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Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must Be Challenged is volume three in the NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY STUDIES IN BIBLE & THEOLOGY (NACSBT) series for pastors, advanced Bible students, and other deeply committed laypersons. Author Barry E. Horner writes to persuade readers concerning the divine validity of the Jew today (based on Romans 11:28), as well as the natio Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must Be Challenged is volume three in the NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY STUDIES IN BIBLE & THEOLOGY (NACSBT) series for pastors, advanced Bible students, and other deeply committed laypersons. Author Barry E. Horner writes to persuade readers concerning the divine validity of the Jew today (based on Romans 11:28), as well as the nation of Israel and the land of Palestine, in the midst of this much debated issue within Christendom at various levels. He examines the Bible’s consistent pro-Judaic direction, namely a Judeo-centric eschatology that is a unifying feature throughout Scripture. Not sensationalist like many other writings on this constantly debated topic, Future Israel is instead notably exegetical and theological in its argumentation. Users will find this an excellent extension of the long-respected NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY.    


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Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must Be Challenged is volume three in the NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY STUDIES IN BIBLE & THEOLOGY (NACSBT) series for pastors, advanced Bible students, and other deeply committed laypersons. Author Barry E. Horner writes to persuade readers concerning the divine validity of the Jew today (based on Romans 11:28), as well as the natio Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must Be Challenged is volume three in the NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY STUDIES IN BIBLE & THEOLOGY (NACSBT) series for pastors, advanced Bible students, and other deeply committed laypersons. Author Barry E. Horner writes to persuade readers concerning the divine validity of the Jew today (based on Romans 11:28), as well as the nation of Israel and the land of Palestine, in the midst of this much debated issue within Christendom at various levels. He examines the Bible’s consistent pro-Judaic direction, namely a Judeo-centric eschatology that is a unifying feature throughout Scripture. Not sensationalist like many other writings on this constantly debated topic, Future Israel is instead notably exegetical and theological in its argumentation. Users will find this an excellent extension of the long-respected NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY.    

30 review for Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must Be Challenged

