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What is the “Christian life” all about? Studying the Bible, attending church, cultivating a prayer life, witnessing to others—those are all good. But is that really what Jesus has in mind? The answer, says Scot McKnight in One.Life, lies in Jesus’ words, “Follow me.” What does it look like to follow Jesus, and how will doing so change the way we live our life—our love.life What is the “Christian life” all about? Studying the Bible, attending church, cultivating a prayer life, witnessing to others—those are all good. But is that really what Jesus has in mind? The answer, says Scot McKnight in One.Life, lies in Jesus’ words, “Follow me.” What does it look like to follow Jesus, and how will doing so change the way we live our life—our love.life, our justice.life, our peace.life, our community.life, our sex.life—everything about our life. One.Life will open your eyes to the full, compelling immensity of what it means to be a Christian. “Jesus offers to us a kingdom dream that transforms us to the very core of our being,” says Scot McKnight. “His vision is so big we are called to give our entire life to it. His vision is so big it swallows up our dreams.” Discover exactly what Jesus meant when he announced the arrival of God’s kingdom. Equipping you with a new understanding of that kingdom’s radical nature, One.Life shares profound, challenging, and practical insights on how to demonstrate its reality in your life. In many ways, what The Cost of Discipleship by Bonhoeffer challenged Christians to do in earlier generations, One.Life will do for a new generation. One.Life will call you beyond the flatlands of religiosity toward a kingdom vision that will shape everything you do.


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What is the “Christian life” all about? Studying the Bible, attending church, cultivating a prayer life, witnessing to others—those are all good. But is that really what Jesus has in mind? The answer, says Scot McKnight in One.Life, lies in Jesus’ words, “Follow me.” What does it look like to follow Jesus, and how will doing so change the way we live our life—our love.life What is the “Christian life” all about? Studying the Bible, attending church, cultivating a prayer life, witnessing to others—those are all good. But is that really what Jesus has in mind? The answer, says Scot McKnight in One.Life, lies in Jesus’ words, “Follow me.” What does it look like to follow Jesus, and how will doing so change the way we live our life—our love.life, our justice.life, our peace.life, our community.life, our sex.life—everything about our life. One.Life will open your eyes to the full, compelling immensity of what it means to be a Christian. “Jesus offers to us a kingdom dream that transforms us to the very core of our being,” says Scot McKnight. “His vision is so big we are called to give our entire life to it. His vision is so big it swallows up our dreams.” Discover exactly what Jesus meant when he announced the arrival of God’s kingdom. Equipping you with a new understanding of that kingdom’s radical nature, One.Life shares profound, challenging, and practical insights on how to demonstrate its reality in your life. In many ways, what The Cost of Discipleship by Bonhoeffer challenged Christians to do in earlier generations, One.Life will do for a new generation. One.Life will call you beyond the flatlands of religiosity toward a kingdom vision that will shape everything you do.

30 review for One.Life: Jesus Calls, We Follow

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    An amazing book. This is one of those rare books that I rate a 5, and also am not hesitant, at all, to say that any follower of God in the way of Jesus...must read this book. McKnight is brilliant but so down to earth and easy to understand. There are many quotes I could give from this book, but I will share one. In a great section about the nature and purpose of the parables of Jesus, McKnight ends that chapter like this: "You begin thinking about very ordinary things, like fields and farmers an An amazing book. This is one of those rare books that I rate a 5, and also am not hesitant, at all, to say that any follower of God in the way of Jesus...must read this book. McKnight is brilliant but so down to earth and easy to understand. There are many quotes I could give from this book, but I will share one. In a great section about the nature and purpose of the parables of Jesus, McKnight ends that chapter like this: "You begin thinking about very ordinary things, like fields and farmers and workers and women baking bread and men picking wheat and wounded people, and suddenly you find yourself transported into a brand new world and a brand new way of thinking." Let me share one more: "Why did Jesus come? 'The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor' Then he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant and sat down. The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him. He began by saying to them, 'Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.' (Luke 4:16-21). Every five seconds a child dies of hunger. More than one million children are trafficked per year for sex. More than eight million children are forced into godless conditions to satisfy the perverse desire of perverse people. More than two million children have HIV. Do you think obliterating such things is why Jesus came? People choose to ignore this and go on with what can only be called 'the christian religion with barely any kingdom dream.' Why did Jesus come? You need to get this question answered right before you can even begin to make up your mind about Jesus."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim Beck

