network, to lead, to know your money and to act rich. One of the biggest mind shifts for me was his last commandment of “Never Retire.” This really is making me think about how we always have a calling to serve others and that one measure of our impact on others, that God designed, is being paid for our work. I heard about this book while watching the Dave Ramsey Legacy Journey last year. He recommended it as one of the top ten best books he’s ever read which spurred me to buy the book and read it. Now I will share a warning about the book: it is a challenging read. It took me months to read it and days to read each chapter. However, every chapter ends with actions points called Your Path to Prosperity which are meant to challenge your growth. We all know that growing takes time. Our kids didn’t grow overnight, but over years. So take time to let the perspective, advice and challenges of this book grow a great fruit in your life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Barbiere

    Really good book about the nature of business, and how it's been intertwined with Judaism since the beginning of time. The author, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, is an excellent writer who frequently includes tales of the Bible to teach his readers about business. Often felt like he was talking to me in person because of the many anecdotes and stories used throughout each Commandment. There's also just as much research into modern business, with plenty of excellent references. Minus one star for grammatica Really good book about the nature of business, and how it's been intertwined with Judaism since the beginning of time. The author, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, is an excellent writer who frequently includes tales of the Bible to teach his readers about business. Often felt like he was talking to me in person because of the many anecdotes and stories used throughout each Commandment. There's also just as much research into modern business, with plenty of excellent references. Minus one star for grammatical issues; continual run-on sentences appeared often, and these detracted slightly from the inspiring content of this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ocean .

    I enjoyed this book. Many of the concepts shared are good, common sense, back-to-basics, solid, ethical, moral ways to live your life and conduct business, which I agree with. I'm not Jewish but found the explanations and references to how the Jewish religion teaches about business and the handling of money to be interesting. If you're looking to lay the foundation or validate core principles regarding money such as, do good work, care about others, be fair, honest and kind in your dealings in b I enjoyed this book. Many of the concepts shared are good, common sense, back-to-basics, solid, ethical, moral ways to live your life and conduct business, which I agree with. I'm not Jewish but found the explanations and references to how the Jewish religion teaches about business and the handling of money to be interesting. If you're looking to lay the foundation or validate core principles regarding money such as, do good work, care about others, be fair, honest and kind in your dealings in business and finance, this is a good book for you.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Anger

    This book is PACKED with truths that will affect every area of your life, not just in regard to making money, though that is the overarching theme. I would definitely set aside to listen to this audio book again. To be fair, it took me two tries to start the book because the first hour or two didn't grab me, but once I got further into the book, I couldn't stop reading! Almost daily I would mention to a coworker, "This reminds me of something I read in Thou Shall Prosper...." This book made me r This book is PACKED with truths that will affect every area of your life, not just in regard to making money, though that is the overarching theme. I would definitely set aside to listen to this audio book again. To be fair, it took me two tries to start the book because the first hour or two didn't grab me, but once I got further into the book, I couldn't stop reading! Almost daily I would mention to a coworker, "This reminds me of something I read in Thou Shall Prosper...." This book made me really think and view the business world around me with new eyes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Soares

    It's a book with great concepts that one shall not forget. So, why the 3 stars review? It was a book where I did not learn anything new. There is no problem with that too. Repetition is the mother of skill. However, from the great reviews I have read, and the recommendations, I guess I set some expectations for the book and it didn't deliver in that aspect. But that comes from someone who has read MANY books on the topic, that's why. In the end, it's not about reading more, it's about practicing wh It's a book with great concepts that one shall not forget. So, why the 3 stars review? It was a book where I did not learn anything new. There is no problem with that too. Repetition is the mother of skill. However, from the great reviews I have read, and the recommendations, I guess I set some expectations for the book and it didn't deliver in that aspect. But that comes from someone who has read MANY books on the topic, that's why. In the end, it's not about reading more, it's about practicing what is shared in those books. Now... let's do that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    Interesting. I found myself not agreeing with all points but Rabbi Lapin has some great points that made me think. One is that making money (profit) can be a spiritual exercise. It reminded me of the parable of the talents that Jesus told in Matthew 25, in which he commended the two stewards who doubled the talents given to them and the one who made the most profit was given the talents of the one who didn't even invest them. So, profit is not evil, which I think is a subtle belief we can someti Interesting. I found myself not agreeing with all points but Rabbi Lapin has some great points that made me think. One is that making money (profit) can be a spiritual exercise. It reminded me of the parable of the talents that Jesus told in Matthew 25, in which he commended the two stewards who doubled the talents given to them and the one who made the most profit was given the talents of the one who didn't even invest them. So, profit is not evil, which I think is a subtle belief we can sometimes have.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Clifford Fajardo