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donald Stevenson

    Required reading!! Not an easy read, long with many quotes and quite repetitive. Dealing with a very needed topic in establishing how anti-semitism has actually been encouraged and supported through wrong doctrine. I highly commend this book despite the challenges of its style, and for the church worldwide to have the same heart for the Jewish people that is evident in the Apostle Paul! There is needed correction in this book - the historical research is very helpful in understanding the challen Required reading!! Not an easy read, long with many quotes and quite repetitive. Dealing with a very needed topic in establishing how anti-semitism has actually been encouraged and supported through wrong doctrine. I highly commend this book despite the challenges of its style, and for the church worldwide to have the same heart for the Jewish people that is evident in the Apostle Paul! There is needed correction in this book - the historical research is very helpful in understanding the challenges that Jews have faced over the last 1900 years.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    This topic (and book) was brought to me by an unbelieving Jewish man who started studying the New Testament (NT) because he has observed anti-Semitism historically in Christianity and wanted to see for himself if the source was the NT, or an improper interpretation of the New Testament. So, up front, I want to challenge my friend that Jesus and the majority of the NT writers are Jewish, and their writings are not anti-Semitic. And Horner does great job showing that through appealing to OT and N This topic (and book) was brought to me by an unbelieving Jewish man who started studying the New Testament (NT) because he has observed anti-Semitism historically in Christianity and wanted to see for himself if the source was the NT, or an improper interpretation of the New Testament. So, up front, I want to challenge my friend that Jesus and the majority of the NT writers are Jewish, and their writings are not anti-Semitic. And Horner does great job showing that through appealing to OT and NT sources. Another reason this topic is of considerable interest to me is the number of my friends that are becoming more Reformed in areas beyond Soteriology to a Reformed Eschatology and Ecclesiology. In Future Israel Horner traces a correlation between anti-Semitism in history and a Reformed Ecclesiology and Eschatology. His premise is that replacement theology (the idea that the Church has replaced Israel as the people of God) can and has led to terrible anti-Semitic views/actions in the past. He does not conclude (I don't think) that one causes the other but I think this book fires a real and necessary warning signal to today's resurgence in Reformed Eschatology/Ecclesiology. It is significant that Horner is reformed in his education, and other areas of theology. His subject of expertise is Puritan literature (Bunyan in particular). Also, John MacArthur wrote a positive review of the book and recommends Future Israel as "required reading for every pastor, seminarian, and student of Bible prophecy." Beyond demonstrating a correlation between replacement theology and anti-Jewish thought, Horner develops the NT's claims of a continuing Jewish National/existence today and into God's plans yet future. Before I survey the chapters, I'll make a couple of general observations. First, although his documentation is sound and convincing, some of the language can be over-emotional, almost volatile. His link between quotes of replacement theologians concerning Israel and anti-Semitism is exaggerated in some places (see discussion on chapter two below). But one has led to the other in History so it is a warning that should not be ignored. As this is a subject that should bring great sorrow to us, I definitely understand the emotion. On the subject of readability: wow this book was difficult to get through, and I enjoyed the topic! There are lengthy quotes on nearly every page. It would have been great if Horner would have summarized half of them in a sentence quoting the individual. The book would have been 1/3 the length and much more enjoyable. That being said, Horner is not writing for popular reading so perhaps I just need to grow up. Below is a brief overview of the chapters: Chapter 1 - Israel and Christian Anti-Judaism in Contrast In this chapter Horner offers a contrast between Augustine/Calvin and Bonar/Spurgeon. From these men Horner contrasts two positions - the view that National Israel has no distinctive eschatological hope with the view that National Israel does have a distinctive national hope. Chapter 2 - Israel and Centuries of Christian Anti-Judaism Horner documents centuries of "anti-Judaism" in Christian thinking by surveying positions and quotes from Christians in 13 different sections of Christian history. In most of these sections there are examples of alarming anti-Jewish thought in Christian literature. Let me offer to my Jewish friends another apology for these positions that are antithetical to the Love Jesus has for all Jewish people and is also antithetical to the love of early believers like Paul who would gladly go to Hell if only Jewish people would come to believe in Jesus. But let me also offer a few notes of explanation - not excuses but explanation. 1. Many of these periods of history are dark (hence the term Dark Ages). In many of these seasons of church history true believers are in the extreme minority - especially in the realm of church leadership. Be careful not to quote as Christian someone who's heart and soul has not been transformed by the love of Christ. That being said there are quotes from men whom we regard as champions in other areas of doctrine whose' position on the Jewish nation is horrible. I would get up and walk out of the room were I to hear Ambrose say Jewish people are a "house of impiety, a receptacle of folly, which God himself has condemned"... or Chrysostom "I hate the Jews for they have the law and they insult it." So let me offer a couple other thoughts that are extremely important in this regard. I wish Horner would bring these out as well. 2. The age of the separation of church and state and religious freedom is a relatively new idea. We read our culture back into many of these previous times. The view that Islam has towards the nations it conquers is the only view of past history. "Covert or die." Even at the founding of the American states, you would have to be of a certain faith or denomination in order to be accepted in that state. There were exceptions, but unbelief was a State offence - a crime. I think that freedom of faith is a wonderful thing! But we have to acknowledge that this is not the norm in most cultures in history. So don't read today's freedom of religion back into a past context. Jewish people were spoken against and persecuted not because they were Jewish per se, but because they were unbelieving. If I were alive back then and I believed in a marshmallow god who showered starbursts and rainbow wings on everyone who offered praise and homage to her I would be persecuted with all the hatred and vitriol of those who persecuted Muslims and Jewish unbelievers. Of course this was wrong back then, just as it is today. True Christianity dies for it's belief's suffering gladly for the cause of Christ. This is the testimony of the first two hundred years of Christianity. One more thought to consider. 