    it really is a simple book. Jesus calls. We follow. that is the message found within One.Life by Scot McKnight. We have one life. what will we do with it? How will we live it? what i appreciated about this book was how Scot took an honest look at questions... the questions of faith that lead to more questions... which lead to more and more questions. as the questions arise, McKnight paints a picture that describes kingdom, love, justice, peace, wisdom, the church, commitment, eternity, etc. God' it really is a simple book. Jesus calls. We follow. that is the message found within One.Life by Scot McKnight. We have one life. what will we do with it? How will we live it? what i appreciated about this book was how Scot took an honest look at questions... the questions of faith that lead to more questions... which lead to more and more questions. as the questions arise, McKnight paints a picture that describes kingdom, love, justice, peace, wisdom, the church, commitment, eternity, etc. God's plan is for our one.life to intersect with those things and McKnight wets the appetite for more. after reading, i want more... i feel compelled to share with others what it looks like to follow Christ... truly follow Christ.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    There are so many good quotes in this book. He writes about "Jesus' kingdom dream." I've always been a little confused about Jesus' concept of "the Kingdom." I am still not real clear on that but it is probably some mental block on my part.The book seems to be written for millennials although, of course, very helpful for any age person. One of the first key ideas is simply about how spiritual formation is not just about one's individual relationship with God, intimacy with the Triune God. I've r There are so many good quotes in this book. He writes about "Jesus' kingdom dream." I've always been a little confused about Jesus' concept of "the Kingdom." I am still not real clear on that but it is probably some mental block on my part.The book seems to be written for millennials although, of course, very helpful for any age person. One of the first key ideas is simply about how spiritual formation is not just about one's individual relationship with God, intimacy with the Triune God. I've read many "spiritual formation" books and the focus is, well, almost mystical, ethereal....hearing God's voice, contemplation, meditation, prayer. McKnight makes the focus community and justice. He wrote a lot about caring about the poor and homeless NEXT DOOR. He mentioned how millennials are keen for experience of serving the poor in an exotic place but not caring about the poor in their community. I would like to say this is NOT just an issue with young people. For my generation (the 1980s), our focus was correct biblical truth and doctrine. I can remember people saying, "Jesus said the poor will always be with you." And then there were those who wanted to be missionaries but rarely thought of the lost next door. So this is a proverbial thing. He has an excellent chapter on love and sex. The pattern in the chapters are One Life, Kingdom Life, Justice Life, Peace Life, Church Life etc. This book could be read with a group and read a few times. In the chapter on Vocation: Some people have such a strong sense that they MUST DO SOMETHING that really matters. He wrote about his grandparents. They were poor but raised children very well and didn't that matter?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brett Shilton

    I really enjoyed this. McKnight presents a well-thought out & clear introduction to what it means to follow Jesus in this life. He touches on a great number of themes & yet doesn't lose clarity & cohesiveness throughout the book. I really enjoyed this. McKnight presents a well-thought out & clear introduction to what it means to follow Jesus in this life. He touches on a great number of themes & yet doesn't lose clarity & cohesiveness throughout the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James

    I liked it. Reminded me of Crazy Love. His style is very much like "so if this stuff Jesus said is true, what are you going to do about it?" The one very small part of the book I had trouble with was a brief discussion on hell. McKnight has a unique, contrived, and unbiblical view of hell. I liked it. Reminded me of Crazy Love. His style is very much like "so if this stuff Jesus said is true, what are you going to do about it?" The one very small part of the book I had trouble with was a brief discussion on hell. McKnight has a unique, contrived, and unbiblical view of hell.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Reid Mccormick

    “How can I discern the Lord’s will for my life?” This is a question we all have; especially young men and women finishing high school or college. Our theology constantly reiterates that God is in control and that He has a master plan for this world and He has a special plan for you. You would think that such control would impart assurance, instead we wallow in uncertainty. What if I get it wrong? I get a maximum of 100 years on this earth, what happens if I choose the wrong vocation, the wrong spo “How can I discern the Lord’s will for my life?” This is a question we all have; especially young men and women finishing high school or college. Our theology constantly reiterates that God is in control and that He has a master plan for this world and He has a special plan for you. You would think that such control would impart assurance, instead we wallow in uncertainty. What if I get it wrong? I get a maximum of 100 years on this earth, what happens if I choose the wrong vocation, the wrong spouse, the wrong church? We want to be fully immersed into God’s plan, but what is God’s plan? I picked up this book from a friend’s shelf. It looked like an interesting book, another volume in the “God’s Plan” genre. Professor Scot McKnight guides us through our life and its various aspects: love, justice, peace, sex, vocation, etc. But most importantly, he helps us define how following Jesus should impact our life. I was really impressed how McKnight walked me through the Christian faith in an innovative way. It was almost like I was listening to the good news for the first time. Follow Jesus is not about following rules but embracing a life of love. This is a great book for a college student looking to find his or her own faith.