    I'm so happy I discovered this book (through a friends recommendation) early in my entrepreneurial journey. When I started reading this book I had left my traditional W2 job about 2 months prior, and although I felt I was doing fine, I feel like I needed adopt and expose myself to the topics concerning the entrepreneurial and business mindset. For me this really shattered all self-doubt and beliefs about business that I had and taught me so several new principles and mental models that I'm going I'm so happy I discovered this book (through a friends recommendation) early in my entrepreneurial journey. When I started reading this book I had left my traditional W2 job about 2 months prior, and although I felt I was doing fine, I feel like I needed adopt and expose myself to the topics concerning the entrepreneurial and business mindset. For me this really shattered all self-doubt and beliefs about business that I had and taught me so several new principles and mental models that I'm going to continue applying. Easily now one of my top 3 books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Turns out that the best way to make money is not to focus on the money you want, but on the work you can do and want to do to provide value to others. This is the lesson from ancient Jewish wisdom and it has been a guiding principle for me in my own career as a social worker. It is also true that serving others and being generous with one's money are keys to happiness, not how much wealth we accumulate or what we buy with it. I couldn't agree more! This is a very helpful book and I enjoyed liste Turns out that the best way to make money is not to focus on the money you want, but on the work you can do and want to do to provide value to others. This is the lesson from ancient Jewish wisdom and it has been a guiding principle for me in my own career as a social worker. It is also true that serving others and being generous with one's money are keys to happiness, not how much wealth we accumulate or what we buy with it. I couldn't agree more! This is a very helpful book and I enjoyed listening to it on audiobook. Like many modern liberals, I am ambivalent about money. But I think Lapin makes a good point that creating wealth is not a zero sum game, like eating 7 pieces of pie and leaving only 1 for everyone else. Money earned ethically and put to good use can benefit many others besides the person earning it and it is not "stolen" from the less fortunate. Lapin is a bit longwinded and I don't agree with everything he says. For example, he puts so much emphasis on the money we earn being the measure of our value to others, that he emphatically disapproves of retirement. I think there are other avenues for providing value to the community - volunteer work, creative expression and civic engagement, for example - that can contribute to meaningful retirement. I also found him to be excessively dismissive of environmentalism in defending the profit motive of business. But overall, there is a wealth (pun intended) of wisdom here, and if you want to explore your own relationship to making money, this is an informative and thought-provoking read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sheree Martin

    Better than OK, but not amazing. Too political, too Ayn Rand-ish. I believe that hard work is a necessary ingredient for success, but it's not sufficient. A whole lot more is also necessary. Without hard work, you fail. No question. That said, all the hard work in the world won't make you "prosper" in the lucre sense. You need great ideas, connections, and some grace, luck, or more along the way. Furthermore, if your family/cultural environment is not attuned to the value of work, education, self Better than OK, but not amazing. Too political, too Ayn Rand-ish. I believe that hard work is a necessary ingredient for success, but it's not sufficient. A whole lot more is also necessary. Without hard work, you fail. No question. That said, all the hard work in the world won't make you "prosper" in the lucre sense. You need great ideas, connections, and some grace, luck, or more along the way. Furthermore, if your family/cultural environment is not attuned to the value of work, education, self-discipline and self-denial, you have an uphill battle. Not making excuses for those who are poor. Bootstrap-pulling is definitely possible, but it's not as easy as some in a certain ideological group make it out to be. All of those caveats aside, if you work hard and are motivated to build connections and self-educate you can achieve success. This book can help you along the path to success (just disregard some of the polemics expressed).

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