3. Many Christians persecuted and spoke against others who were Christians that did not hold to their particular denominational belief. The same anti-Jewish language that Horner cites could be cited as spoken from "good Christians" to other "good Christians." This was an age where spiritual matters were much more weighty than material matters. If someone taught in error they were called to the carpet (or sadly, execution). Souls were at stake - eternal existence hung in the balance and there was no room for mincing words or taking matters lightly. There is some good we can learn from this in our culture. Today we are so slow to call out false teachers that they spread much more quickly. Of course, they took this to a fault (especially considering the first point above). In fact, in the reformation times I would be persecuted because of my view of baptism. Even though I call myself a Christian I am not the type of Christian that the State is so I would be persecuted till I got in line. And if I didn't change or leave I would be killed! One quick illustration of this. Luther and Zwingli met with several other reformers to see if they could iron out their differences and combine forces to help link the Reformation movement in Switzerland (Zwingli) with Germany (Luther). They found a consensus on fourteen points. But on one point (their position on the Lord's Table) they could not come to a consensus. What was Luther's response? Agree to disagree? No - he said they were all going to Hell (his retort was not in the modern nomenclature - he was serious) and stormed out of the meetings. Do I excuse their actions? No. But it helps me see the culture in which some of these quotes against Jewish people fall. They are still horrible - but as you put them among similar quotes from Christians to Christians they are more understandable. They are not excusable but understandable... I believe Luther (and other reformers) would have said the same things about their own wives had they known they were guilty of the same unbelief. Sad but true. Chapter 3/4 - Israel and Contemporary Examples of Christian Anti-Judaism in the US/UK The next two chapters are given to expose Anti-Judaism in current thought (US/UK). If you have read my three reasons for understanding Anti-Judaism quotes in Church History past, you know that those reasons go out the window in current theology. Horner links the Anti-Jewish thought today with a reformed eschatology/ecclesiology. Horner quotes from Albertus Pieters (Western Theological Seminary in MI), Loraine Boettner (Princeton), Gary Burge (Wheaton), O Palmer Robertson (African Bible College, Knox). He spends a big chunk of the chapter refuting an essay by Robertson and going line by line through an "Open Letter to Evangelicals and Other Interested Parties: The People of God, the Land of Israel, and the Impartiality of the Gospel. Although the quotes in these two chapters are more subtle than the ones from the previous (anti-Judaism in History). Horner examines how replacement theology lends itself to being Anti-Jewish - especially with regard to the current Israeli/Palestinian debate. The Knox letter was good reading through a big chunk but sickening in how it spoke of Israel and Palestine almost as on equal footing with regard to the Land. If you disagree, read chapter 5. The Anti-Jewish described in these chapters is more in tone than content and has more to do with the modern state of Israel. If the promises are fulfilled in the church then the Christian's position on the Modern Jewish state completely changes. Horner documents this change very clearly. Chapter 5 - Israel and Christian Encounter with Zionism This is a great chapter to get an overview of the history of the Israel state - a very helpful survey. Chapter 6 - Israel and Christian Anti-Judaic Hermeneutics in History The chapter surveys replacement theology throughout the ages of the church. Horner also quotes many disagreed with the replacement theology of the day. The largest portion of the chapter deals with eschatology (doctrine of end times) and especially Fairbairn, Bavinck and Vos. Chapter 7 - Israel and Christian Anti-Judaic Hermeneutics Today Horner shows how often in Reformed circles, the OT is miss-read through the lenses of the NT, reinterpreting clear OT passages in light of NT theology. "An anti-Judaic eschatology is most often grounded on a NT re-interpretation of the OT. By this means the 'Christianizing' of the OT results in it being evacuated of its distinctive Jewish roots and substance" (pg. 186). Although we see the OT in light of the NT and it gives greater OT understanding, the greater understanding should not change the essence of the language. Often the normal language of the OT text points to Jesus - but where it does not we don't stretch to fit it in. We shouldn't see the church in the honey of the carcass of the lion that Sampson enjoyed. Nor do we reinterpret clear promises to Israel to belong solely to the church. Especially helpful in this chapter is a section that walks through three popular passages which are used to demonstrate a new New-Covenant Hermeneutic (Hosea 1:1/Matthew 2:15; Amos 9:11-12/Acts 15:16-18; Zech 12:10-14/John 19:37, Rev 1:7). Chapter 8 - Israel and the Harmony of Spiritual Materiality Often pre-millennialism is criticized for being too physical, too earth-centered. Here Horner gives scriptural support for a continuing understanding of the physical in our spiritual future. Also he highlights a resurgence of this concept in recent Post-millennial writers. In the pre-millennial system, "materiality is not ultimately to be transcended, but rather transformed" (pg. 214). Chapter 9 - Israel and the Inheritance of the Land through Abraham For Horner this is the crux of the issue. If God's promises are based on unconditional promises to Abraham then we cannot assume that the NT church supersedes these promises thus abrogating them for Abraham's children. After all, we would not think that as possible to the promises of blessing to "all the nations of the earth." He shows how God's land-possession promises and nation promises to Israel are not just based on the Mosaic covenant and therefore conditioned upon obedience, but are based on the unconditional, eternal Abrahamic Covenant. He quotes Bavnick, Cranfield, Lloyd Jones, and Waltke against this position, especially in their understanding of Romans 11. However, he walks through Luke 21:2-24, John 1:11, Romans 9:26, Romans 11:1, 26, 29, Galatians 3:16, 21 in support. Chapter 10 - Israel and a Romans 11 Synthesis This is a valuable chapter in the book as Horner goes step by step through Romans 11 developing the Biblical understanding of Israel in NT eyes. Also he explains some of the NT passages used most often by Replacement Theologians to prove that Israel is replaced by the church (Galatians 6:16; Ephesians 2:11-22; Hebrews 8:7-13; 10:15-18; Jeremiah 31:40 1 Peter 2:9-10). Especially significant is Romans 11:28, "from the standpoint of God's choice they are beloved for the sake of the fathers." Chapter 12 - Israel in Need of the Prodigal Gentile's Love Horner enjoins Gentiles to rise up in evangelizing and bringing Jewish people to a saving understanding of Messiah, Jesus. If you interpret the parable of the prodigal son as the Jewish older brother looking down on the salvation of the Gentile younger brother who came to the Father fresh with the smell of swine spit. How degrading! Then we now see the relationship completely switched. Horner applies this same story to those who now look down on evangelistic outreach to Jewish people. "Certainly the Jews of Jesus' time were contemptuous in their regard for the Gentiles. But how strange it is that today so many Gentile Christians, and hardly any Jewish Christians, are of the opinion that now it is the Jews that are beyond redemption and forever cast aside by the Father in heaven. On the part of some Gentile Christian, their attitude toward ethnic Jews and national Israel is literally disgraceful" (pg. 312). I'll end with Horner's conclusion as well as a beautiful poem. "As was stated in the introduction of this volume, in the field of eschatology there are matters of lesser significance that concern the antichrist, the great tribulation, the rapture, etc. But the issue of the place of Israel in the Bible, and especially in relation to the NT, is a transcendently important one. With regard to this vital matter of national Israel's present existence or nonexistence according to divine covenant, history plainly leads us to an unavoidable conclusion: profound ethical and practical consequences are involved here - even issues of life and death. It is for this reason, among other lesser matters, that I have felt compelled not only to make such a vital distinction in the field of what is really important in eschatology, but also to vigorously defend that doctrine which tends to rectify such an appalling anti-Judaic heritage" (pg 330). Wake, harp of Zion, wake again, Upon thine ancient hill, On Jordan's long deserted plain, By Kedron's lowly rill. The hymn shall yet in Zion swell That sounds Messiah's praise, And Thy loved name, Immanuel! As once in ancient days. For Israel yet shall own her King, For her salvation waits, And hill and dale shall sweetly sing With praise in all her gates. Hasten, O Lord, these promised days, When Israel shall rejoice; And Jew and Gentile join in praise, With one united voice. James Edmeston, 1846