  7. 5 out of 5

    James

    I love Scot McKnight’s posture and viewpoint in his writings. And it’s why I decided to read this book, even though is came out in 2010. As a university pastor was looking to see if this would be a good book to give to a new Christian or a young disciple. The first 50 pages of this book had me reimagining the essences of Jesus’s call to live into this kingdom life after him. For that I’m grateful. Admitted I felt this book ran out of steam half way and I found myself skimming by the end. In the I love Scot McKnight’s posture and viewpoint in his writings. And it’s why I decided to read this book, even though is came out in 2010. As a university pastor was looking to see if this would be a good book to give to a new Christian or a young disciple. The first 50 pages of this book had me reimagining the essences of Jesus’s call to live into this kingdom life after him. For that I’m grateful. Admitted I felt this book ran out of steam half way and I found myself skimming by the end. In the end, it’s something I might pull from for the chapters on Kingdom and Imagine and maybe Vocation.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

    This is Scot McKnight at his best, and this is a very timely book for the church in the North America. We need to recover the vision of discipleship that McKnight sets out: giving our while life to the kingdom dream of Jesus so it becomes marked by what matters to him and what will change the world, that is, by love, justice, peace and wisdom. if you follow Jesus and want to know how to do it better, read this book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Nipper

    I was tasked with reading The King Jesus Gospel by the same author as part of my school assignment for Liberty University. The author mentioned this book as well as a few others, and I decided to listen to it. I’m not particularly pleased with the narration. (It seemed a bit dull for this exciting topic), but I loved the book. It’s a great companion book for The King Jesus Gospel and I believe it adds insight and depth to several sections as well!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Klee

    I recommend this book for anyone who could use a rekindling of hope in our One.Life. Anyone who could use inspiration and reminders of who we are whose we are. This book is very well written, flows very nicely and is just simply a book about the everlasting love of Christ and how we should love our neighbor in light of that fact. Please read it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brad Peters

    Great book about missional, "kingdom living" loving God and loving others Great book about missional, "kingdom living" loving God and loving others

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jodie

    WOW

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Woolery

    Scot has delivered a great challenge to the usual understanding of what it means to be a Christian (a follower of Christ). After challenging the usual assumptions he then does a great job of instilling in the reader what it means to be a real follower of Christ. He also helps to see how following Christ impacts, and why it impacts, every area of a followers life. This is by far one of the best books I have read in the last year.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James

    In Scot McKnight's trademark style he unfolds here what it means to follow Jesus with your life. I like what he says here, because he is holistic in his approach and not one dimensional about discipleship but covers a lot of ground (salvation,the kingdom, justice, peace, wisdom, sex, vocation, the cross and resurrection, and more). The chapters are short and pithy making this ideal for a book group. His context as a professor (and the fact that this book was birthed out of his Jesus of Nazareth In Scot McKnight's trademark style he unfolds here what it means to follow Jesus with your life. I like what he says here, because he is holistic in his approach and not one dimensional about discipleship but covers a lot of ground (salvation,the kingdom, justice, peace, wisdom, sex, vocation, the cross and resurrection, and more). The chapters are short and pithy making this ideal for a book group. His context as a professor (and the fact that this book was birthed out of his Jesus of Nazareth class) makes this an ideal book for college age followers of Christ. Having done college ministry I think this would have been a helpful resource. Not that it doesn't say anything to older folks as well, but a lot of examples are drawn from student life. This is not my favorite McKnight book, but I don't dislike it either. I think the King Jesus Gospel (which came out after this) is the better and more important book of the two. But as always McKnight is thoughtful and informed, but accessible.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    A refreshing book on discipleship. Scot McKnight writes easily, with no frills and a touch of humor. He's the kind of professor you can tell you would have loved in college: smart but accessible, challenging but kind. A few chapters are incredible-- the community chapter shines, for example-- and I really enjoyed the first half of the book and learning what it really means to orient yourself as a follower of Jesus and his kingdom vision. The second half of the book was less strong, I felt, devot A refreshing book on discipleship. Scot McKnight writes easily, with no frills and a touch of humor. He's the kind of professor you can tell you would have loved in college: smart but accessible, challenging but kind. A few chapters are incredible-- the community chapter shines, for example-- and I really enjoyed the first half of the book and learning what it really means to orient yourself as a follower of Jesus and his kingdom vision. The second half of the book was less strong, I felt, devoting whole chapters to hot button issues like sex and hell, which removed me from the universal nature of what it means to follow Christ down into hot button issues and morality. I also felt the book was written for a less mature audience, namely college students or people in their early twenties, so at times it felt too elementary or that it discussed issues that I no longer struggle with. I would recommend it though, especially for college students or people new to the Christian faith and who would like a simple primer on what it really means to follow Jesus.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Sun

