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J-Horror: The Definitive Guide to The Ring, The Grudge and Beyond

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Navigating the numerous versions released in the U.S. and Japan of The Ring, The Grudge, Tomie and other films and sorting out the finest output of legends like Takashi Miike is an intimidating task. J-Horror breaks down each and every franchise, from the narrative to the talent behind the screen and other trivia, for a greater understanding and appreciation of the genre. Navigating the numerous versions released in the U.S. and Japan of The Ring, The Grudge, Tomie and other films and sorting out the finest output of legends like Takashi Miike is an intimidating task. J-Horror breaks down each and every franchise, from the narrative to the talent behind the screen and other trivia, for a greater understanding and appreciation of the genre. Learn about the influence Japanese folklore and ghost stories had on J-Horror, and the influence of J-Horror on American cinema. Just don't forget your copy on the way to the video store!


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Navigating the numerous versions released in the U.S. and Japan of The Ring, The Grudge, Tomie and other films and sorting out the finest output of legends like Takashi Miike is an intimidating task. J-Horror breaks down each and every franchise, from the narrative to the talent behind the screen and other trivia, for a greater understanding and appreciation of the genre. Navigating the numerous versions released in the U.S. and Japan of The Ring, The Grudge, Tomie and other films and sorting out the finest output of legends like Takashi Miike is an intimidating task. J-Horror breaks down each and every franchise, from the narrative to the talent behind the screen and other trivia, for a greater understanding and appreciation of the genre. Learn about the influence Japanese folklore and ghost stories had on J-Horror, and the influence of J-Horror on American cinema. Just don't forget your copy on the way to the video store!

30 review for J-Horror: The Definitive Guide to The Ring, The Grudge and Beyond

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ria

    i felt like it was a bit repetitive sometimes.some chapters could have been like 2-5pages shorter.i'd have also loved if there were more pictures.overall it was enjoyable and a great guide/introduction to japanese horror.if you love horror movies and you want to learn some shit, you should get it.it's kinda long tho i felt like it was a bit repetitive sometimes.some chapters could have been like 2-5pages shorter.i'd have also loved if there were more pictures.overall it was enjoyable and a great guide/introduction to japanese horror.if you love horror movies and you want to learn some shit, you should get it.it's kinda long tho

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Driscoll

    I got a lot out of this book, which I was reading to prep for a class I am teaching. It does have its problems, such as basically no original research and quite a few spelling mistakes and the like, but Kalat is easy to read and enjoyable. Some things that stuck out to me: J-Horror (as it is described here, the kind of horror that is exemplified by The Ring and The Grudge) has an audience primarily of young women. The Ring remake was at the time the highest grossing horror remake ever. The Korean Ri I got a lot out of this book, which I was reading to prep for a class I am teaching. It does have its problems, such as basically no original research and quite a few spelling mistakes and the like, but Kalat is easy to read and enjoyable. Some things that stuck out to me: J-Horror (as it is described here, the kind of horror that is exemplified by The Ring and The Grudge) has an audience primarily of young women. The Ring remake was at the time the highest grossing horror remake ever. The Korean Ring remake is actually more faithful to the source material, and was a big movie that was instrumental in the process of opening up Korea to Japanese films (which had been banned) (Warning: gross) There was a story here that traditional Korean folklore belief was that if a woman dies a virgin, she is more likely to come back as a ghost due to the fact she never fulfilled her motherly purpose... and so sometimes virgins who had passed away would be buried at the side of the road because men sometimes take a leak there, and the sight of a men’s genitals was supposed to calm the spirit of the virgin or something... In Hollywood and Japan, the producers find a movie project generally and then shop it around to directors. In Hong Kong, the director finds the project generally and looks for funding. As mentioned previously, young women are the primary audience for some kinds of horror (though not for splatter horror), and apparently the primary attraction for them to attend is not a particular actor or director, but whether the trailer is scary. Korean horror films are often profitable, but looked down upon by critics and many movie creators... and so Korean directors will sometimes direct a horror movie early in their careers to show what they can do, and then abandon the genre. Korean horror movies apparently also tend to follow one particular pattern (something about broken families, a character who did something in the past that was horrible and then forgot about it or developed split personalities to deal with it, and looking into the past and uncovering those memories causes pain and destroys lives)... and it’s like comfort food, so to speak. Even with J-Horror, the same stories are often recycled and refined, and a small group of directors created most of the iconic films. I think it was Hong Kong films that the book said nowadays are almost always partially funded via crowdfunding! J-Horror films from Japan tend to be dream-like and illogical, and so when they are remade in the USA, they are usually created to be less illogical, more clear. Anyway, interesting book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joe Stierman

    Great analysis and reference! Finally finished it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mads Karlsen Baekkevold

    I agree with a couple of other reviewers who found it a little repetitive - it started out very promising, but quickly devolved into "here's another J-horror franchise, and here are plot descriptions of each film in chronological order". Casual as the tone is, I still would have appreciated a touch more editorialising and asides. I agree with a couple of other reviewers who found it a little repetitive - it started out very promising, but quickly devolved into "here's another J-horror franchise, and here are plot descriptions of each film in chronological order". Casual as the tone is, I still would have appreciated a touch more editorialising and asides.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Everett

    This is a great book for anyone interested in where "J-horror" got it's start and those that helped to bring it to the forefront. My only complaint is that it can get a bit repetitive but it was a relatively quick read. This is a great book for anyone interested in where "J-horror" got it's start and those that helped to bring it to the forefront. My only complaint is that it can get a bit repetitive but it was a relatively quick read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Skyler Wolf

    A bit repetitive and I wonder if Kalat inserts himself too much into his writing. Still, I came out of the book with a great foundational knowledge of J-horror narrative and visual tropes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jon Y.

    Released as "J-horror" gave way to "torture porn" and remakes of golden age American (sometimes Canadian) slasher flicks, this is a fairly well-rounded look at the "dead wet girls" phenomenon- a good primer for the casual fan looking to get into the genre, if a bit repetitive (not unlike the films themselves), especially if one already reads their share of Midnight Eye or similar resources for fans of outre Japanese cinema. Kalat has a steady, even-keel tone throughout, which helps mend the larg Released as "J-horror" gave way to "torture porn" and remakes of golden age American (sometimes Canadian) slasher flicks, this is a fairly well-rounded look at the "dead wet girls" phenomenon- a good primer for the casual fan looking to get into the genre, if a bit repetitive (not unlike the films themselves), especially if one already reads their share of Midnight Eye or similar resources for fans of outre Japanese cinema. Kalat has a steady, even-keel tone throughout, which helps mend the largely cut-and-paste nature of some of the chapters.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Excellent introduction to the history of Japanese horror films and how it started a global phenomenon. Includes a list of films to see at the end that are referenced in the book too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A good primer for beginners. The tone is a little odd, reading somewhere between academic and informal blog-post, but Kalat has a strong command of the material.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Domini Phillips-Perkins ~Bookish Friends Reviews~

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tsukiori

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ken H.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Levi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gizem Kaya

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Conlon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cody Klimmer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mj Zhou qin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Fernandes

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ad_blankestijn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steven Jones

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Chan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Madison

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