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yibbie

    This book is a careful refutation of amillennialist anti-Judaic doctrine. This idea can be called Replacement Theology, Supersessionism, Fulfillment Theology, Transference Theology, or Absortionism. They all teach that because national Israel rejected Christ, God cast them aside and replaced them with the church. Because of that, the Jews will forever be subject to God’s judgment, and never again have a distinct part to play in God’s plan. They believe that every promise of land, statehood, eth This book is a careful refutation of amillennialist anti-Judaic doctrine. This idea can be called Replacement Theology, Supersessionism, Fulfillment Theology, Transference Theology, or Absortionism. They all teach that because national Israel rejected Christ, God cast them aside and replaced them with the church. Because of that, the Jews will forever be subject to God’s judgment, and never again have a distinct part to play in God’s plan. They believe that every promise of land, statehood, ethnic identity and eternal blessing has been either nullified or transferred to the church. Amillennialists will gladly acknowledge that individual Jews can be saved, but that is always qualified with the condition that they become absorbed into the Gentile church, absolutely renouncing the specific blessings God promised them as a unique ethnic people. Summary Horner takes a slightly different angle to demonstrate to us why he believes amillennialism is false. He asks us to consider the fruits of this doctrine. First, he shows us its poisonous fruit by chronicling centuries of Jewish persecution and death condoned and instigated by Christian leaders following Augustine’s theological leading. Then he delves into the teachings of current leaders and the anti-Semitic fruit that is growing from it again. Specifically, he wants us to understand how this theology has prejudiced sections of Christianity against the modern nation of Israel and made them overly accommodating to Israel’s Muslim neighbors. Second, he asks us to compare that theology with Paul’s heart for the Jewish nation in Romans 9 – 11. He helps us understand Paul the Jewish Rabbi who saw the world through the eyes of a saved Jew. As a Jew with a clear understanding of the Old Testament, Paul clearly recognized the blessings God unconditionally gave the nation of Israel. He recognizes that God has a unique plan for Israel in the future. He even warns us, the redeemed Gentiles, to be very careful about developing an attitude of pride against the ‘broken off branches’, the unsaved Jews. Horner shows us how Paul never gave up on his people even while focusing on grafting in Gentiles. So how does our theology compare to Paul’s? Does it make us long for Israel’s national repentance? Does it allow us to acknowledge God’s promises and blessings to them? Or does it force us to allegorize and redefine Scriptural terms? Does it enable us to witness to a Jew while acknowledging his special place in God’s plan? Description, Horner is extremely gracious in his style but unyielding in his convictions. This book is very thorough. It includes numerous quotes from dozens of authors on both sides of the issue. He acknowledges with gratitude the contributions amillennialist authors have made to our understanding of Biblical doctrine. However, he does not believe that it is an issue that can be compromised on, and therefore he clearly shows us where he thinks they have errored in their Biblical interpretation. He is very thorough. He explains their positions through their own words. That means that there are very long sections of quotes. It is formatted in such a way that it is easy to identify Horner’s commentary from the quoted material. The vocabulary is quite scholarly, but understandable to the layman as well. It is a book that requires careful biblical study. There are many, many biblical references that should be looked up for a full understanding of the arguments on all sides. Recommendation, I would recommend this book to everyone I know. The Gentiles need to be reminded about our place as the branches grafted into the vine. We need to see our culpability in the Church’s historic and current anti-Semitism. Then we need to see the Biblical response to it. As with all truth, if we accept it, it will change the way we see the world and encourage our hearts in the Lord. It is the author’s prayer that it will lead us to a greater missionary outreach to the Jews. The Jews have suffered so much from the fruit of the Church’s false teachings, but have such a glorious future according to the Bible. Perhaps, through this book, they will see that Jesus isn’t the enemy of the Jews, and will be provoked to jealousy through our love. I do not agree with all of his beliefs about Calvinism, but I do agree with and appreciate his stand for national Israel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    This is the third in the B&H NAC Studies series. Horner makes the case, from a Reformed perspective, that the Augustinian heritage in Reformed Theology that bequeathed Replacement theology to the church has led to disastrous results in the way Jewish people are treated. The book makes its point, all the more so because Horner is a Reformed theologian. The book is also too long - poorly edited. His exegesis is good; it just needed to be shorter. This is the third in the B&H NAC Studies series. Horner makes the case, from a Reformed perspective, that the Augustinian heritage in Reformed Theology that bequeathed Replacement theology to the church has led to disastrous results in the way Jewish people are treated. The book makes its point, all the more so because Horner is a Reformed theologian. The book is also too long - poorly edited. His exegesis is good; it just needed to be shorter.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brent McCulley