    I've been using this book as a guide for the first semester of our school year in our school's student youth group. It's been a great success so far. The lessons are concise, meaningful, and presented in a logical manner so that we can all understand it quite easily. We've all felt more compelled to follow God earnestly in all the aspects of our One.Life and to pray for God's will to be done "on earth as it is in heaven". Thanks for the great material! Con: Some concepts seem a bit outlandish, su I've been using this book as a guide for the first semester of our school year in our school's student youth group. It's been a great success so far. The lessons are concise, meaningful, and presented in a logical manner so that we can all understand it quite easily. We've all felt more compelled to follow God earnestly in all the aspects of our One.Life and to pray for God's will to be done "on earth as it is in heaven". Thanks for the great material! Con: Some concepts seem a bit outlandish, such as "polychoreting" and questioning whether hell is for eternity. They are thought provoking and interesting but sometimes it didn't feel entirely relevant. If this book was to be aimed at younger students such as high schoolers, some sections such as Sex.Life and Vocation.Life could also include the perspective of what one is to do at our age. Overall, gave my semester a good structure and would recommend. God bless.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steve Johnson

    Scot McKnight does it again. While not the same at Jesus Creed, this book builds on some of the same themes and does so in a concise manner. The writing is perfect for a college student and the topic is a must for that age group. McKnight challenges all to know that if you are not a kingdom-minded, obedient follower of Christ, you are just a poser. A kingdom-minded follower's life is characterized by love, justice, peace and wisdom. A kingdom-minded follower is committed and working within the n Scot McKnight does it again. While not the same at Jesus Creed, this book builds on some of the same themes and does so in a concise manner. The writing is perfect for a college student and the topic is a must for that age group. McKnight challenges all to know that if you are not a kingdom-minded, obedient follower of Christ, you are just a poser. A kingdom-minded follower's life is characterized by love, justice, peace and wisdom. A kingdom-minded follower is committed and working within the normative context of a church. Dr. McKnight doesn't pull any punches here. He says it with the same vigor and force as the prophets, John the Baptist and, yes, Jesus Christ, himself. There's no room in the church for half hearted following of Jesus. I know I need to check myself and my motivation after reading this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I like a lot of what Scot McKnight says. He's a scholar, and he tries not to overstate his case, and he's also passionate and provocative. Like other "radical restatements of true Christianity", he characterises the current situation in such dire terms that I find it hard to relate to his critiques. I do love the church-centric perspective of this book. His "love, justice, peace, wisdom" grid for expressing the Christian life is taking me a while to figure out. The forgiveness of the cross and t I like a lot of what Scot McKnight says. He's a scholar, and he tries not to overstate his case, and he's also passionate and provocative. Like other "radical restatements of true Christianity", he characterises the current situation in such dire terms that I find it hard to relate to his critiques. I do love the church-centric perspective of this book. His "love, justice, peace, wisdom" grid for expressing the Christian life is taking me a while to figure out. The forgiveness of the cross and the new life of the resurrection are present and significant in McKnight's thinking, but (predictably) not as central as I want them to be. In avoiding the pitfall of over-emphasising Christianity as a one-time decision, has he shifted the balance too far from what Christ has done towards what his followers ought to do?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brad Kittle

    I'm not a great reviewer of books, I don't have the time or patience for it! Scott's book was very good and I would rate much of it a 4 star and I do recommend it with this caution...we can never minimize the centrality of the cross and the out working of the new birth in our lives. Salvation is wholly and entirely through the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus. We are brought into his Kingdom society by an act of God's grace and then and only then can we proceed to live the kingdom life. J I'm not a great reviewer of books, I don't have the time or patience for it! Scott's book was very good and I would rate much of it a 4 star and I do recommend it with this caution...we can never minimize the centrality of the cross and the out working of the new birth in our lives. Salvation is wholly and entirely through the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus. We are brought into his Kingdom society by an act of God's grace and then and only then can we proceed to live the kingdom life. Jesus said' "my kingdom is not of this world." And I believe he meant it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yipeng