    Highly polemical and vitriolic at times. Two page block quotes, and repetitive assertions that any Augustinian hermeneutic is anti-semetic. Not worth the read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christopher S.

    In Genesis 12 God made a unilateral covenant with Abraham. That covenant was specific to Israel and contained the promise of land, descendants, and a future inheritance. But for many in the Reformed tradition, these promises to Abraham and his descendants have now been subsumed by the Church. Instead of reading the prophecies regarding the future of Israel literally, these prophesies are spiritualized. Instead of taking Paul at his word in Romans 11:26 that “all Israel will be saved” some argue In Genesis 12 God made a unilateral covenant with Abraham. That covenant was specific to Israel and contained the promise of land, descendants, and a future inheritance. But for many in the Reformed tradition, these promises to Abraham and his descendants have now been subsumed by the Church. Instead of reading the prophecies regarding the future of Israel literally, these prophesies are spiritualized. Instead of taking Paul at his word in Romans 11:26 that “all Israel will be saved” some argue that Israel refers only to a remnant and cannot otherwise be taken literally. In “Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must be Challenged” Barry E. Horner argues persuasively that God does have a plan for Israel’s future in exact fulfillment of the Abrahamic Covenant. This is not a purely academic question as Horner amply demonstrates. In fact, this idea of Replacement Theology has resulted in an anti Semitic view to pervade a segment of the Church. Such is the unfortunate outgrowth of a theology that teaches God is finished with the nation of Israel. Such a theology, Horner argues, also results in a diminished gospel witness to the Jews. On all counts I believe Horner is correct and perceptively so. Horner’s case is compelling because he goes to great lengths to quote those throughout history who have argued in favor of supercessionism (ie Replacement Theology. He argues point by point why they are wrong and why it matters. This book is well documented, well reasoned and thoroughly Biblical. The Apostle Paul (ala Romans 11 would be approvingly proud). This is an important book for the serious Bible student who is interested in eschatology (especially premillennialism) and wants to understand how the prophesies of the Old Testament prophesies when read literally produce an understandable picture of God’s plan for both Jews and Gentiles in the end of the age and beyond. Happy reading!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Boling

    There are some segments of Christianity that espouse the belief that God is done with the Jewish people. This idea is rooted in Replacement Theology, namely the affirmation that the Church has completely replaced Israel in salvation history and therefore God no longer has any plans or use for the people of Israel. Essentially, this system promotes that Israel has been set aside, no longer to be of any consequence. Such a notion is biblically unfounded. Barry Horner, in his book Future Israel: Wh There are some segments of Christianity that espouse the belief that God is done with the Jewish people. This idea is rooted in Replacement Theology, namely the affirmation that the Church has completely replaced Israel in salvation history and therefore God no longer has any plans or use for the people of Israel. Essentially, this system promotes that Israel has been set aside, no longer to be of any consequence. Such a notion is biblically unfounded. Barry Horner, in his book Future Israel: Why Christian Anti-Judaism Must be Challenged presents a biblically sound approach to the reality that God is not done with His people and why such an idea must be rooted out from within the body of Christ. Horner begins by looking at a variety of theological thought on this topic to include the writings of Augustine, John Calvin, Horatius Bonar, and C. H. Spurgeon, noting the attitudes taken by these prominent theologians towards the Jewish people and their understanding of whether or not God still has a plan for His people. Horner also explores the rather unsavory history of anti-Judaism and supercessationism by many throughout church history. He rightly notes “An astonishing ignorance abides today concerning the legacy of Christian anti-Judaism, and works of church history frequently fail to discuss it.” Thankfully, Horner exposes this ugly side of things and rightly so, providing the reader with valuable insight into how anti-Judaism fervor reared its ugly head far too often. Such fervor continues even today in various forms. Horner not only explores past anti-Judaism but he also demonstrates how this attitude has shaped the theology of many current and noted authors and theologians in the United States and throughout the world. I will be honest in saying some of the names he mentioned were quite surprising. Mentioning these individuals whether past or present is not intended as a personal attack. Conversely, Horner is merely trying to point out that anti-Judaism is a pernicious and often sneaky wrong doctrine that can present itself in the writings of even the most astute theologian. Thus, it must be guarded against. I found Horner’s discussion of the alignment of certain authors and theologians with anti-Israelite camps to be both interesting and frightening. Love for their land has been at the core of the Jewish people’s very being and Horner traces different points in history when the Jewish people have been scattered from their homeland and when they have returned. Some within the Church reject Zionism while others are, as noted by Horner, “torn in two directions, even as did Paul when he described the unbelieving nation of Israel in his day as God’s beloved enemy.” While many Jewish people continue to reject Jesus as the promised Messiah, , Horner rightly comments, “God retains a deep covenantal interest in His people of the flesh in the same manner that he indicated this loyal love toward Israel as an adulterous people by means of the prophet Hosea.” Of course the fight over the land of Israel continues to be front and center. While it is quite clear that the Palestinians and the Arab countries surrounding Israel have no love for her as a nation, it is quite shocking to see the number of well respected Christian theologians who reject the very idea that the people of Israel returning to the land as promised by God long ago? One will be surprised to see the well known theologians who affirm such an idea. Horner does a great job of explaining this promise of the land found in both the Old and New Testaments. He suggest the future reality will be a “future, holy, consummate messianic kingdom subsequent to the return of the Lord Jesus Christ and whose nature may be designate as spiritual materiality.” Furthermore, “In this setting of heaven come to earth, Israel and the Jewish people will be fulfilled, not superseded, and the Gentile nations will happily submit to this divine order as engrafted wild olive branches.” While such an approach is certainly opposed to the popular Dispensationalism theory promoted by many today, Horner’s statement is more in line with biblical truth and a more cogent approach to matters of eschatology. Romans 11 is an often wildly debated chapter with many using it as a springboard by which to either affirm the Church replacing Israel or the opposite approach, namely the reality that Gentiles are grafted into the olive branch. As such, Horner’s chapter that addresses this often thorny issue is in my opinion the best aspect of this book. He begins his examination of Romans 11 by noting “a correct interpretation of the new covenant passages requires a hermeneutic that gives serious consideration to the Jewish presuppositions that are inherent in them.” To do otherwise involves the aberrant theories of replacement, supercessionist, or fulfillment theologies. The exegesis conducted by Horner is quite excellent and very in-depth. I highly recommend this book for all believers. The subject matter is extremely important and Horner does a marvelous job of digging into past and present thought and how it aligns with Scripture. While this book will likely not resolve all of the raging debate within Christianity and theological thought, the reader will certainly have a much better understanding of the fact that God still has a plan for the Jewish people. While many of them continue to reject Jesus and are in need of the saving message of the Gospel, this does not mean the Church has superseded them nor does it mean God has washed His hands of the people He made a covenant with. Horner’s work has certainly brought many issues to light for me and I will definitely return to it in the future for further study on this topic as it is chock full of valuable information. I received this book for free from B&H Academic for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Blake