    I'm not here to argue about tiny parts of the book and whether Dr McKnight 'got it right' or something. Those issues may or may not exist, but the book as a whole isn't necessarily about tiny details like that. If you are a Christian, a real Christian, then you should follow your Saviour. You should take it seriously. I think his main point is excellent, his writing is accessible and easy to follow, and his words make you think about your faith. I believe this is what makes this book a good one. I'm not here to argue about tiny parts of the book and whether Dr McKnight 'got it right' or something. Those issues may or may not exist, but the book as a whole isn't necessarily about tiny details like that. If you are a Christian, a real Christian, then you should follow your Saviour. You should take it seriously. I think his main point is excellent, his writing is accessible and easy to follow, and his words make you think about your faith. I believe this is what makes this book a good one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    This book is written for self-identifies Christians, of which I am not but there is a lot more for me to agree with here than disagree with from the authors take on Jesus and Jesus message on how to conduct a life, to how important it is for all of us regardless of how we define ourselves to focus on changing what we can in our own circles of influence and building bridges rather than barriers. I won't read it again, but I am glad I read it. This book is written for self-identifies Christians, of which I am not but there is a lot more for me to agree with here than disagree with from the authors take on Jesus and Jesus message on how to conduct a life, to how important it is for all of us regardless of how we define ourselves to focus on changing what we can in our own circles of influence and building bridges rather than barriers. I won't read it again, but I am glad I read it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    This book was another more accessible version of N.T. Wright's After You Believe. I like Wright's prose more, but I think that for the broader audience of the Church, especially the college context that I work with, it is an excellent read. McKnight confronts the Christ-follower with the challenge of what it really means to have a life that holistically follows Christ's establishment of His kingdom. Very thorough. This book was another more accessible version of N.T. Wright's After You Believe. I like Wright's prose more, but I think that for the broader audience of the Church, especially the college context that I work with, it is an excellent read. McKnight confronts the Christ-follower with the challenge of what it really means to have a life that holistically follows Christ's establishment of His kingdom. Very thorough.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Danny Yang

    "What is a Christian? A Christian is one who follows Jesus by devoting his or her One.Life to the kingdom of God, fired by Jesus' own imagination, to a life of loving God and loving others, and to a society shaped by justice, especially for those who have been marginalized, to peace, and to a life devoted to acquiring wisdom in the context of a local church. This life can only be discovered by being empowered by God's Spirit." "What is a Christian? A Christian is one who follows Jesus by devoting his or her One.Life to the kingdom of God, fired by Jesus' own imagination, to a life of loving God and loving others, and to a society shaped by justice, especially for those who have been marginalized, to peace, and to a life devoted to acquiring wisdom in the context of a local church. This life can only be discovered by being empowered by God's Spirit."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    This was such an easy read. McKnight put everything in terms that the layperson can understand. Anyone could read this book; even someone who has very little knowledge of the Bible would be able to understand the concepts presented in One.Life. I highly recommend reading this book, to anyone who is wishing to be challenged to further their faith, to anyone searching for faith, and to any new Christians who wish to learn more about what it really means to be a follower of Christ.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I really enjoyed this book about what it truly means to be a disciple of Jesus. Scot McKnight gives very practical advice about how to be a disciple: finding a mentor, finding your vocation, finding out what sacrifice means, etc. I think this would be a great book for anyone interested in learning how to live our One.Life to the fullest potential God has created for us.

  26. 5 out of 5

    CJ Pankey

    This is an awesome book on what it means to be a Christian, a follower of Jesus. We have to move beyond knowing (which we're OK at) and begin doing (which we're not so good at). Knowing isn't growing, doing is! This is an awesome book on what it means to be a Christian, a follower of Jesus. We have to move beyond knowing (which we're OK at) and begin doing (which we're not so good at). Knowing isn't growing, doing is!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a great book about about the TRUE gospel and it's implication in every area of your life from love to justice to sex to church and vocation. A GREAT book for someone who is new to faith and trying to understand what following Christ really means This is a great book about about the TRUE gospel and it's implication in every area of your life from love to justice to sex to church and vocation. A GREAT book for someone who is new to faith and trying to understand what following Christ really means

  28. 4 out of 5

    Randi Carroll

    I enjoyed some chapters more than others but the ones that stuck out made a huge impact on the way I understand the Kingdom of God. I would recommend it to anyone trying to understand the Kingdom more fully.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Krista Smith

    This is why McKnight is one of my favorite authors of all time. The book is laid out perfectly and, while being a challenge to the heart and mind, is a pretty easy and enjoyable read. I flew through it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pat Roseman

    This was quite a challenging book. He says some things about the Christian life that I will have to wrestle with. Gave me a lot of food for thought.

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