    An exceptional book. Truly a book that should be read by every pastor, every seminarian, every young person thinking that full time ministry is in their future, and frankly, any Christian who wants to understand the future of Israel. The book shows the history of the debate about Israel's future, demonstrates the Hermeneutical problem that lead to Luther's anti-Jew perspective, and the hangover effects of that Hermeneutic down to our present time. Horner's book solidified in my mind the fact tha An exceptional book. Truly a book that should be read by every pastor, every seminarian, every young person thinking that full time ministry is in their future, and frankly, any Christian who wants to understand the future of Israel. The book shows the history of the debate about Israel's future, demonstrates the Hermeneutical problem that lead to Luther's anti-Jew perspective, and the hangover effects of that Hermeneutic down to our present time. Horner's book solidified in my mind the fact that we Gentiles read the Biblical more from a Gentile perspective than the Jewish perspective, and therein is one of the problems. It solidified in my mind what I believe is a biblical statement about God's work in the future with His nation, Israel. Horner not only unpacks the history of the Anti-Jew mindset (which is strongly rooted in Augustinian beliefs) but also gives indepth consideration to key passages that relate to the Abrahamic Covenant, the Davidic Covenant, the New Covenant, etc. Horner also highlights JC Ryle's perspective, as well as Bonar's, Edwards, and Spurgeon. It was an academic read, but one that I believe is really tremendous.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian Chilton

    Horner does an excellent job defending his thesis in that Israel still matters in biblical eschatology. Horner proves his point in exquisite fashion. However, his book makes for a very difficult read. Due to his difficult writing style, redundancy in particular issues, and enormous amount of quotations (which guessing would account for at least 1/4 of the book), this reader scores the book a 3 of 5 stars. If one were to rate the book on Horner's effectiveness in presenting his point alone, he bo Horner does an excellent job defending his thesis in that Israel still matters in biblical eschatology. Horner proves his point in exquisite fashion. However, his book makes for a very difficult read. Due to his difficult writing style, redundancy in particular issues, and enormous amount of quotations (which guessing would account for at least 1/4 of the book), this reader scores the book a 3 of 5 stars. If one were to rate the book on Horner's effectiveness in presenting his point alone, he book would score a perfect 5.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Short

    This is an excellent book and a serious treatment of this subject. The book is mostly a history of supercessionist, or replacement, theology and its anti-Judaism fruit. This book is carefully researched and footnoted. The citations alone make it worth the study. Horner also treats many key passages and provides historic citations on the same. I highly recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Ruvalcaba

    Very thorough and Persuasive The book was very well organized with a wealth of information written in an easily digestible manner. I highly recommend this book as a great overview of the history of Church’s dealings with the Jews.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rick Hogaboam

    Necessary reading on Israel's role in redemptive history I'm preaching through Romans and decided to do some reading from more contemporary sources on the issue of Israel, especially relevant in Romans 9-11 but to the whole book as a whole. This volume was helpful in challenging some of my thinking and also advancing a view with more complexity than I had previously granted. The subtitle is unfortunate, because Anti-Judaism is often equated with anti-Semitic -- and I wouldn't use this phrase to d Necessary reading on Israel's role in redemptive history I'm preaching through Romans and decided to do some reading from more contemporary sources on the issue of Israel, especially relevant in Romans 9-11 but to the whole book as a whole. This volume was helpful in challenging some of my thinking and also advancing a view with more complexity than I had previously granted. The subtitle is unfortunate, because Anti-Judaism is often equated with anti-Semitic -- and I wouldn't use this phrase to describe those who happen to differ with Horner's views on the role of Israel in the future. This is to be distinguished from those who are quite frankly animated in great opposition to Israel and the Jewish people. And, sadly, some Christians throughout history are guilty of exactly that. Horner, while rightly attributing significance to Augustine's impact on hermeneutics and the subsequent majority position of the church regarding Israel, was overly redundant in summarizing those in opposition to his view as adopting an Augustinian position. It got old rather quickly. I realize it was an easy identifier and that he did acknowledge nuance and diversity of opinion concerning Israel, but it was overused. It was also used in a conflated sense of non-biblical, in my opinion. Augustine and the Bible were mutually exclusive, or so it seemed. I realize this was a polemical volume, but I would've preferred Horner to find another way to identity those in the opposition of his views. While Horner overstates the liabilities of holding a contrary view, his impassioned plea is ultimately rooted in his conviction that the very character of God is at stake in how we handle the promises of God made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The other side feels the same way. That's why this issue will always be contentious and impassioned. This volume is a worthy contribution in this discussion, which I consider an intramural debate within Christendom. And let's definite evangelize the Jewish people and all of the nations. There's no need for our evangelism to be mutually exclusive.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Connor Longaphie

    This is not academic. This is at best a book about Barry E. Horner's childish complaints of Amilennial quotes and at worst him complaining about the unfortunate history of the Jews and their shortcomings. He hardly addresses any theological content aside from Romans 11 but mostly relies upon guilt and social justice to press the point that Christians should be Zionists. In reality whether or not the Jews have had an unfortunate history, the debate between dispensationalists and covenantalists re This is not academic. This is at best a book about Barry E. Horner's childish complaints of Amilennial quotes and at worst him complaining about the unfortunate history of the Jews and their shortcomings. He hardly addresses any theological content aside from Romans 11 but mostly relies upon guilt and social justice to press the point that Christians should be Zionists. In reality whether or not the Jews have had an unfortunate history, the debate between dispensationalists and covenantalists remains unchanged.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    As a non-Jew from the nations ... this book helped me see that some contemporary theologians who renounce replacement theology are agreeing with the ongoing nationality of Jews as well as the territorial (land) component to Israel. The Protestant reformation seemed to provide ground for the Puritans and others to bring back to prominence the legitimacy of their nationality. Then 20th century Zionism brought back the subject of the Promised Land being their home/land ... still. The Messianic Jewis As a non-Jew from the nations ... this book helped me see that some contemporary theologians who renounce replacement theology are agreeing with the ongoing nationality of Jews as well as the territorial (land) component to Israel. The Protestant reformation seemed to provide ground for the Puritans and others to bring back to prominence the legitimacy of their nationality. Then 20th century Zionism brought back the subject of the Promised Land being their home/land ... still. The Messianic Jewish movement is pushing even further this topic of renouncing replacement theology - addressing other "norms" from the Old Testament through further research, such as 1) covenant being the venue by which God connects with man, thus being the anchor of all of Scripture, leading to Jesus' personification of the new covenant, 2) Israel's ongoing role as the firstborn son and priestly nation, 3) the applicable Laws given there is currently no Temple or theocracy in our generation, 4) in some areas of the movement the expanded issue of territory per angels/principalities over cities/countries is being addressed, and 5) which other beliefs/teachings should replace the existing replacement theology beliefs/teachings. These first 2 points of nationality and land, combined with the next 5 points, begin to provide a framework for people seeking to separate themselves from the false teaching of replacement theology. While there is a simple definition of replacement theology whereby the Church replaces Israel, there are many manifestations of such a false teaching. These 7 points begin to deal with these manifestations. An eighth would be the Hebrew language - restoring its understanding and usage. While the Catholic Church formally renounced replacement theology per Vatican II, the practical application still needs a lot of work. The Protestant groups who have renounced replacement theology and declared themselves "pro-Israel" also need to begin addressing these 7 points. The faithful remnant of Israel (the Messianic Jews) are not dots on end-times charts to help us non-Jews make sense of the book of Revelation. They are people. The suggested pattern towards a healthy expression for non-Jews has been to connect with Messianic Jews on this journey, as opposed to leaving out the Messianic Jews.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    It’s one thing to be passionate (as is clearly the case here) and quite another to be belligerent. Horner has every right to remain unapologetic in his convictions, but neglects tact and persuasion. As such, it was uninviting and unconvincing. Not only that, but I'm afraid it will illicit the same response from people who are interested in learning more: a desire to stay far away from the bitter ramblings and mud-slinging of end time studies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Horner presents a solid, biblical case for the defense of Israel as God's chosen people in the past, present, and future. My one critique is his insinuation that those who hold to supercessionist theology are intrinsically anti-Semitic, which I do not believe to be true. Otherwise, an excellent book on Christian support of the Jewish people and Israel.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sean McGowan

    Pretty Good.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Josue Manriquez

    This is not an easy book to read. I question whether or not it could have been shorter. Nevertheless, the author presents his case well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Must read. Excellent book refuting the teaching that God is through with Israel. Written from the perspective of someone in the Reformed camp.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    A must read for anyone serious about studying the subject of Israel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim Mallon

    Four stars for the quality of the research and content. While it was worthwhile and compelling it was a tedious read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason Bailey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nehemiah Ryan

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Addiss

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Ellingson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kyle C. Dunham

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lowell McDonald

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tim Chaffey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

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